Childhood stress = adult disorders
May 04, 2004
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (United Press International via COMTEX) -- Florida researchers have found high stress in childhood and young adulthood can indicate depressive and anxiety disorders in young adulthood.

R. Jay Turner and Donald A. Lloyd of Florida State University in Tallahassee interviewed 1,803 subjects aged 18-23 from 1998-2000.

Interviewees were assessed for major depression, dysthymia (a mild, chronic form of depression), generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorder, alcohol abuse and dependence, drug abuse and dependence, posttraumatic stress disorder, and antisocial personality disorder.

Their work is summarized in the May issue of The Archives of General Psychiatry.

"As previously reported, these results indicate that exposure to major and potentially traumatic events is commonplace among young people, at least in South Florida," Turner said.

"The typical African American in the sample had experienced more than nine such events, and the remaining three groups (Cuban, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white) averaged more than six. A total of 26 of the 33 events examined were associated with significantly increased risk for a depressive or anxiety disorder."