More threads by Peanut

Peanut

Member
Hi, I was wondering if I could get other people's advice or opinions. A great opportunity just randomly presented itself where a good friend offered me a beautiful condo at a good price for the place. A friend and myself could move into together and it would probably be an amazingly fun experience (especially considering this is both of our last year in school,etc). However, to do this I could probably not afford to buy my *second* insurance policy that helps cover the cost of this psychologist that I see who I really like (he's not covered by my primary policy, managed care, blah blah blah). I have been seeing him for somewhere between 1.5-2 yrs and I hate to lose him, but at the same time I don't know if I should put my life on hold so I can keep spending enormous amounts of money on him. I feel like I could still use his help, but I'm not sure I'll ever feel like I'm "done" with his help. I see him once a week and he's never mentioned stopping. I do have a savings account I could use. I have a job but don't have time to work full time during the school year. Does anyone have any opinion about this? Should I move into this beautiful condo with my friend or stay in therapy or use my savings to continue to have two insurance policies, or pay the high rate privately? Or should I cut my losses and figure therapy is over (which would be sad for me)?

Any opinions are greatly appreciated! Thanks!
 

ThatLady

Member
Maybe there's a compromise in here somewhere, Arose. Perhaps, you could take advantage of the opportunity presented you to live in the condo for your last year in school, and see your therapist less often - say, every other week, every third week, monthly - whatever you and the therapist could work out.
I really think this is something worth talking to the therapist about directly. He can probably help you make the right decision. :)
 

Peanut

Member
Thank you thatlady. I really appreciate your ideas. I like them. I think that might be a good solution. Thank you very much.
 

Peanut

Member
Well I talked with the psychologist about it and it didn't seem like he thought I should move right now. He insinuated the timing wasn't good and that also I appeared to be doing worse than I had been in a long time. Then he offered me water, cheese (randomly), thought I needed to eat. It was not good. I didn't get a chance to broach how it would affect me seeing him, but I think he doesn't think it's a good idea. I'm not sure what was going on because I felt fine. Regardless, now I'm getting more anxious about the move. Hopefully it will work out alright. I think I will still take your suggestion Thatlady. Thanks. OK, I just had to get a few pieces of this weird session of my mind.
 

Banned

Banned
Member
Hi Arose,

I was going to suggest exactly what TL did - but darn it - she beat me to it! Anyway, I too would see if you can either go less often, or is there room for a third person in your condo to help keep the expenses down? Would your therapist be willing to adjust his fee to help you out if he thinks it's premature? Definitely look at your options...this sounds very workable.
 

ThatLady

Member
I'm really pleased if I could be of help, Arose. Hopefully, you'll be able to work something out that will be acceptable to everyone, and allow you to proceed with your life in a way that's right for you! :hug:
 

Peanut

Member
Thank you both very much! I really appreciate your advice and input. This has turned out to be a tremendous source of anxiety for me and it's nice to be able to get some help with it. Thanks for both of your reassurance, it was sorely needed! :)
 

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