More threads by bbjjre

bbjjre

Member
Does anyone have any information concerning the safety of antidepressants or anti anxiety medication during pregnancy, especially during the mid second trimester? I realize in regards to anxiety medication that lorazepam and clonazepam are a category D therefore I would not feel comfortable taking these but are most anti depressants a category D as well?
 

HA

Member
Hello BB,

Good question but please be sure to ask your Dr. or pharmacist before making any personal decisions. Here is a PDF booklet that talks about risks during pregnancy of most prescriptions for mental health as well as over the counter and drugs of addiction. Clink the link below:

Is It Safe for My Baby


I tried to copy the part about antidepressants but it gets too scrambled so is difficult to do. It's easy for you to scroll to that section though.
 

bbjjre

Member
Oh I already have talked to my doctor and he has prescribed clonazepam and he was going to prescribe an antidepressant and I told him to hold off because I wanted to do research first. I don't feel comfortable taking anything during pregnancy that I don't research on my own first.

Thanks for the link :)
 
Last edited:

Retired

Member
When you know the name of the medication your physician wants to prescribe, your best resource is to read the product monograph pertinent to your Country.

Canadian and U.S. monographs are essentially the same, but are by no means interchangeable.

The monographs are listed on the websites of most pharmaceutical manufacturers' websites.

If you need help to locate a monograph, let us know and we can point you to it...and most likely post a copy here on the Forum as a pdf file.

My understanding of the current clinical strategy followed by specialists is to weigh the benefits and risks of continuing to medicate Mom during pregnancy.

I would suggest seeking the opinion of the Obstetrician as well as a Psychiatrist before making a final decision.
 

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