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Diana

Member
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
297
Points
16
Hi. I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question. Does anyone know different causes of receding gums? I know that gum disease is a cause, but what if your gums are not inflamed and don't bleed or hurt you? I know that brushing your teeth the wrong way can also cause receding gums. However, I've changed my toothbrush and the method of brushing my teeth and they're not getting better. I wondered if having an eating disorder in the past could be a cause. I wasn't bulimic, but perhaps lack of nutrition could have made it worse. However, it seems that this problem began as far back as high school - before I ever had an eating disorder. The dentists never said anything about it, except for at my last appointment when he told me to change how I brush.
I'm also wondering if anyone has heard of The Smile Method. It's supposed to be a natural way of getting rid of bacteria that causes gums to recede. I was thinking of giving it a try, because it's inexpensive and you make the solutions yourself. Please let me know if you've heard of this or know of anyone who's tried it. Thanks!
 

Diana

Member
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
297
Points
16
Hi. I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question. Does anyone know different causes of receding gums? I know that gum disease is a cause, but what if your gums are not inflamed and don't bleed or hurt you? I know that brushing your teeth the wrong way can also cause receding gums. However, I've changed my toothbrush and the method of brushing my teeth and they're not getting better. I wondered if having an eating disorder in the past could be a cause. I wasn't bulimic, but perhaps lack of nutrition could have made it worse. However, it seems that this problem began as far back as high school - before I ever had an eating disorder. The dentists never said anything about it, except for at my last appointment when he told me to change how I brush.
I'm also wondering if anyone has heard of The Smile Method. It's supposed to be a natural way of getting rid of bacteria that causes gums to recede. I was thinking of giving it a try, because it's inexpensive and you make the solutions yourself. Please let me know if you've heard of this or know of anyone who's tried it. Thanks!
 

Daniel

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However, I've changed my toothbrush and the method of brushing my teeth and they're not getting better.

Do you mean they are staying the same or getting worse? Receding gums don't grow back, which is why surgery is indicated if the condition becomes much worse over time. It's also easier to brush correctly (with the slightest pressure, brushing in a circular fashion) when using an electric toothbrush with a sonic or rotating brush head.

To prevent too much bacteria from forming, you want to basically have an anti-gingivitis regimen.

To prevent gingivitis, the following have been recommended to me by my dental hygienist:

- flossing once a day
- using an anti-gingivitis rinse like Listerine (or its generic equivalent) twice a day. (She recommends diluting the Listerine in water -- 25% Listerine, 75% water -- so that the solution will be gentler on the gum tissue while still being effective.)
- brushing twice a day

I also try to use a WaterPik once a day since a WaterPik can irrigate places that flossing cannot reach.

If your teeth are currently sensitive due to receding gums or gingivitis, you can use a toothpaste for sensitive teeth.

Of course, you should continue to get dental cleanings every 6 months.

Also:

Taking care of your teeth keeps receding gums at bay
What makes your gums recede? The cause is usually dental plaque, that sticky substance that builds up on your teeth and all the areas in between.

Plaque is made up of millions of bacteria left in your mouth from the foods and beverages that you consume. Plaque produces toxins that irritate your gums.

Without proper oral hygiene and professional care, plaque can accumulate and cause your gums to pull back from your teeth. This can lead to "pockets" within the gums that hold even more bacteria. If left untreated, the result can be abscesses and tooth loss.

Tobacco doesn't help, either. Besides causing lung cancer, oral cancer and other diseases, tobacco increases the likelihood of having plaque and tartar deposits on your teeth. If you're a smoker or chewer, you're more likely to suffer from gum disease and slower to heal after a tooth extraction or oral surgery.

Don't let your gums recede. Be diligent and consistent about brushing and flossing, cut out the tobacco, and see your dentist for regular check-ups.

ADA News Update: Taking care of your teeth keeps receding gums at bay

The American Dental Association also has online videos on receding gums and other topics.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,134
Points
113
However, I've changed my toothbrush and the method of brushing my teeth and they're not getting better.

Do you mean they are staying the same or getting worse? Receding gums don't grow back, which is why surgery is indicated if the condition becomes much worse over time. It's also easier to brush correctly (with the slightest pressure, brushing in a circular fashion) when using an electric toothbrush with a sonic or rotating brush head.

To prevent too much bacteria from forming, you want to basically have an anti-gingivitis regimen.

To prevent gingivitis, the following have been recommended to me by my dental hygienist:

- flossing once a day
- using an anti-gingivitis rinse like Listerine (or its generic equivalent) twice a day. (She recommends diluting the Listerine in water -- 25% Listerine, 75% water -- so that the solution will be gentler on the gum tissue while still being effective.)
- brushing twice a day

I also try to use a WaterPik once a day since a WaterPik can irrigate places that flossing cannot reach.

If your teeth are currently sensitive due to receding gums or gingivitis, you can use a toothpaste for sensitive teeth.

Of course, you should continue to get dental cleanings every 6 months.

Also:

Taking care of your teeth keeps receding gums at bay
What makes your gums recede? The cause is usually dental plaque, that sticky substance that builds up on your teeth and all the areas in between.

Plaque is made up of millions of bacteria left in your mouth from the foods and beverages that you consume. Plaque produces toxins that irritate your gums.

Without proper oral hygiene and professional care, plaque can accumulate and cause your gums to pull back from your teeth. This can lead to "pockets" within the gums that hold even more bacteria. If left untreated, the result can be abscesses and tooth loss.

Tobacco doesn't help, either. Besides causing lung cancer, oral cancer and other diseases, tobacco increases the likelihood of having plaque and tartar deposits on your teeth. If you're a smoker or chewer, you're more likely to suffer from gum disease and slower to heal after a tooth extraction or oral surgery.

Don't let your gums recede. Be diligent and consistent about brushing and flossing, cut out the tobacco, and see your dentist for regular check-ups.

ADA News Update: Taking care of your teeth keeps receding gums at bay

The American Dental Association also has online videos on receding gums and other topics.
 

just mary

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2004
Messages
754
Points
16
Hi,

I have had problems with my gums over the last few years also, I'm 36. My dentist told me that it could be due to a few things, such as:

1. I could be grinding my teeth in my sleep which may be causing stress on my jaw and gums.

2. I have an underbite, i.e. my lower jaw kind of "sticks out" - it's the opposite of an overbite and that may be causing stress on my gums.

3. It could be genetic, my Dad lost all of his teeth by the time he was forty (but I think that was due to poor dental hygiene).

I was never really given a definitive answer. In the end, I had some work done and was basically told to keep flossing and brushing daily.

Hope this helps and take care.
 

just mary

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2004
Messages
754
Points
16
Hi,

I have had problems with my gums over the last few years also, I'm 36. My dentist told me that it could be due to a few things, such as:

1. I could be grinding my teeth in my sleep which may be causing stress on my jaw and gums.

2. I have an underbite, i.e. my lower jaw kind of "sticks out" - it's the opposite of an overbite and that may be causing stress on my gums.

3. It could be genetic, my Dad lost all of his teeth by the time he was forty (but I think that was due to poor dental hygiene).

I was never really given a definitive answer. In the end, I had some work done and was basically told to keep flossing and brushing daily.

Hope this helps and take care.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,134
Points
113
I could be grinding my teeth in my sleep which may be causing stress on my jaw and gums.

Someone I know had this problem when his anxiety was severe, so he got a dental NightGuard at the cheapest place in town (Walmart).
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
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Messages
19,134
Points
113
Why Do Most People Brush Too Hard ?

Some studies indicate the percentage of people who apply too much brushing pressure to be as high as 66% . Usually we brush too hard for one of two reasons:

We don't realize how much brushing pressure is too much pressure:
No one ever taught us how to brush with the right amount of pressure. Consequently, even if we think that we are brushing softly, we are often, in fact applying far too much pressure, damaging teeth and gums in the process.

We feel that the harder we brush, the cleaner our teeth will become:
This is a common misperception. The goal of brushing is to remove plaque bacteria. Plaque bacteria is very easily removed with the slightest of brushing pressure. When we brush harder we do not remove more plaque, just damage teeth and gums. What's more important than how hard we brush is that we brush all of our tooth surfaces. It takes nearly 3 minutes to do this; most people spend less than 30 seconds brushing their teeth.

http://www.saveyoursmile.com/healthygums/brushingaway.html
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,134
Points
113
Why Do Most People Brush Too Hard ?

Some studies indicate the percentage of people who apply too much brushing pressure to be as high as 66% . Usually we brush too hard for one of two reasons:

We don't realize how much brushing pressure is too much pressure:
No one ever taught us how to brush with the right amount of pressure. Consequently, even if we think that we are brushing softly, we are often, in fact applying far too much pressure, damaging teeth and gums in the process.

We feel that the harder we brush, the cleaner our teeth will become:
This is a common misperception. The goal of brushing is to remove plaque bacteria. Plaque bacteria is very easily removed with the slightest of brushing pressure. When we brush harder we do not remove more plaque, just damage teeth and gums. What's more important than how hard we brush is that we brush all of our tooth surfaces. It takes nearly 3 minutes to do this; most people spend less than 30 seconds brushing their teeth.

http://www.saveyoursmile.com/healthygums/brushingaway.html
 

Diana

Member
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
297
Points
16
Thanks for all the responses. I just recently heard that grinding your teeth could cause the gums to recede. My ex boyfriend who I was with about 3 years ago, told me that I grinded my teeth in my sleep. The boyfriend who I'm with now (we live together) doesn't notice that. However, he is more of a deep sleeper. I'm wondering if it's also hereditary because my Mom had the same problem, which started long ago. She seemed to practice good dental hygene, and the dentists never knew why this happened. She recently had two crowns put in. I think I definitely brushed to hard - maybe all of my life. I'm just wondering if there is something else involved - such as bacteria under the gumline. I don't have any symptoms of infection. I guess I should go back to the dentist again and get a second opinion just to make sure.
By the way, I heard or read that it is possible for receding gums to grow back somewhat, but that there is no guarantee as to how much, if at all. I even read that bone loss on the tooth can be reversed, but probably not back to it's original state if at all. Anyway, I'm going to check out some of the websites you posted, so thanks again.
 

Diana

Member
Joined
May 26, 2005
Messages
297
Points
16
Thanks for all the responses. I just recently heard that grinding your teeth could cause the gums to recede. My ex boyfriend who I was with about 3 years ago, told me that I grinded my teeth in my sleep. The boyfriend who I'm with now (we live together) doesn't notice that. However, he is more of a deep sleeper. I'm wondering if it's also hereditary because my Mom had the same problem, which started long ago. She seemed to practice good dental hygene, and the dentists never knew why this happened. She recently had two crowns put in. I think I definitely brushed to hard - maybe all of my life. I'm just wondering if there is something else involved - such as bacteria under the gumline. I don't have any symptoms of infection. I guess I should go back to the dentist again and get a second opinion just to make sure.
By the way, I heard or read that it is possible for receding gums to grow back somewhat, but that there is no guarantee as to how much, if at all. I even read that bone loss on the tooth can be reversed, but probably not back to it's original state if at all. Anyway, I'm going to check out some of the websites you posted, so thanks again.
 

tiadesai

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2005
Messages
7
Points
1
Gums

do follow some basic steps like brushing atleast twice a day
gargling prpoperly after every meal and dont let food stick between your teeth
try some antibacterial liquid
there are many available in the market
gargle for 20 seconds and then spit out
 

tiadesai

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2005
Messages
7
Points
1
Gums

do follow some basic steps like brushing atleast twice a day
gargling prpoperly after every meal and dont let food stick between your teeth
try some antibacterial liquid
there are many available in the market
gargle for 20 seconds and then spit out
 

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