Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  2
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    15,344
    Mentioned
    71 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders
    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
    nih.gov

    What is TMJ?

    Temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders, commonly called "TMJ," are a group of painful conditions that affect the jaw joint and the muscles that control jaw movements. Injury plays a role in some TMJ problems, but for many people, symptoms seem to start without obvious reason. The good news is that for most people, pain in this area is not a signal of a serious problem. Generally, discomfort is occasional and temporary and will go away with little or no treatment. Even if symptoms persist, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

    Scientists sponsored by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) are looking for answers to what causes these disorders and how best to treat them. Currently, there is little scientific evidence to show which treatments work and which don't.

    What Can I Do?

    Until there is science based evidence to help health care providers make sound treatment decisions, NIDCR suggests the following:

    • Try simple self-care practices such as eating soft foods, using ice packs and avoiding extreme jaw movements, like wide yawning and gum chewing. Short-term use of over-the-counter or prescription pain medicines may also provide relief.
    • Avoid treatments that cause permanent changes in the bite or jaw. Such treatments include crown and bridge work to balance the bite, orthodontics to change the bite, grinding down teeth to bring the bite into balance (occlusal adjustment), and repositioning splints, which permanently change the bite.
    • Avoid, where possible, surgical treatment for TMJ. There have been no long-term studies to test the safety and effectiveness of these procedures. Before considering any surgery on the jaw joint, it's important to get opinions from other doctors and to fully understand the risks.

    Finding the Right Care

    Because there is no certified specialty for TMJ disorders in either dentistry or medicine, finding the right care can be difficult. Look for a health care provider who understands musculoskeletal disorders (affecting muscle, bone and joints) and who is trained in treating pain conditions. Pain clinics in hospitals and universities are often a good source of advice.

    To learn more about temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders, please see TMJ Disorders.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    I wasn't aware that TMJ did not have any proven treatments! I had seen a Dr. at a pain management place and he had me doing physiotherapy and I also was given a splint. I had a less expensive splint before and after wearing it awhile it did change my bite but my bite slowly went back to it's natural position over time.
    I wonder why they would reccommend to avoid these things, but yet some specialists actually use them.
    Really makes me want to be more educated about things prior to doing them!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    15,344
    Mentioned
    71 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    I don't know, but I did find this:

    There is not enough evidence in the literature to show that occlusal splints can reduce sleep bruxism.

    http://www.tmj.org/latebreaking.asp?id=250&
    It seems to me there are many medical professionals who do not read the latest journal articles even in their own specialty, and there may often be a financial incentive to do more, not less. Just to pick on dentists:

    The dental profession’s critics — who include public health experts, some physicians and even some dental school professors — say that too many dentists are focused more on money than medicine.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/11/bu...se&oref=slogin
    Last edited by Daniel; June 30th, 2009 at 11:19 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    That doesn't really surprise me I guess. The cost of my splint I have now (though I did not have to pay for it) was almost $1200. I saw different Dr.s and they both specialized in TMD, but the last one I saw was over 2 years ago so maybe different research has come out. I still agree that certain things are way over priced.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    15,344
    Mentioned
    71 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    Stubborn TMJ Pain? Try Trigger Point Massage and Jaw Exercises Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic

    It’s been a jaw-clenching, teeth-grinding kind of week. (When isn’t it that kind of week?) And now, you have excruciating jaw pain. Ibuprofen? Might as well put a bandage on your jaw for all the help it’s doing.

    So how do you spell jaw pain relief? M-A-S-S-A-G-E.

    Many factors contribute to what was once called “lockjaw,” a disorder of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that causes:

    • Jaw pain or tenderness, often while chewing.
    • Headache or facial pain.
    • Earache or ringing in the ears.
    • Difficulty opening or closing the mouth (hence the term, “lockjaw”).

    There are different causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), including arthritis or a jaw injury. But if TMD is related to tightness and imbalance in the TMJ muscles because of clenching, a professional jaw massage might be what the doctor ordered.

    “I’ve found manipulation by a professional, plus jaw exercises, to be highly effective,” says chiropractor Andrew Bang, DC. “When painkillers and bite guards don’t cut it, these types of manual therapy are a good next step.”

    Full article including videos

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    36,305
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders

    Back in the 80s, TMD was the latest big money maker for dentists: hand over all your money - we can cure that.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Disclaimer: PsychLinks is not responsible for the content of posts or comments by forum members.

Additional Forum Web Design by PsychLinks
© All rights reserved.