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  1. #11
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Quote Originally Posted by David Baxter View Post
    Does it bother you to have a diagnosis?
    How do you mean?


    Am I afraid to have the label of "mentally ill" following me around for the rest of my life?

  2. #12
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    By the way, if you live in Hennepin County, they seem to have one of the most progressive county mental health systems:

    Mental health relief without having to wait | Star Tribune

    In any case, you seem to be living in a good area for accessing mental health services. Usually, the key is using them before it becomes a crisis since prevention is always better.
    Last edited by Retired; March 22nd, 2018 at 03:35 PM. Reason: Url Edit

  3. #13
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy H. View Post
    How do you mean?

    Am I afraid to have the label of "mentally ill" following me around for the rest of my life?
    "Mentally ill" is not a diagnosis.

    "Generalized Anxiety Disorder" is a diagnosis. So is "Social Anxiety Disorder" or "Panic Disorder".

  4. #14
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Quote Originally Posted by David Baxter View Post
    "Mentally ill" is not a diagnosis.

    "Generalized Anxiety Disorder" is a diagnosis. So is "Social Anxiety Disorder" or "Panic Disorder".
    I don't know. I guess I would like to have some sort of definition for why I have irrational actions like I do (staying inside when someone is outside that I do - or in some cases don't - want to avoid). I'd like to have some answers to that.

  5. #15
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    By the way, with any anxiety disorder, the resulting chronic avoidance becomes a habit in and of itself. So the disorder takes on a life of its own, such as with self-reinforcing habits leading to a depressing lifestyle. So even little changes, such as with cognitive behavior therapy, can have a big positive impact over time.

    An example of behavior therapy for anxiety:

    FEAR

    Do what you are afraid of doing....OVER AND OVER AND OVER.
    Approach events, places, tasks, activities, people you are afraid of.
    Do things to give yourself a sense of CONTROL and MASTERY.
    When overwhelmed, make a list of small steps or tasks you can do. DO the first thing on the list.

    Opposite Action

  6. #16
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Similarly:

    Quote Originally Posted by David Baxter
    No, you're not "to blame" for your anxiety any more than you are "to blame" for your hair color or eye color.

    But depending on how you react to anxiety triggers, you can either make the anxiety better or worse - that in fact is the basis for cognitive behavior therapy (CBT).

    Am I to blame for my anxiety?

  7. #17
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    This fellow seems to sort of be describing some of the issues I'm having. I don't know how to navigate this page so I can't see what the original poster was saying/asking.


    As the son and former caretaker of someone with extreme mental illness, I feel I should weigh in here.

    What you describe sounds similar to mind catatonia or catatonic state, sometime considered a form of schizophrenia, though this is dependent upon other comorbid symptoms.

    Have you talked with psycho-therapist or psychiatrist regarding this problem? If so, what was their suggestions? What, if any, was their diagnosis?

    I don't believe this is something that can simply be handled like a bad habit that needs to be broken... neurological disorders don't often respond well to being handled in that way.

    Nor do I agree with the suggestion to 'deliberately look people in the eyes'. While this is generally considered a body-language descriptor action of 'honesty' when one is engaged in discussion, at a more primal level, it's considered aggressive, sort of akin to a dog staring down another dog. At the primal level of the mind, staring makes people uncomfortable for this exact reason, and so inappropriate eye contact can actually illicit a violent response from someone that is, for example, mentally attuned to their instincts more than to conscious thought.

    The suggestion of sunglasses is a good one actually, especially if these episodes occur without you realizing that it's about to happen. At least your eyes would be concealed and make others less uncomfortable, which I believe is what you were asking.

    The reality of problems like this are that while they can be managed, there's no real cure or even a treatment that will abate the behavior if the behaviour has an underlying subconscious trigger mechanism. First, the underlying condition causing or leading to the undesirable behavior will need to be addressed, which in turn will lead to a better understanding of yourself, and what leads to these episodes... what triggers the 'blank state', as you've described it.

    It's not the first I've heard of this condition though... friends of mine used to call it 'zoning out', but really, I think it's more than that... I think one becomes so immersed in their thoughts that ocular stimuli processing by the brain takes backseat to what the brain is otherwise focused on.
    How to deal with my disorder so that I dont make other people uncomfortable - Quora


    The bolded above literally seems like they're describing what I go through.

  8. #18
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Some of the other responses there seemed more appropriate, e.g. normalizing.

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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel View Post
    Some of the other responses there seemed more appropriate, e.g. normalizing.
    The "Zoning out" thing - some times when I'm looking someone in the eyes or something or whatever...I've never been able to articulate what happens but some times I can just feel peoples' stomachs turn. It's like I'm looking at a ghost or when they are looking into my eyes they are looking at a ghost or looking into my soul or something.


    I just wish I could articulate what they hell is going on with me. To this day I can't...going on 25 years now.

  10. #20
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    Re: Catatonia in those with ASD

    Roy, seriously, if this concerns you request a referral to a qualified mental health practitioner. Trying to diagnose yourself online is pointless and will do nothing for you except increase your anxiety. This is one area where Google is NOT your friend.

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