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  1. #21

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    Miss ex-clean is being treated for OCD, bipolar II, and PTSD, and I am wondering with bipolar II, I am taking klonopin which makes me feel quite calm! How many people acutally get addicted to klonopin(I am taking the smalles dose to 1 gram a day)

    Also, how do you know if with bipolar II you are in a very good mood or it is just hypomanic?
    What is the most amount of medicine you have ever given anyone?

    Is it accurate to say that with an OCD/bipolar II individual that the ups are considered manic and when I am down, I am very OCD?
    Last edited by prayerbear; October 29th, 2007 at 08:10 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  2. #22

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    I am taking klonopin which makes me feel quite calm! How many people actually get addicted to klonopin (I am taking the smalles dose to 1 gram a day)
    Klonipin (clonazepam) is a mild tranquilizer (benzopdiazepine). It is intended to make you feel less anxious, more calm. All benzodiazepines have some potential for addiction but at the low doses (you mean up to 1 mg, not 1 gram, by the way) you are taking, there is little danger as long as you stay within your doctor's orders as to dose.

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    Also, how do you know if with bipolar II you are in a very good mood or it is just hypomanic?
    Hypomania is a little more than just a good mood. One of the ways to check is to solicit feedback from others who know you well.

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    What is the most amount of medicine you have ever given anyone?
    In Canada, psychologists can not prescribe medications.

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    Is it accurate to say that with an OCD/bipolar II individual that the ups are considered manic and when I am down, I am very OCD?
    No, it's not that simple, Your OCD symptoms are likely to become more intense or severe under stress or elevated anxiety. With bipolar, the other end of the manic/hypomanic dimension is depression rather than anxiety.

  3. #23

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    Miss ex-clean is being treated for OCD, bipolar II, and PTSD, and I am wondering with bipolar II, I am taking klonopin which makes me feel quite calm! How many people acutally get addicted to klonopin(I am taking the smalles dose to 1 gram a day)
    I'd like to address this from personal (not professional) experience, and maybe someone can fill in the gaps. My guess is that everyone's physiology is different as to the addictive potential of benzodiazepines. In my case, I was given klonopin in 1992, at first at a low dosage, yet prescribed to be taken regularly (the same dosage each day). I think the dosage was 1.5mg a day. (I was told this was a low dose.)

    It wasn't very long before the same psychiatrist had me at 6mg a day, which I was told was the highest permissible dosage in the United States. (Later someone told me that higher dosages were all right for certain conditions). I asked the psychiatrist if I were "addicted," and she said, "no, but you are dependent." I was definitely habituated. I felt that if I were not to take it, something would somehow go wrong. If there was a foul-up and I didn't get a refill on time, I started feeling hyper, and there were uncomfortable changes in my breathing.

    They later fired the psychiatrist. This is significant only because I think she mis-diagnosed a lot of people. She had me at Generalized Anxiety Disorder, then when they gave me to a new doctor, he diagnosed me bipolar, started to wean me off of the klonopin, and wanted to give me depakote. But I didn't believe him, and after I got down to 2.5mg a day of klonopin, I was so hyper I couldn't stand it anymore. I attributed all of this to klonopin addiction. So I went back up to 5mg a day, and eventually back to 6mg a day. I couldn't function without it.

    I've discussed this all in earlier posts. I know the exact date when I stopped taking klonopin: May 10, 2004. Although I stopped cold turkey, this is not to be recommended. I could have had a seizure, but I didn't. The dosage from which I stopped at that time was 4mg a day. I'd recently been in the psych ward for 9 days because I was having a manic episode, and the doctor there took the dosage from 6mg down to 4mg. I slowly lost my Kaiser insurance during the episode, and I simply took the 4mg per day until I ran out and couldn't obtain any more.

    There were other factors, but this is the gist. I basically thank God that I got off of this stuff, and it's been over three years now. I still have a prescription for valium, but I hardly ever take it, and I don't enjoy it when I do. The last time I took a valium was over 6 weeks ago. My experiences with klonopin have left me with a permanent aversion to benzodizepines.

    This is my own subjective experience, but there are probably those who share similar experiences with these drugs, so I did feel compelled to share. Good luck to you.

  4. #24

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    I wouldn't like to see anyone remaining on 6 mg of clonazepam or lorazepam for any extended period of time either, Stargazer.

    However, people can and do remain on these medications for extended periods of time without suffering adverse side-effects and they are very effective in treating certain kinds of anxiety. The key factors to monitor are (1) the development of tolerance for the drug, where the patient finds that the dose needs to be increased stepwise over time in order to be effective; and (2) the development of excessive fatigue. In my experience, for most people this will not be an issue at doses in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 mg per day.

    On the other hand, as with many other medications, abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepines is not advisable. One is likely to experience a rebound (spike) in anxiety and insomnia for a period of time until the individual withdraws from the medication. Most or all of this can be avoided by gradually tapering off the medication under the supervision of your physician.

  5. #25

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    That all makes sense with my personal subjective experience as well. I think that, had I still had medical insurance and a doctor at the time, the doctor would probably have set up a schedule for me to get off of the final 4mg/day klonopin more gradually. But because I lost my Kaiser health insurance shortly after being released from St. Joseph's, I didn't have that benefit.

    Also, because I was having a manic episode at the time, I wasn't thinking quite clearly around the subject. It's somewhat remarkable that I didn't experience noticeable withdrawal symptoms after going off of 4mg/day "cold turkey," but let's put it this way: other people noticed stuff that I didn't notice, because I wasn't very in touch with my behaviour at the time.

    Also, I hope I didn't discourage Miss Clean -- if you're fine at the lower dosage, I wouldn't worry about getting addicted. Also, I don't know a whole lot about OCD. I'm bipolar I, and that also might be a difference to be considered.

  6. #26

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    I sure won't go above the reccomended dose,and sorry Stargazer about that bad experience with that psychologist! The first time I took Klonopin, I felt REALLY GOOD!
    I know what hypomanic is, but what is it like having to be hospitialized for being manic? If you are comfortable replying, my sister was bipolar I! She would get up on the roof and smile at lots of strange men and act hypersexual-scary.
    Aren't the lows really low? Like major depressive disorder to the ninth degree? Don't all bipolar I dismiss taking meds when they are feeling really high?
    OCD is major anxiety, along with a fear of losing control.

    bye for now,
    miss ex-clean,
    (a recovering cleaning addict)

  7. #27

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    If you are comfortable replying, my sister was bipolar I! She would get up on the roof and smile at lots of strange men and act hypersexual-scary.
    I'm comfortable replying, but can't do so right now because I'm at work, and time is limited. I'll prepare something, though, and probably post it in a day or so. Hyper-sexuality was definitely involved, as well as hyper-reliogisity. It scared a lot of people, although I didn't think anything was wrong at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by miss ex-clean View Post
    OCD is major anxiety, along with a fear of losing control.
    I understand. I have a friend who is OCD and has described some of his symptoms. I just don't have personal experience in that area.

  8. #28
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    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    this link mite help


  9. #29

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    I was directed back here by an email notification, and I haven't watched the YouTube yet, but I am surprised I wrote all the things that I did earlier in this thread. I can sure be long-winded.

    I'm on new meds now, and I think I am writing fewer words and less often than usual, in general. I also find myself making fewer phone calls, and I think I am more content within myself. I don't feel as compelled to buzz people as often as I used to, or in an angry way that would sometimes come out of the blue.

    I think the meds are fine, and I'm not experiencing periods of unusual agitation, anger, or severe mood swings. I'm getting a lot of work, I like my living situation, and life is good. I make it to my appointments regularly, and go to church every Sunday, and am generally more easy-going than earlier. My family relationships are a little more positive -- brother, sister, daughter (I don't know about stepdaughter.)

    I think this mix of meds has a lot to do with it -- and yes, I am continuing to avoid benzodiazepines. Not good for me, though I'm sure they are beneficial to others, in the right dose.

  10. #30

    Re: Bipolar I Disorder versus Bipolar II Disorder

    That's excellent news, stargazer. Thank you for the update.

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