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Thread: Effexor

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    Effexor

    Hello.
    I was wondering if anybody was taking or had any information on this drug.I heard it does wonders and is new to the market.
    Thank You,
    Michael.

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    Effexor

    Hello.
    I was wondering if anybody was taking or had any information on this drug.I heard it does wonders and is new to the market.
    Thank You,
    Michael.

  3. #3
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    Effexor

    Treatment for mood disorders varies from one person to another, the choice of which is determined in consultation and discussion with one's physician. Although one person may find one particular medication or mode of therapy effective for them, because everyone's brain and body chemistry is different, it may not have the same effectiveness in another person.

    That being said, Effexor (venlafaxine is the generic name) is manufactured by Wyeth Ltd and has been marketed since 1995 approx.

    Effexor (Efx) is similar to yet a bit different from the class of medications known as SSRI's (selective seretonin reuptake inhibitors) like Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil.

    Efx is a seretonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), meaning its mode of action is directed to the two neurotransmitters, seretonin and norepinepherine...though to be associated with depression.

    There are other reasons why a physician might consider EFX as it has less potential for certain types of drug interactions than occur with SSRI's.

    Every medication can produce unwanted adverse reactions (side effects) which is why it's important to establish a plan to maintain communication with your physician to advise him/her of how the medication makes you feel, and if you experience unwanted side effects.

    This class of medication takes a few weeks to demonstrate effectiveness in relieving symptoms, while your physician may tell you some side effects will go away with time as your body acclimates to the new brain chemistry.

    I would propose you not go to your doctor with the expectation you will get a prescription for a specific medication, instead you may find your doctor follows a protocol with which he/she has experience in using.

    The goal is to get relief from depression, and to experience more good days than bad days. Discussion with your physician along with his/her team of therapists can help you accomplish that goal.

  4. #4
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    Effexor

    Treatment for mood disorders varies from one person to another, the choice of which is determined in consultation and discussion with one's physician. Although one person may find one particular medication or mode of therapy effective for them, because everyone's brain and body chemistry is different, it may not have the same effectiveness in another person.

    That being said, Effexor (venlafaxine is the generic name) is manufactured by Wyeth Ltd and has been marketed since 1995 approx.

    Effexor (Efx) is similar to yet a bit different from the class of medications known as SSRI's (selective seretonin reuptake inhibitors) like Prozac, Zoloft and Paxil.

    Efx is a seretonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), meaning its mode of action is directed to the two neurotransmitters, seretonin and norepinepherine...though to be associated with depression.

    There are other reasons why a physician might consider EFX as it has less potential for certain types of drug interactions than occur with SSRI's.

    Every medication can produce unwanted adverse reactions (side effects) which is why it's important to establish a plan to maintain communication with your physician to advise him/her of how the medication makes you feel, and if you experience unwanted side effects.

    This class of medication takes a few weeks to demonstrate effectiveness in relieving symptoms, while your physician may tell you some side effects will go away with time as your body acclimates to the new brain chemistry.

    I would propose you not go to your doctor with the expectation you will get a prescription for a specific medication, instead you may find your doctor follows a protocol with which he/she has experience in using.

    The goal is to get relief from depression, and to experience more good days than bad days. Discussion with your physician along with his/her team of therapists can help you accomplish that goal.

  5. #5
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    Effexor

    How an individual will react to the family of medications known as SSRIs and SNRIs is very difficult to predict. Effexor is indeed a very effective medication for many people suffering from depression or anxiety disorders.

    On the other hand, for some people there are side effects which are more commonly experienced with Effexor than other drugs in this family, notably excessive sleepiness or insomnia and sometimes sexual dysfunction. Some people also experience withdrawal effects and these are most commonly seen with Paxil and Effexor. That said, some people do not experience ANY of these potential adverse effects with Effexor.

    The best advice is to talk to your doctor about your specific symptoms, and trust him/her to prescribe appropriately based on his/her knowledge of you and your medical history. And then make sure the doctor gets your feedback. With any of these medications, if you do experience side effects that last more than a few days, or do not show clear signs of decreasing by about day 5, get back to the doctor and ask to change to one of the other drugs in the same family. That will usually resolve the problem.

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    Effexor

    How an individual will react to the family of medications known as SSRIs and SNRIs is very difficult to predict. Effexor is indeed a very effective medication for many people suffering from depression or anxiety disorders.

    On the other hand, for some people there are side effects which are more commonly experienced with Effexor than other drugs in this family, notably excessive sleepiness or insomnia and sometimes sexual dysfunction. Some people also experience withdrawal effects and these are most commonly seen with Paxil and Effexor. That said, some people do not experience ANY of these potential adverse effects with Effexor.

    The best advice is to talk to your doctor about your specific symptoms, and trust him/her to prescribe appropriately based on his/her knowledge of you and your medical history. And then make sure the doctor gets your feedback. With any of these medications, if you do experience side effects that last more than a few days, or do not show clear signs of decreasing by about day 5, get back to the doctor and ask to change to one of the other drugs in the same family. That will usually resolve the problem.

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    Effexor

    Some people also experience withdrawal effects and these are most commonly seen with Paxil and Effexor
    Both these meds have very short metabolic half lives. The original Effexor required twice a day dosing schedule, which I believe has changed with the Extended Release version.

    The positive side of short half life drugs is the rapid therapeutic steady state, when the amount taken equals the amount excreted...but the down side is when the medication is withdrawn.

    Physicians overcome withdrawl effects by tapering the dose over a period of time rather than stopping the drug abruptly.

    However, withdrawl when switching from one SSRI/SNRI med to another does not appear to be an issue.

  8. #8
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    Effexor

    Some people also experience withdrawal effects and these are most commonly seen with Paxil and Effexor
    Both these meds have very short metabolic half lives. The original Effexor required twice a day dosing schedule, which I believe has changed with the Extended Release version.

    The positive side of short half life drugs is the rapid therapeutic steady state, when the amount taken equals the amount excreted...but the down side is when the medication is withdrawn.

    Physicians overcome withdrawl effects by tapering the dose over a period of time rather than stopping the drug abruptly.

    However, withdrawl when switching from one SSRI/SNRI med to another does not appear to be an issue.

  9. #9
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    Effexor

    However, withdrawl when switching from one SSRI/SNRI med to another does not appear to be an issue.
    Actually, it can be. Some people definitely experiencve a problem switching from Paxil to anything else and need to first taper down the Paxil gradually.

  10. #10
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    Effexor

    However, withdrawl when switching from one SSRI/SNRI med to another does not appear to be an issue.
    Actually, it can be. Some people definitely experiencve a problem switching from Paxil to anything else and need to first taper down the Paxil gradually.

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