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  1. #1
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    Typical Themes Associated with Chronic Unemployment

    Typical Themes Associated with Chronic Unemployment

    Depression themes: (hopeless occupational situation): It's too late for me to start a career; it's impossible to get a job

    Defective themes: My c.v. has gaps in it; I have never been disciplined enough to succeed at a job; I'm too embarrassed about being unemployed so long; I'm not qualified enough to apply for this job; I've always been destined to fail

    Entitlement themes: These jobs are below me, too menial, boring; I'm not a nine-to-five person; I can't stand working with idiots

    Rigid job criteria: It's against my principles to take a low-paying job when I should make double the salary; no other occupation is acceptable

    Unrealistic occupational goals: What I really want is to be a rock singer; I've always wanted to be a doctor; I could start my own business and make a lot of money

    Magical thinking: I'll buy a business after I win the lottery; I can do a deal and make a million

    Abdication of responsibility: I can't do anything about it, the system has to change; I leave it to fate

    Avoidance themes: I must be cured of my anxiety first before I can begin to think of looking for a job; mother needs me at home; I need to fix my computer first

    Vulnerability themes: I'd go crazy cooped up at an office all day

    External blame themes: New immigrants are taking all the jobs from us; employees are corrupt; employers don't listen to me during interviews; female bosses have it in for me; every time I made a career plan, someone shoots it down

    Source: Developmental Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Adults

  2. #2
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    Re: Typical Themes Associated with Chronic Unemployment

    Intriguing. Certain ideas occur to me.

    1) Many of the above themes could apply to "chronically employed" persons, though of course employed persons are at least doing something to stay self-sufficient economically.

    2) I believe unemployment numbers will continue to be high for some years to come, and for some of those years get much higher--in other words I think this is a timely post in a longer term trend.

    I don't pretend to grasp the fractal or Fibonacci patterns or technical market jargon, but the mass psychology part of Elliott Wave theory seems to make intuitive sense: mass mood drives market. In other words, the herd of humanity doesn't feel depressed and afraid because of a bear market, but rather (or primarily), our collective "afraid and depressed" (or otherwise negative) mood drives us en masse to act in ways that cause a bear market. The herd stampedes because of fear or other negative moods.

    Unemployment rates are one of many economic parameters to measure mass mood. I don't want to hire because tomorrow's sales will be worse than today's. I can't get a job because I can't get a job. Or whatever and so on--the above post bullet points may each apply.

    Of course conversely, when we are feeling hopeful or greedy, optimistic, trusting, and are otherwise "positive" in mass mood, we cause a bull market. There is more to it and caveats to be made (not just individual and sub-group variation), and the theory is not necessarily incompatible with other things like demographic shifts, but the theory seems worthy of consideration in the broad sweep of things such as cannot wholly be avoided when considering themes associated with the psychology of chronic unemployment or current market uncertainties.

  3. #3
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    Re: Typical Themes Associated with Chronic Unemployment

    Yep, I fit the defective themes a little bit on the external side too.

    I'm Mr. "I'm too under-qualified for this position" and a bit of "It's the epidemic of society, there's just no new ideas, and I have no idea either." So what do I do?

    I know if apply to something above me it's waste of time, also it's a waste to try to comb at myself to see exactly where I fit with my so-called skills, so-called experience, and education, I'm just not that specialized enough. Where I am, I need real world experience, and I can't get it, or it's just not good enough.

    On another note, the wave theory sounds interesting, I remember something similar to it in my macroeconomics II class, I forget who it was, but it was a theory of inflation--the logic was "if consumers and firms behave like there will be inflation, there will be inflation".

  4. #4
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    Re: Typical Themes Associated with Chronic Unemployment

    Stability Can Be the Toughest Job in the World--We Deserve Some Credit! | bpHope.com

    In many ways, recovery is its own profession, and it requires just as much diligence, resilience, and teamwork as any worthwhile career path. At certain times in my life, recovery has had to become my full-time job. Some people label such stints with terms like "unemployment" and "disability," but for those of us living with serious psychiatric conditions like bipolar disorder, we know that recovery can be the toughest job in the world. And despite the fact that no one is handing us degrees or stacks of cash, we deserve some credit for it.

    I have worked harder at my recovery than I ever did in law school and graduate school combined. Over the years, I’ve worked as a restaurant server, jewelry store clerk, barista, fudge confectioner, gift shop attendant, estate lawyer, and now, writer. While each of these positions has presented its own unique challenges, not one of them has been half as challenging as my recovery.

    And the single factor most responsible for helping me evolve from full-time recovery to full-time writing to full-time living again hasn’t been my personal perseverance or my personal anything—it has been my team...

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