More threads by Cat Dancer

How could I respond to someone who tells me that depression is strictly a result of sin in my life and that anti-depressants are "worthless" and they "really do not work" and that they just "zonk you out?"

I KNOW I'm not perfect and that I have lots and lots of personal problems and issues that I'm trying to deal with, but I'm not sure how to respond to something like this.
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
I think I would be tempted to reply, "I don't mean to be rude but you really have no idea what you're talking about."
 
yeah.

I just mess up so much. I KNOW that I do. And I'm really trying hard to fix myself, change the way I think, not be so sad, accept responsibility for my faults and be realistic about myself. It's not a pretty picture.

I can only go on though. I can't go back. None of us can go back and undo our mistakes or change the past.

To me, taking medication is NOT a sign of weakness, or sin or whatever. I think it is brave to realize that you need help and ask for it. Not saying the medication solves everything, but I don't think it's bad. If that makes any sense. I just wish I could be brave to say that outloud.
 

RBM

Member
If it's someone open to listening you could do some research and present proof on how medication has helped people or possibly have that person talk to a professional and have them explain it.

Sometimes people just won't be receptive no matter what you say and you need to find satisfaction in saying your piece then accepting that others won't agree.(this is something I'm trying to work on)
 
RBM said:
Sometimes people just won't be receptive no matter what you say and you need to find satisfaction in saying your piece then accepting that others won't agree.(this is something I'm trying to work on)

That's true and thanks for the advice.

I'm trying to work on that too.
 

ThatLady

Member
I'm with Dr. Baxter. I'd tell the person they were talking through their hat and had no clue what they are talking about. When they get a PhD or an MD, I'd be happy to listen to them with regard to medications for such things as depression.
 

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