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  1. #21
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    Re: Older may mean happier

    A Jungian perspective:

    “Thoroughly unprepared, we take the step into the afternoon of life. Worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and our ideals will serve us as hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the program of life’s morning, for what was great in the morning will be little at evening and what in the morning was true, at evening will have become a lie.”

    ― C.G. Jung
    Carl Jung writes that the afternoon of our lives represents the time when we begin to shift away from the ego being the dominant force in our life. We begin moving towards a life journey that has meaning. The morning of our lives is really occupied by ambition—getting as much as you can, collecting as much stuff as you can get, impressing as many people as you can, preparing yourself for a job, saving your money, setting goals, pleasing everybody, and doing the right thing. Even getting good grades in school revolved around the ego part of us, which really believes that who we are is what we do, what we get, and what other people think of us. That’s basically the essence of the ego. In the afternoon of your life, you don’t do life. You do what resonates with the callings of your soul.

    ― Wayne Dyer

  2. #22
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    Re: Older may mean happier

    I guess, older people regulate their emotions better. Judging by myself, if you don't have any excitement in life, you feel your life is more predictable and easier to handle? I know that people get wiser with age, so sorry for my previous comments.

    ---------- Post Merged at 05:01 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 04:47 PM ----------

    There are challenges the under 50 folks have to deal with that do not remain the same for older people. I believe, people have less stress after a certain age, when they don't have to make a career, raise kids and so on, but just focus on their own needs and desires. The differences are rather practical, not really character or life purpose changes. Wayne Dyer presents young people as almost immature at heart, and I don't understand him. There are quite impressive deeds committed by young people that are far away from the ego, from materialistic inspirations.

    ---------- Post Merged at 05:35 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 05:01 PM ----------

    I think, Carl Jung is talking exactly about reaching a level of maturity that is supposed to enrich our world view and makes us more content?

  3. #23
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    Re: Older may mean happier

    Wayne Dyer presents young people as almost immature at heart
    It is ripe with overgeneralizations. But it reminds me when I was a teenager and didn't care too much about helping around the house. Of course, there are 40-year-olds who do the same when they visit family now.

  4. #24
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    Re: Older may mean happier


    Younger generations are lonelier and social media doesn't help, survey finds


    Loneliness is on the rise and millennials and members of Generation Z are lonelier than older generations, according to a new survey. The Cigna 2020 Loneliness Index is based on a questionnaire answered by more than 10,400 people.

    The health insurance company said Thursday 61% of the adults surveyed reported they feel lonely, which is a seven percentage-point increase compared to 2018. It found men are slightly lonelier than women. But the biggest difference may be between generations. Nearly 79% of Gen Z respondents and 71% of millennials reported feeling lonely, compared to just half of the baby boomers.

    One major factor could be social media. The survey found instead of bringing people together, social media platforms have a "major impact" on loneliness and avid users were more likely to feel "alone, isolated, left out and without companionship."

    Loneliness is also impacting the workplace, especially younger employees. For example, Gen Z respondents said they are twice as likely as boomers to feel "abandoned" by co-workers when they're under pressure, and the majority of Gen Z workers feel "emotionally distant" from colleagues.

    Those feelings are impacting performance. Lonely workers said they're twice as likely to call out sick and five times as likely to miss work because of stress. Within the span of just one month, lonely workers said they think about quitting their job twice as often as their non-lonely co-workers.

    But making friends with colleagues, sharing more in-person conversations instead of online messages, and creating an environment where workers feel they can share their goals, were all shown to make a difference.

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