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  1. #61
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel View Post
    Does your therapist answer phone calls faster than e-mail
    No idea, I've never called him. He did a same-day reply the one time on sms but it could have been a coincidence. He replied to one email quickly too (ie. the next Tues/Thurs afternoon, for my last session booking).

  2. #62
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    Pre-Internet boom, when therapy was more easily covered by insurance, many therapists/psychologists had receptionists during the day and had an answering service off hours, such as for emergencies, and would get back to you as needed.

    one perspective:

    The Pros and Cons of Emails Between Doctor and Patients

    Do not use email for urgent communications. Use the telephone. You usually have no idea how quickly your email will be read.

  3. #63
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    Yeah he does have a receptionist but because I'm seeing him at a time of day when it's an "if he's available at that time" thing, the receptionist used to have to ask him and get back to me afterwards cause she didn't know that part of his calendar. So I guess he just decided it was easier to manage without a middleman when he suggested the email thing.

    I also don't think anyone would see it as urgent. Plus talking to him probably won't even help.

  4. #64
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    With online therapy, you can see any therapist in the world, relatively speaking. So to me, he is not acting very competitive. For e-mails concerning scheduling, my local therapists have usually replied within 24 hours (often within several hours), though not always.

    And these days, some therapists let you book online instantly with an online calendar.

  5. #65
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    Honestly, given the ongoing nature of these e-mail issues, I do wonder if you would be better off with a therapist who didn't seem to frustrate you as much (at least logistically), inadvertently or not.

    Or perhaps simply calling his office will trigger him to remember to respond to his email.

  6. #66
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    That's why my first plan is to ask that we schedule things in a different way and stop using email. We can figure out a way to notify of cancellations (perhaps via reception for those) but otherwise there should be no need for emails whatsoever.

    Calling the office likely won't result in a faster response. It also seems like a dumb thing for me to stress out over. But it just isn't a helpful thing to have to deal with and there's a pretty easy solution to remove the problem for next time.

    I'm up to my 5th "angry response award" at work since the 30th (although I awarded myself two counts for something rather than just the one).

  7. #67
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    I'm also the type to respond a lot faster to a text than an email.

    but hey I hope the drumstick was good.

    Sorry to hear your ******* sad. Maybe try another ice cream or 2 or 3
    ​"A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out." ~ Walter Winchell

  8. #68
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    I think best for gooblaroo to stick with this guy. Just find a way to eliminate the bull regarding scheduling.

    She knows him, he knows her and I’m assuming he understands Aussie which eliminates someone else constantly responding with “I don’t have a ****** clue what you just said.
    ​"A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out." ~ Walter Winchell

  9. #69
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    Scheduling is so basic though, which is why I would call his office. Imagine having to e-mail your dentist to make an appointment and then waiting for a reply about when you can be seen for a toothache.

  10. #70
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    Re: My ongoing therapy dilemma

    And (more so in theory than practice) a good therapist proactively and regularly solicits feedback from clients about the therapeutic process/relationship, especially anything that is not favorable. It's important to speak up in any case to get the most out of therapy.

    Why Do People Leave Therapy Prematurely?

    Healing in therapy is not just about getting results and meeting goals; it is also about the process of the therapeutic relationship. It is about how things unfold as you are exploring issues with your therapist. Therefore, sometimes constructive feedback is needed from people in therapy to minimize impasses and misunderstandings. This proactive approach can itself be a reflection of significant growth. For example, let’s say this person has relational difficulties, such as discussing vulnerable feelings. This is a wonderful opportunity to practice giving constructive feedback, which the person can then apply to other relationships. A competent therapist will often be very receptive to constructive feedback at any time during the sessions.

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