Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    35,398
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What is Client-Centered Therapy?

    Client-Centered Therapy
    Counselling Connection
    Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

    Developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s, this approach has proven useful for effective and constructive communication. It focuses on the client?s capacity for growth and change, using unconditional acceptance as a motivator (which encourages the client to also develop unconditional positive self regard).

    ?The primary technique of client-centered counselling is to actively listen and reflect the client?s statements in a non-directive, nonjudgmental manner, thereby providing a safe environment for the client?s self-exploration. Client-centered counseling hinges on the development of a counselor-client relationship based on unconditional regard, often over multiple hour-long sessions. This relationship enables the counselor to clarify the client?s feelings without imposing external assessments or values.? (Sheon, 2004)
    One of the aspects of this kind of counselling relationship is the perspective that the client and the counsellor are partners, moving together towards a common goal. This perspective of a partnership in the therapeutic process is a popular approach in life coaching and it has direct benefits to the client?s motivation and the relationship?s rapport building.

    See also:


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: What is Client-Centered Therapy?

    As a retired practitioner with 25 years experience I utilized the client-centered approach for about a week before realizing it did not provide enough of what client's needed for most problem areas which was some kind of direction. Referring clients to good reading material, providing them with frameworks in which to understand their problem and teaching them how to acquire and develop the necessary set of tools that would empower them and give them a sense of mastery was far more beneficial.

    Try applying client-centered therapy to a grieving individual. They want answers. They want guidance. They want support. And then they want to acquire their own tools.

    Client-centered therapy is a good place for aspiring therapists to start. But if you're going to grow in your profession you will have to move on.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    4,045
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: What is Client-Centered Therapy?

    Quote Originally Posted by David Baxter View Post

    Developed by Carl Rogers in the 1940s, this approach has proven useful for effective and constructive communication. It focuses on the client?s capacity for growth and change, using unconditional acceptance as a motivator (which encourages the client to also develop unconditional positive self regard).
    This seems to be the aproach my Psychatrist is taking with my therapy now, since my relapse. It is helping me to set realistic goals for how I am now, without feeling disapointing to anyone or down on myself.

    With a "guarded" prognosis I could not currently handle hatching open heavy issues at this point.

    Once I get strenght back again, then we start working out heavier topics.

    One of the aspects of this kind of counselling relationship is the perspective that the client and the counsellor are partners, moving together towards a common goal. This perspective of a partnership in the therapeutic process is a popular approach in life coaching and it has direct benefits to the client?s motivation and the relationship?s rapport building.
    My Psychatrist tends to encompass some of these approaches to therapy with me, even before relapse. Although more involved than the approach is currently.

    In a world where I felt like no one understood me, it was extremly helpful to feel like he was working with me. I never felt like I was to blame for how things are/were.

    Maybe doctors make sure they take approaches in accordance to the patients functionality?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    35,398
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: What is Client-Centered Therapy?

    Quote Originally Posted by drmoe View Post
    As a retired practitioner with 25 years experience I utilized the client-centered approach for about a week before realizing it did not provide enough of what client's needed for most problem areas which was some kind of direction. Referring clients to good reading material, providing them with frameworks in which to understand their problem and teaching them how to acquire and develop the necessary set of tools that would empower them and give them a sense of mastery was far more beneficial.
    As a not yet retired psychologist and psychotherapist with more than 30 years experience, I would suggest that you simply didn't understand or lacked the expertise to effectively apply the concept and principles of client-centered therapy.

    Quote Originally Posted by drmoe View Post
    Try applying client-centered therapy to a grieving individual. They want answers. They want guidance. They want support. And then they want to acquire their own tools.
    I have. And my clients get answers, guidance, support, and their own tools. That is precisely what client-centered therapy is all about. You have totally missed the point.

    Quote Originally Posted by drmoe View Post
    Client-centered therapy is a good place for aspiring therapists to start. But if you're going to grow in your profession you will have to move on.
    Absolute garbage. Total rubbish. There is no longer any doubt whatsover in my mind that you fail to understand even the first and most fundamental principles of client-centered therapy.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Disclaimer: PsychLinks is not responsible for the content of posts or comments by forum members.

Additional Forum Web Design by PsychLinks
© All rights reserved.