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  1. #1
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    Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    I have two questions that i'm hoping to get some feed back on.

    the 1st is:- how does one know for sure if one is coming down from a hypomanic ep.?


    and the 2nd is:-
    I'm wondering if anyone here has any ideas on med-less coping skills that might prevent me from "coming down" or going down too far. I have read a various articles on what can happen when one "comes down" but i'm hoping to hear if this coming down can be somehow prevented. maybe some members here have ideas\skills they used?

  2. #2
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    Re: how do you know and coping skills ?

    I can only speak from the perspective of a mother of a bipolar, but my daughter was never able to control the highs and lows without medication. Once she got on the right medications, and with the help of her therapist, she began to see daylight. Up until then, she was at the mercy of her condition. Some of the lows were pretty tough.

  3. #3
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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    Fog, the cold truth is that an individual with bipolar disorder is not going to be able to manage the mood cycles without medication.

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    Why is it that some people seem to stay "up" almost all the time & never come down? I worked with someone like that, and she was almost unbearable at times. Everyone thought she was "manic" though she said it was ADD. Also, I myself have been like that *most* of the time, at least since I came out of my initial episode in 2004, but I admit I have been depressed at times, particularly during the recent job loss and shortly thereafter. It was almost as though I was making up for lost time by sleeping all the time, and I lost direction & motivation. But usually I'm at least somewhat hyper (though it's been curbed by medication) & I tend not to think I'm ever going to "come down."

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    Quote Originally Posted by stargazer
    Why is it that some people seem to stay "up" almost all the time & never come down? I worked with someone like that, and she was almost unbearable at times. Everyone thought she was "manic" though she said it was ADD.
    First, there are other conditions which can mimic at least some of the symptoms of hypomania, among them hyperthyroidism and I suppose possibly ADHD (hyperactive type) for some people.

    Second, there are great variations among people as to the number, frequency, and druation of hypomanic or manic episodes. For example, some well known musicians and composers have shown documented manic episodes lasting several months at a time.

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    I also wonder how much might be attributed to the "manic" person's desire to be out and about, with people to see, places to go, and things to do while the "depressed" person is more likely to draw into themselves and stay out of the public eye as much as possible.

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    That's good to know about the musicians and composers, as I have sometimes wondered if I held a record for the world's longest-running manic episode. Also, I think that what ThatLady says makes sense to me, in terms of the differences in people's temperaments and sensibilities.

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    Robert Schumann was one composer who had quite extended periods of mania and depression. Scientific American had an article several years ago where they documented his creative output against his depressive and manic phases and the correlation was quite striking.

    There are numerous other examples, of course, including Mahler, Handel, and probably Beethoven, although in Beethoven's case there have been other hypotheses about the origins of his mood swings, including lead poisoning.

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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    I read a biography of Schumann recently that said that his mental health problems were due to syphilus. I wasn't sure how that could be. At one point, he dove into the Rhine river in a suicide attempt and was rescued by boatmen. They said that they used mercury treatment on him, thought to be effective for syphilus, in the mental hospital, after which he died of mercury poisoning.

    Am curious if he had more output during his manic or depressive phases...

  10. #10
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    Re: Coming down from a hypomanic state and coping skills

    I thought that was Schubert who had syphilis... in any case, I think Schumann's bipolar was fairly well documented.

    In one year during a depressive phase, his total output for the year was 4 works; the following year, with a prolonged manic phase, it was in excess of 30 works.

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