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  1. #11
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    Re: Options On The Flex-Work Menu

    On the positive side regarding the gig economy, the author of Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America mentions that an emerging alternative to companies like Uber and Instacart are platform co-ops (which are still relatively small):

    Platform cooperative - Wikipedia

    A platform cooperative, or platform co-op, is a cooperatively owned, democratically governed business that establishes a computing platform, and uses a website, mobile app or a protocol to facilitate the sale of goods and services. Platform cooperatives are an alternative to venture capital-funded platforms insofar as they are owned and governed by those who depend on them most—workers, users, and other relevant stakeholders.

  2. #12
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  3. #13
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    Re: Options On The Flex-Work Menu

    Part-Time Entrepreneur? Why It's the Way to Go

    A study by [the] University of Wisconsin-Madison showed that people who engage in a venture on a part-time basis are 33 percent less likely to fail than people who just quit their jobs and do a startup full time.

  4. #14
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    Re: Options On The Flex-Work Menu

    How coronavirus could change your office space and remote work from home - Vox

    According to a new MIT report, 34 percent of Americans who previously commuted to work report that they were working from home by the first week of April due to the coronavirus. That’s the same percentage of people who can work from home, according to a recent University of Chicago publication.

    These new numbers represent a seismic shift in work culture. Prior to the pandemic, the number of people regularly working from home remained in the single digits, with only about 4 percent of the US workforce working from home at least half the time. However, the trend of working from home had been gaining momentum incrementally for years, as technology and company cultures increasingly accommodated it. So it’s also likely that many Americans who are now working from home for the first time will continue to do so after the pandemic.

    “Once they’ve done it, they’re going to want to continue,” said Kate Lister, president of consulting firm Global Workplace Analytics, which is currently running a survey about work-from-home participation. She predicts that 30 percent of people will work from home multiple days per week within a couple of years. Lister added that there has been pent-up demand by employees for greater work-life flexibility, and that the coronavirus has made their employers see the light, especially as they themselves have had to work from home.

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