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  1. #11
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    Mar 2004
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    Re: How Much Would You Spend on a Sick Pet?

    Up here, they do have low cost neuter clinics a couple of times per year.

  2. #12
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    Aug 2004
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    Arizona
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    Re: How Much Would You Spend on a Sick Pet?

    We called our regular vet/hospital and they wanted well over $300 US to neuter our one-year-old chihuahua. And in the past, they have quoted well over $600 for a dental cleaning. I understand they have more equipment for anesthesia emergencies, etc., but the pricing is way more than we were used to in Florida.

    So off to the low-cost clinic he went We also had them do a dental cleaning (since that is their main business), and they include digital x-rays for no extra cost. The low-cost dental clinic doesn't have a single negative review as far as animal care, so they seem to always do a great job.
    “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I'll meet you there.” ~ Rumi

  3. #13
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    Re: How Much Would You Spend on a Sick Pet?

    There's a place like that in Ottawa. They have all the latest veterinary equipment - MRA, ultrasound, whatever - so of course they like to use it, and even if they don't they have to pay for it. They are by far the most expensive vets in the area.

    When my son's dog was ill, they used everything they had to try and identify the cause and to try to avoid exploratory surgery. In the end, after all the tests they still didn't know so they did exploratory surgery to find and remove half a frisbie he'd eaten.

    They charged him $5000 for that when they could have started with the surgery at a fraction of the cost.

    I was appalled.

  4. #14
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    Re: How Much Would You Spend on a Sick Pet?

    FYI: in Ontario, Canada:

    The Farley Foundation assists those who are struggling financially to pay for veterinary care for their pets. Pet owners who cannot afford medical care for their sick or injured pet, and who fall into one of the categories below, are encouraged to talk to their veterinarian about the availability of Farley Foundation funding:

    • Seniors receiving the Federal Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS).
    • Disabled individuals receiving the Ontario Disability Support Payment (ODSP) or the Canada Pension Plan Disability Payment (CPP Disability).
    • Women at risk of abuse who are entering a registered Ontario women’s shelter and who are participating in OVMA’s SafePet Program.
    • Individuals receiving assistance through the Ontario Works Program.
    • Supportive housing for seniors, retirement homes or long-term care facilities with live-in pets.


    Who We Help - The Farley Foundation
    More resources, including pet food banks: https://torontohumanesociety.com/pdf...fford_Care.pdf


    In the US:

    Having trouble affording veterinary care? | The Humane Society of the United States
    “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I'll meet you there.” ~ Rumi

  5. #15
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    Re: How Much Would You Spend on a Sick Pet?

    Pet Health Care: Why I Didnt Pay for a $6,000 Surgery | Money
    November 21, 2016
    By Taylor Tepper

    At 2 a.m. Wednesday morning my wife drove our nearly 14 year-old miniature dachshund to a 24-hour vet 30-minutes from our house. Thirteen hours later we sat in the veterinarian’s exam room and told her we weren’t going to pay $6,000 for an emergency gall-bladder surgery for our dog. Twenty-minutes later Chloe was gone...

    In Chloe’s half-a-day stay at the vet, she already needed $2,500 in care (which my mother-in-law graciously offered to cover.) Her doctors ran blood tests, sonograms and an echocardiogram. They gave her fluids and pain medication to ease the agony. Her liver and other organs were inflamed, and her gall bladder needed to be removed.

    “She’s a sick dog,” her doctor told us, which reduced Chloe’s chances of recovery. And that’s if she survived going under the knife...

    We were numb on the drive home. We had used up most of our tears, and the weight of deciding to end her life was suffocating. We were sleep deprived, starving and in shock. We told Chloe stories in between sitting in silence. We told ourselves it was her time, even though we knew it might not have been.

    In a few years, we’ll have another dog and another child. I think that makes us masochists, at least when it comes to pets. We’ll love our new dog, and so will our kid and future kids, but on one random Tuesday 10 to 15 years later that dog will get sick and need some operation of limited utility that we won’t be able to afford. And we’ll go through this all over again.

    There is only one rationale that makes sense to me: the love you experience, for a pet or a person, transcends the pain and daily grind and connects you to something bigger. At least that’s what I tell myself.
    “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I'll meet you there.” ~ Rumi

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