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  1. #1

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    I am curious to know: Are there a lot of OCD people who are now receiving disability payments?

  2. #2

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    I am curious to know: Are there a lot of OCD people who are now receiving disability payments?

  3. #3

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    I don't know the answer to that but there are wide variations in the severity of OCD symptoms and I think that today, with the much broader range of treatments available, most people are able to manage their symptoms with a combination of medication and psychotherapy and to live fairly productive lives, so they don't require disability or at least not for an extended period of time.

  4. #4

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    I don't know the answer to that but there are wide variations in the severity of OCD symptoms and I think that today, with the much broader range of treatments available, most people are able to manage their symptoms with a combination of medication and psychotherapy and to live fairly productive lives, so they don't require disability or at least not for an extended period of time.

  5. #5

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    Many people, with or without mental problems, aren't ideally suited for a 9-to-5 job, anyway. I'm thinking of people who work more productively as freelancers, temps, independent contractors, and as small business owners.

    For example, the lead character in the TV show "Monk" had to quit his full-time job as a police detective because of his OCD, but he is able to do consulting work part-time even though his primary focus is on germs, etc. Of course, if most people with mental problems could afford a personal assistant like he can, they would be more productive, too.

    Also, according to Social Security's definition of "disability," a person with a disability may be able to work 10 or so hours a week since that is usually not considered "substantial gainful activity."
    "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #6

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    Many people, with or without mental problems, aren't ideally suited for a 9-to-5 job, anyway. I'm thinking of people who work more productively as freelancers, temps, independent contractors, and as small business owners.

    For example, the lead character in the TV show "Monk" had to quit his full-time job as a police detective because of his OCD, but he is able to do consulting work part-time even though his primary focus is on germs, etc. Of course, if most people with mental problems could afford a personal assistant like he can, they would be more productive, too.

    Also, according to Social Security's definition of "disability," a person with a disability may be able to work 10 or so hours a week since that is usually not considered "substantial gainful activity."
    "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

  7. #7

    What about....

    Are you saying that most disabled people can work 10 or more hours a week?

    I do agree that I see what youre saying, but does that mean that because they CAN work 10 or more hours a week, that the government wont give them Social Security payments if they applied for it?

    Cuz no one can live on 10 hours a week. I live with my mom but shes 68 and I would like to see her retire soon!

    I feel bad because shes working and I am filing for disability, and I would most definitely like to be able to get those disability payments! (So she can retire!)

    Also, do you mean that I can get disability and still work 10 or more hours a week?

  8. #8

    What about....

    Are you saying that most disabled people can work 10 or more hours a week?

    I do agree that I see what youre saying, but does that mean that because they CAN work 10 or more hours a week, that the government wont give them Social Security payments if they applied for it?

    Cuz no one can live on 10 hours a week. I live with my mom but shes 68 and I would like to see her retire soon!

    I feel bad because shes working and I am filing for disability, and I would most definitely like to be able to get those disability payments! (So she can retire!)

    Also, do you mean that I can get disability and still work 10 or more hours a week?

  9. #9

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    The 10 hours figure I gave was just an example. "Substantial gainful activity" is based on earnings:

    To be eligible for disability benefits, a person must be unable to engage in substantial gainful activity (SGA). A person who is earning more than a certain monthly amount (net of impairment-related work expenses) is ordinarily considered to be engaging in SGA.

    http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/SGA.html
    For 2005, if a (non-blind) disabled person earns less than $830 a month, they can still continue to receive Social Security disability. However, the Social Security payments are reduced accordingly.

    As far as applying for the disability payments, I don't know if working less than part-time is a help or hindrance in getting approved. There are so many factors that it probably depends on the individual case. For some claims, it may be more believable if a person is working a few hours a week and says "I can barely do this" than if they didn't work at all. In other cases, working at all may be a sign that the person will be able to work substantially within 1 year. A Social Security disability attorney should know, of course. (According the Social Security rules, Social Security disability attorneys can only charge up to 25% of backpay if they win the claim.)
    "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

  10. #10

    Are there a lot of people with OCD that now get disability?

    The 10 hours figure I gave was just an example. "Substantial gainful activity" is based on earnings:

    To be eligible for disability benefits, a person must be unable to engage in substantial gainful activity (SGA). A person who is earning more than a certain monthly amount (net of impairment-related work expenses) is ordinarily considered to be engaging in SGA.

    http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/COLA/SGA.html
    For 2005, if a (non-blind) disabled person earns less than $830 a month, they can still continue to receive Social Security disability. However, the Social Security payments are reduced accordingly.

    As far as applying for the disability payments, I don't know if working less than part-time is a help or hindrance in getting approved. There are so many factors that it probably depends on the individual case. For some claims, it may be more believable if a person is working a few hours a week and says "I can barely do this" than if they didn't work at all. In other cases, working at all may be a sign that the person will be able to work substantially within 1 year. A Social Security disability attorney should know, of course. (According the Social Security rules, Social Security disability attorneys can only charge up to 25% of backpay if they win the claim.)
    "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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