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    "There is no better exercise for your heart than reaching down and helping to lift someone up."
    Bernard Meltzer, posted by HBas

Daniel

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The Scientific Reports study presents “exciting new evidence that dogs’ unusual ability to cooperate and communicate with us evolved as a result of natural selection favoring wolves who could approach and eventually show friendly behavior toward humans,” says Brian Hare, a Duke University evolutionary anthropologist, who was not involved in the study.
 

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What is more certain is that canines have no concept of the future. However, the AKC's Dr. Burch remains convinced "they have an amazing sense of time" with regard to their schedules and daily activities...

"The behavioral issue of separation anxiety is somewhat related to time. Even though dogs may not be thinking of the passage of minutes, as they are alone for an increasing number of minutes, they may become more anxious.

"The most effective treatment for separation anxiety involves stepping outside for only a second or two, and immediately returning...
 
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Ingredients​

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound ground chicken, turkey or beef (the more lean the better)
  • 1 cup brown rice, rinsed for about 90 seconds
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 cups of a frozen vegetable medley. I used cauliflower florets, broccoli florets, carrots and peas (just make sure the pieces are small enough so your dog won't have any trouble chewing).
 

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Ingredients​

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound ground chicken, turkey or beef (the more lean the better)
  • 1 cup brown rice, rinsed for about 90 seconds
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 cups of a frozen vegetable medley. I used cauliflower florets, broccoli florets, carrots and peas (just make sure the pieces are small enough so your dog won't have any trouble chewing).


Instant Pot recipe with chicken breasts and even blueberries:

Easy DIY Dog Food You Can Make in Your Instant Pot


Ingredients
  • Chicken breast 2 breast
  • Carrots 2 stalks
  • Green beans 1 cup
  • Sweet potatoes 1 med
  • Brown Rice 1 cup
  • Blueberry 1 cup
  • Peas 1/2 cup
  • Parsley for garnish
  • Water 2 cups
 

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Forgetting to microchip your pup​

Priority number one after getting a new dog, whether puppy or rescue, should be making sure they can find their way back home if he or she ever gets lost. Over 10 million pets are lost every year and it happens to even the most responsible dog owners! The best way to protect your pup is to get it microchipped, says Aimee Gilbreath, executive director at the Michelson Found Animals Foundation. These small chips that are implanted in the folds of the skin in your pup’s shoulders hold a unique ID number that connects with your contact info (i.e. your phone number) that you supply online. It’s not a GPS tracker. Many shelters will offer inexpensive microchips or you can ask your vet about microchipping options, she says.
 

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Some animal hospitals also have one that lets certain microchip readers check your dog's or cat's temperature, but my pets were already chipped:


Bio-Thermo is a new generation of identification microchip with an integrated temperature biosensor, that is available for all pets not microchipped yet. This enables a pet’s temperature and identification number to be read simultaneously.

By using an adapted reader, multiple temperature values can be collected very easily.

Microchip Temperature is not a replacement for rectal temperature.
 
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Similar advice to "a busy chicken is a happy chicken":


If you’re gone 12 hours a day, and your dog’s walk consists of a quick dash into the backyard, you’re not providing your pet with adequate opportunities to use up all his energy. Instead, the excess will go into chewing your shoes, stealing your food, or scratching your walls. As the old saying goes, “A tired dog is a good dog.”
 
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The existing research shows that the restrictive, delaying policies of most private animal rescues do not provide better outcomes than simply communicating with potential adopters (like most local humane societies or shelters do with same-visit adoptions).

When I adopted from a private rescue, they did:

~ A criminal background check

~ A property records check to verify I owned my own home (if you rent, they will call your landlord instead)

~ An application with distrustful questions -- like "What brand of food would you provide?"

I was actually lucky. Some rescues require an inspection of your home, which delays things even further.

Meanwhile, many of the people who volunteer at rescues would not technically qualify to adopt from their own organization, such as from not having a fenced yard for a dog.

To me, it's a classic problem of loss aversion. Generally, private rescues are too worried about what may go wrong than about the countless homeless pets outside their doors (and any competition with dog/cat breeders who don't ask any questions).

I have changed my views about rescues vs. shelters. I prefer to donate to a local rescue now, partly since they are the nearest animal welfare organization, and I have a better appreciation of why they seem picky.

My local rescue even offered to temporarily board the kitten I adopted for free at any point in his lifetime if I ever got sick or went on vacation. The rescue kitten was so well taken care of by the rescue, that she was greatly missed by the volunteers.

Some shelters though are better than others, with more room for each dog, including outside, and more fostering than sheltering.
 
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A dog that’s had heatstroke once is always going to be at risk, since one of the functions that’s affected by high body temperatures is the brain’s heat-sensor system. It gets shorted out by the high heat and is less likely to send signals to pant and get out of the heat the next time the temp goes up. It’s like a cruel joke.

Betsy was a pug, a member of a family of dogs called brachycephalics, which means “short head.” Since their noses and upper airways are so short, they can’t exchange heat the way dogs with longer snouts can. Bulldogs and Pekingese are also brachycephalic, and any dog of this body type is extremely sensitive to heatstroke. If I see a bulldog out on a sunny day, I worry.
 

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Want me to learn to walk by your side on a leash?​

Well, give me some incentive. As soon as I start to pull ahead, stop walking. When I turn and look back, offer me a treat right next to your leg. I’ll quickly figure out I need to stay next to you in order to keep doing what I love most: moving and exploring.
 

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Dogs descended from wolves, and we all know wolves hunt for their food. It’s this predator and prey relationship that attracts dogs to squeak toys.

The squeak in the toy sounds like an animal that is injured or scared. This sound sparks your dog’s inner drive to attack. Once the toy stops squeaking (aka, your dog has broken the squeaker), it tells your dog that it has successfully “killed” its prey and it no longer needs to attack.

A very popular line of squeaky toys with almost 53,000 reviews:

 

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Your panting pooch needs some relief from the summer heat and a wading pool is one of the best ways to keep your dog cool during the summer. He can splash in it, or treat it like the doggie equivalent of a Venti Caramel Frapp from Starbucks.

BarkBox is a great dog toy company with great reviews (and even Walmart sells their toys).

They have a great summer deal (and they do seem to ship to Canada):



Screen Shot 2022-07-28 at 9.02.41 AM.jpg

Screen Shot 2022-07-28 at 9.03.06 AM.jpg

I subscribed to their annual Super Chewer plan (at $30/month) for my large dog (since those are the only toys they sell that he can't destroy):
  • BarkBox: 1 Month: $35, 6 Months: $26, 12 Months: $23
  • Super Chewer: 1 Month: $45, 6 Months: $35, 12 Months: $30
  • BARK Bright Dental: 1 Month: $31, 6 Months: $26
The other reason I get the Super Chewer subscription is because those toys are relatively unavailable at Walmart.
 
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Even my picky dogs like tofu, even uncooked. Cooking it with scrambled eggs or mixing it with wet dog food is an easy way to add vegetable protein to their diet.


"Tofu is made from squeezed soy curd, which is entirely safe for your dog. In addition, tofu is manufactured using a procedure that incorporates several critical vitamins and minerals, such as iron, zinc, and magnesium, making it even healthier for dogs than other kinds of soy protein."

"Tofu has minimal carbohydrate, calorie, and fat content. Therefore, a tiny quantity of tofu mixed into an obese dog’s usual meal for low-calorie bulk may help him lose weight. Tofu is also rich in fiber, so it will likely make a dog feel fuller after meals."
 
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