• Quote of the Day
    "It is only too easy to compel a sensitive human being to feel guilty about anything."
    Morton Irving Seiden, posted by Daniel

desiderata

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I looked up the condition where a person feels they are chronically running out of time. I forgot the condition and fall into the category. On a daily basis with daily activities and a lifetime basis judging where I should or shouldn't be at in a point in my life. It's a cruel affliction because the time and energy taken thinking of time lost takes away from the present time. I suppose this could be categorized in a more generalized form of anxiety. And there are ways to combat this. Unfortunately, I don't take the time to look into.
 

Daniel

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There are also cultural/social factors, e.g.

American Mania: When More is Not Enough


On the more psychological/individual side, there is mindfulness and novelty:


Time always slows down for me when I do pushups :)
 
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Daniel

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Giving Time Can Give You Time
Association for Psychological Science
July 12, 2012

Many people these days feel a sense of “time famine”—never having enough minutes and hours to do everything. We all know that our objective amount of time can’t be increased (there are only 24 hours in a day), but a new study suggests that volunteering our limited time—giving it away— may actually increase our sense of unhurried leisure.

Across four different experiments, researchers found that people’s subjective sense of having time, called ‘time affluence,’ can be increased: compared with wasting time, spending time on oneself, and even gaining a windfall of ‘free’ time, spending time on others increased participants’ feelings of time affluence.

Lead researcher and psychological scientist Cassie Mogilner of The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania believes this is because giving away time boosts one’s sense of personal competence and efficiency, and this in turn stretches out time in our minds. Ultimately, giving time makes people more willing to commit to future engagements despite their busy schedules.

This new research, conducted by Mogilner and co-authors Zoe Chance of the Yale School of Management and Michael Norton of Harvard Business School, is forthcoming in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
 
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Daniel

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Time Smart

There's an 80 percent chance you're poor. Time poor, that is.

Four out of five adults report feeling that they have too much to do and not enough time to do it. These time-poor people experience less joy each day. They laugh less. They are less healthy, less productive, and more likely to divorce. In one study, time stress produced a stronger negative effect on happiness than unemployment.

How can we escape the time traps that make us feel this way and keep us from living our best lives?

Time Smart is your playbook for taking back the time you lose to mindless tasks and unfulfilling chores. Author and Harvard Business School professor Ashley Whillans will give you proven strategies for improving your "time affluence." The techniques Whillans provides will free up seconds, minutes, and hours that, over the long term, become weeks and months that you can reinvest in positive, healthy activities.

Time Smart doesn't stop at telling you what to do. It also shows you how to do it, helping you achieve the mindset shift that will make these activities part of your everyday regimen through assessments, checklists, and activities you can use right away. The strategies Whillans presents will help you make the shift to time-smart living and, in the process, build a happier, more fulfilling life.

"Time affluence involves small decisions that allow you to have more and better time, such as saying no more often and paying your way out of time-consuming, unrewarding tasks."
 
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Daniel

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From Zimbardo's time/book website:
The Time Paradox is not a single paradox but a series of paradoxes that shape our lives and our destinies. For example:

Paradox 1
Time is one of the most powerful influences on our thoughts, feelings, and actions, yet we are usually totally unaware of the effect of time in our lives.

Paradox 2
Each specific attitude toward time—or time perspective—is associated with numerous benefits, yet in excess each is associated with even greater costs.

Paradox 3
Individual attitudes toward time are learned through personal experience, yet collectively attitudes toward time influence national destinies.

(At the risk of being extreme, any perspective about anything has downsides. That's why zen is still so popular.)
 
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Daniel

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. It's a cruel affliction because the time and energy taken thinking of time lost takes away from the present time.
That aspect reminds me of my OCD.

But I love solution-focused questions, like:

"When does your perfect future happen, even a little bit?" "How did you make that happen?"

"Tell me about a time when anxiety wasn’t a problem."
 
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desiderata

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There are moments in our lives but they are fleeting when the three aspects of time converge. The past is not filled with regret, the present is smooth, and the future looks bright. To capture the sensation would be amazing but not possible at this juncture. The reality is we are still bound by time and until we can perceive it relatively we will live within the three dimensions of it. It will take an evolvement of hundreds and thousands of years to achieve. The best we can do now is the changing of the mindset to start the way. I sound as if I know what I'm talking about and I do in my mind, taking time to write this post.
Taking time- what an interesting message!
 

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