• Quote of the Day
    "There comes a point when you either embrace who and what you are, or condemn yourself to be miserable all your days.
    Other people will try to make you miserable; don’t help them by doing the job yourself"
    Laurell K. Hamilton, posted by David Baxter

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
I do not know if this the correct spot to ask for comments...today being the first time I have seen this website. I am not even sure questions such as I have are even discussed openly here. Obviously doctors (and others) do not prescribe therapy etc in this venue....but I am obliged to at least pose my question.
I am perplexed by an almost complete change in personalty of my 36 year old daughter. She has gone from a mother of two girls who spent too much on them etc etc to someone who is on the verge of breaking up her marriage (to a good man)..to hanging out with what we consider to be undesirable moral types (including some jerk of a man) ....to squandering large sums of money and not responsing to attempts to talk to her abaout what is going on. Her mother has tried and tried and even goes so far as to say "i don't know her anymore."
Needless to say we are all at wit's end........we wonder about mental illness of some sort....we cannot think of any other rational reasons for such a change in a person. We also wonder if gambling and/or drug usage coculd be involved.
We are starting to consider a "family intervention" and even a so-called "health warrant". We feel she needs some kind of help for sure.
Does anyone have any comments?? We are getting desperate. We just do not understand.
Thank you all for reading this and ANY response would be most welcome.
Dodger
 

AVC

Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
78
Points
6
She could be involved in a second childhood situation, maybe drug abuse in this circle of new friends is causing this.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
38,077
Points
113
Substance abuse may be a possibility, yes.

Another very real possibility could be a hypomanic episode in bipolar disorder. And there are a few others that come to mind.

However, the sad reality is there is probably little or nothing that you can do about it until or unless she gets to the point where she acknowledges that there is a problem or something that she wishes to change.
 

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
The change in personality has not been a fleeting sort of thing but has been ongoing at least for the past few months. Does that sort of scenario sound In very general terms, of course) similar to the mentioned hypomanic episode or would that be more of a "now and again" sort of situation?
She won't talk about how things have become......."people should mind their own business" is how she has phrased her feelings. But her two kids ARE our business.....we worry about them.
Thank you...Dodger
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
38,077
Points
113
It could be, Dodger. The parameters vary quite a bit from one individual to another. Sometimes, a hypomanic episode is quite short-lived; in other cases, it can last several weeks or months.

As for the children, I assume their father is their to look after their interests? If not, you could involve the CAS and perhaps even request interim custody.
 

HA

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
1,516
Points
36
Hello Dodger,

With the possibility that your loved one may have or is developing an illness, it is recommended to keep a record with dates and specific behaviours. You can forget things over time and it gives you some indication of patterns or time frames.

Include all observations by family, friends and coworkers:

Eating patterns
Sleeping patterns
Odd behaviours
Odd things she says
Anything else you think is important

Depending on where you live there are different support groups for family members of people with mood disorders that you can attend. You don't need a diagnosis in a family member to attend. There you will get all of the support you need about how to best handle the situation with your daughter.

In the US there is NAMI and in Canada there is the Mood Disorders Society of Canada. Each of these will have a group close to where you live.

I have an exhusband who has bipolar and a son who has schizophrenia and am very involved with support groups. Things will get worked out somehow with your daughter.

:hug:
 

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
Thank you for your encouraging words...we have been at our wit's end for some time now. Every emotion in the book..from anger, hurt, disappointment, etc etc
Thank you again
Dodger
 

HA

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
1,516
Points
36
It is a very painful and confusing thing to go through, Dodger. We all go through the same range of emotions. Whatever you are feeling is perfectly normal.

What can help to deal with really bizarre behaviour is to see it as an illness that is behaving strangely rather than the person who is behaving strangely. Then you can be really angry at the illness and feel more compassion for the person. This has helped me get through many difficult times.

It is not uncommon for people to notice that something is just not right with their loved one... then, a very long time can pass before the person gets a diagnosis or the help they need.

Keep looking for answers and you will eventually find them.

:grouphug:
 

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
Thank you HeartArt.....I must say that your words of experience have had a soothing affact on my emotions. My wife has preceeded me somewhat in sorting things out and has had less of a "sour feeling" of late about our daughter and more concern about the supposed disease, if that is what it is. Our daughter has never been onme to "talk" much and she won't now. Her cousin (my wife's sister's daughter) said Friday it is the first time in their mutual lives (she and my fdaughter) have not been able to talk and confide in each other. She wants to help also...(she is a real sweetheart) but how CAN we help??
I know you understand....it helps to "speak" with someone like yourself..we have felt so alone. For some reason your words have seemed to reach me..........and as well I am very appreciative of the doctor's comments. A website such as this one is a blessing.
Thank you very much....to all
Dodger
 
Joined
Jun 11, 2006
Messages
5,390
Points
36
i just wanted to wish you good luck with the situation and i hope that you can find support and help locally to deal with this.
 

HA

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
1,516
Points
36
Well, you are most definitely not alone, Doger. One of the reasons for feeling so alone when dealing with a possible mental illness is that we don't know anything about mental illnesses until it hits close to home. You can't know what no one has told you.

The past number of years have been better with our society being less afraid and more open to publicly talk about it. You see more general tv shows dealing with the topic and more people including celebrities being open about mental illness. The psychlinks website makes a difference through public education.

Mental illness is just as common as physical illness. It is a part of being human. It was not many years ago that people would not talk about cancer. That's hard to imagine now, isn't it?

When someone in our family has symptoms of mental illness, we go through various stages of emotional responses. One thing to keep in mind is that each one of us will be at various stages and whatever satge we are at is where we are suppose to be. Knowing this helps family members to accept each other for being where they are and helps us to not feel so frustrated when others are at a different place then us. It is a normal part of the process and we each have our own pace of working through it. No stage is right or wrong, it just is.

The most healing place for most family members is when they meet a group of others who are all going through a similar thing. This is why I suggested the support group. It is very beneficial. It is there that you will also find out "how" to help your daughter. It depends on the resources in your local community. The family education course described below will also have some of the "how to help" strategies. Her husband can inform the family doctor about what is happening and ask him/her for help.

NAMI has an education course called Family-to-Family and this is something that all of your family members can attend and will be one of the best things you can do for yourself and your loved one. Again, you do not need a diagnosis in your loved one to attend the course and it is free. You will really like this course.

You will get through this.

:grouphug:
 

HA

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
1,516
Points
36
Dodger,

Sorry to hear this was a rough day. You can only do so much and as you go along it is very important to take care of yourselves and take breaks. It runs against our natural desire to "do something" until the problem is solved but it can take some time as you know, so you really need to take time out and regroup. Do whatever it is that helps you relax.

Taking care of yourselves is an important part of coping with this. If you don't take care of you then you won't be in any shape to help anyone. Taking care of yourself keeps you from burning out. If you are feeling really overwhelmed then that is the time to take a break and do something that takes your mind off of the situation.

It's not easy.

:grouphug:
 

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
I understand but some things happened Sunday that had to be dealt with. In a nutshell..my son in law decided to confton the S.O.B. that is part of tyhe destruction of his family...I tried to talk himout of it but he said he was going to tell him face to face about what damage he was doing. LONG story but the jerk called the police..I happened to be "lurking" in the neighborhood i because I was really concerned.Anyway the policemen were very understanding....when I came upon the scene...and didn't arrest him.(I tried to warn him about his job etc etc..he is a regional manager for a national company.
BUT i'm afraid he is at the breaking point.
We are so darn worried..................we are planning a family meeting ..we MUST do something!!
We are afraid...for a lot of reasons.
Thank you all......I am glad my search found this site.
Dodger
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
38,077
Points
113
Dodger, try to help your son-in-law see this much: There are two young girls incolved, his daughters, your grandchildren. The way things are going, he may not be able to salvage his marriage and he may not even want to. But he does have to think of the girls. He probably has a very good chance of getting full custody of them at present, but if he winds up with any record of violence he will throw that out the window. If that happens, the girls will be left without a father or a mother.

If you can try to get his focus shifted to the fact that his daughters need him to be stable and strong right now, that may help all of you.
 

Dodger

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
21
Points
1
Thank you Doctor.... we have tried to highlight that aspect and I know that he understands but I believe he has been hurt so much that he is at the breaking point. He is out of town on business for the next three days but we are concerned about when he returns. My wife is going to try AGAIN to talk to our daughter. Its like she just won't take any "ownership" of this mess, which she has set in motion by her actions.My wife asked her last night :how did things get to this point:...to which she answered "I don't know".
Well how can she NOT know............what got him really upset yesterday was this: my wife picked up the children to take them to church with her, upon which, he tells me, SHE left home and went to the home of this jerk she has taken up with. Her vehicle was in plain view which really upset my son in law ( its almost like she goes out of her way to "rub his nose in it". Anyway..he went to the pub for breakfast and liquid refreshment (whcih she should not have done) but i cannot say i don't understand. I don't drink but i DO anger when pushed and pushed and pushed.
When I found out he was planning to go see this clown at about 6 p.m. I tracked him (son in law) and tried my best to talk him out of it. He was walkking to the jerk's house...I tried to get him to get into my vehicle but he wouldn't do it. So all I could do was sort of "lurk"....being afraid of what he might do, altough he assured me he just wanted to "talk" to the jerk. But I was afraid that something would "set him off". He got the clown to come eout of his house.......my son in law asked him what his intentions are etc etc..the guy said he was going to call the police and did. I am so afraid of violence.... and i can understand that a man can only be pushed so far. THis has gone on for some time. My wife (her mother) is going to try and talk to her again.......................................
If anyone on this site believes in the power of prayer (as well as medication) we could use some of both I think.
I apologize for going on at such great length but i/we are at wit's end.
We will continue to try (he knows he can't use his job (and means of support for those two children) but I can also understand how he must feel.
Dodger
 

Halo

Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2005
Messages
7,475
Points
36
Dodger,

My thoughts and prayers are with you and your wife at this most difficult time

:hug:
 

HA

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
1,516
Points
36
My thoughts and prayers are with you too, Dodger.

Using an anti-anxiety or anti-depression medication for yourselves is one tool to consider for self care. I have used both when needed.

No need to apologize for telling us what you are going through. Let us know how things are going.
 
Last edited:

ThatLady

Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
4,104
Points
36
Dodger, have you and your wife sought counselling to help YOU deal with this situation. As David pointed out, your daughter is an adult. While I, as the mother of adult children, do understand your concern and distress, I also know there's little we, as parents, can do when we see our adult children making what we consider to be bad decisions. We can offer guidance, but if our guidance is not accepted, our hands are sadly tied.

The next best thing, in my opinion, is to get counselling for yourselves. This will help you to cope with the feelings you're having and to find ways to carry on with your own lives. It doesn't mean you don't care about your daughter; however, if you don't take care of you then, if and when your daughter realizes her mistakes, you won't be in a position to be of help to her. You need to ensure that you're ready for that time to come. :hug:
 

Latest posts


Top Bottom