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    "The voice of negativity says, 'Get real'. The voice of possibility says 'Get started'."
    Donna Satchell, posted by littlerabbit
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:panic:I dont want to die but I keep getting these obsessive suicidal thoughts. I have talked to a therapist about this but it makes no sense. I am happy and love life but I keep getting thoughts like what if I (act on those thoughts)? I do have OCD which is a real pain-so am I the only one like this?
 
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I have OCD and I have obsessive self destructive thoughts as well. Therapy and medication help. CBT work helps. Saying "Oh, there's that OCD thought again. Just a thought. No big deal" and kind of going on about my business helps.

You're not alone.
 

Daniel

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Yes, me too, and it is also listed here at the very top of this list of common OCD obsessions:
 

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Not anymore, but for most of my life it was all day every day. They consumed all my time, all my thoughts.

It took a lot of work but I did manage to get rid of them. I have the occasional thought still but maybe only once a week or so, and very fleeting.
 

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Luvox helped a lot with the thoughts, but not the depression. So, I took Luvox for about four months to help get the thoughts under control, and then went back on Cipralex to get the depression back under control. Then I attacked them like mad with self-taught CBT skills. And I didn't give up, no matter what.
 

Daniel

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Also, I like DBT for dealing with habitual avoidance behaviors like ruminating. (For people with OCD, ruminating is a common, maladaptive way of trying to cope with obsessive thoughts.)

But as Cat Dancer was saying, regarding obsessive thoughts per se:

When you have such unsolicited ghoulish mental activity, it's very understandable that you want to get rid of it. Typically, however, the harder you try to rid yourself of such thoughts and images, the more they take hold...When you put effort into preventing or eliminating a certain thought, you're inadvertently focusing more attention on it.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy For ... - Rhena Branch, Rob Willson - Google Books
A helpful metaphor I use to describe intrusive obsessions is to liken them to pop-up ads we often encounter while surfing the Web. Just like pop-up ads, obsessions are not under our control; they are always unwanted, and always annoying. Just as importantly, though, is for clients to realize that getting better emotionally does not depend on eliminating obsessions, which, in fact, is unnecessary, even perhaps, unattainable...

http://forum.psychlinks.ca/obsessiv...hose-darned-unwanted-thoughts.html#post192148
Part of response prevention involves focusing on whatever little enjoyment is present and learning to enjoy the 20 to 40% that can still get through despite your obsessing...The ultimate goal of treatment is to be able to enjoy the present for what it is.

http://forum.psychlinks.ca/obsessiv...lest-obsession-obsessing-about-obsessing.html
 
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In other words let other thoughts enter your mind and drown out the old obsessive thoughts. Dont freak out b/c you are having obsessive thoughts.

My obsessive thoughts are of suicide. I would never act on it-it is just a thought that keeps returning. Is this theme typical with OCD?
 

David Baxter

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In other words let other thoughts enter your mind and drown out the old obsessive thoughts. Dont freak out b/c you are having obsessive thoughts.

My obsessive thoughts are of suicide. I would never act on it-it is just a thought that keeps returning. Is this theme typical with OCD?

Yes. Very common indeed. Acknowledge the thoughts - don't fight them. Then just say to yourself, "These are just thoughts. OCD thoughts. They are not facts. They are not wishes. They are not predictions. They are just annoying intrusive OCD thoughts. Let them go past. I don't have to do anything at all about them. They don't mean anything. They are just OCD thoughts."
 

jinn

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one of my best friend had OCD. she said it was a hard time. but she was around by friends and family. so be open to people who love you. everything is gonna be fine.:)
 

michavalos

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one of my best friend had OCD. she said it was a hard time. but she was around by friends and family. so be open to people who love you. everything is gonna be fine.:)

yeah, friends especially the family are the one who will care for us the most, if we have problems, opening it up to the family is a best way, they would feel for you.
 

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