More threads by wren1187

wren1187

Member
I'm not sure if this thread belongs in this area of the forum or not. Does anyone know anything about Narcissistic people? It's sort of the opposite of loathing your image.

My little sister has many psychological problems, and I recently realized that she loves her reflection more than is normal. I was trying to change the background on her comp. to a certain pic, but i couldn't find that pic 'cause there were thousands of pics and all were of her! She has a picture of herself in every piece of clothing she owns, from every possible angle, and wearing every possible expression! She has pics of herself printed and taped to her wall! She has a low self-esteem normally, and if there is a mirror around she's hooked. When I thought about it I realized that she has always loved looking at herself in mirrors. When she was only 3 or 4 you couldn't talk to her with a in mirror around because she wouldn't pay any attention to you.

I'm fairly certain this isn't normal. It's like some sort of confidence fallback or something. Then, being 13, how bad can you look? I've looked it up and couldn't find anything on the topic. Any ideas?
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
Someone under the age of 18 cannot be diagnosed with a personality disorder, recognizing the fact that the personality (and the brain) is still growing and evolving in younger people, and that younger people do tend to be more egocentric and self-centred than most adults.

However, the following lists the criteria for Narcisisstic Personality:

Diagnostic criteria for 301.81 Narcissistic Personality Disorder

A pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:

(1) has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements)

(2) is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love

(3) believes that he or she is "special" and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions)

(4) requires excessive admiration

(5) has a sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations

(6) is interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or her own ends

(7) lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the feelings and needs of others

(8) is often envious of others or believes that others are envious of him or her

(9) shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes
 

braveheart

Member
My experience [from father, myself, others, reading and study...] is that narcissism can be rooted in having a very poor self image, and the narcissism is to compensate for that. Its like the balance of superiority-inferiority complexes. Like you say, the confidence fallback. But like David says, 13 is still very young. She's probably still trying to figure out who she is and who she wants to be, and trying to come to terms with her changing body and feelings...
 

wren1187

Member
Thanks for the advice. Maybe I don't have anything to worry about... yet. It's just one of her less obvious problems. Half our family has mental illnesses, and she seems to have inherited some... my worst fear all my life was instead passed on to her, which isn't any better. Hopefully, I'm worrying for no reason. Well, I guess i am worrying for no reason 'cause worry doesn't ever help anything. Anyway, thanks.
 

Miette

Member
I wonder if, rather than admiring her appearance, she is worrying about how she appears to other people, hence all the pictures showing different poses and facial expressions, and how she looks in all her different outfits-to avoid an outfit or pose that would be a faux pas. I remember studying pictures of myself when I was that age, to make sure that I looked "acceptable."
 

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