• Quote of the Day
    "Plant your own garden and decorate your own soul, instead of waiting for someone to bring you flowers."
    Veronica A. Shoffstall, After a While (1971), posted by David Baxter

Retired

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
8,965
Points
36
Ten Things You Need To Know To Overcome OCD
By Fred Penzel, Ph.D

Because of the length of this excellent and insightful article into some of the realities of OCD, the entire article is attached as a :acrobat: file for download / viewing / printing.

Here is an excerpt:

Some of these points may seem obvious, but it has always struck me as remarkable how little of this information my new patients, who are otherwise intelligent and informed people, are seen to possess coming into therapy.

You may not like some of the things on this list, as they may not be what you wish to hear. You don't have to like them. However, if you wish to change, you will need to accept them. The concepts of change and acceptance go hand-in-hand, and define each other. There are some things you will be able to change, and some you will have to accept. It is important to discriminate between the two, so as to not end up misdirecting your efforts.

1. OCD is chronic.

2. Two of OCD's main features are doubt and guilt.

3. Although you can resist performing a compulsion, you cannot refuse to think an obsessive thought.

4. Cognitive/Behavioral Therapy is the best form of treatment for OCD.

5. While medication is a help, it is not a complete treatment in itself.

6. You cannot and should not depend upon the help of others to manage your anxiety or to get well.

7. The goal of any good treatment is to teach you to become your own therapist.

8. You cannot rely upon your own intuition in deciding how to deal with OCD.

9. Getting recovered takes time.

10. Relapse is a potential risk that must be guarded against.

Each point is elaborated on in the complete attached article

Also attached is an overview article titled "The Different Types of OCD" from OCD-UK.org
 

Attachments

  • Ten Things You Need To Know To Overcome OCD Beyond OCD _ Resources to get there.pdf
    230.7 KB · Views: 6
  • The Different Types of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder _ OCD-UK.pdf
    238.9 KB · Views: 5

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113
Intense Fear Of Guilt May Be At The Heart Of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder | HuffPost

...Cognitive behavioral therapy is currently the most effective treatment for OCD. Melli suggests that therapists with patients who may have high guilt sensitivity should help them focus on strategies for challenging their feelings of excessive responsibility to others and cultivating a greater acceptance of guilt.

“When checking rituals are primarily involved,” he said, “cognitive behavioral therapists should target also beliefs concerning the intolerability and dangerousness of experiencing guilt.”
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113
Real Event OCD

...OCD sufferers engage in cognitive distortions, where the human mind frames life situations in irrational and exaggerated ways. ‘All or nothing thinking’ is a form of perfectionism where a person views situations in two extremes rather than on a continuum. The problem with this form of thinking is that you must be perfect or you are unacceptable. Even a small mistake puts you in a ‘bad’ category with killers, rapists and pedophiles. Without recognition of the ‘all or nothing’ distortion, an OCD sufferer will engage in mental and physical compulsions to ensure they are a good person and experience an urgent need to disprove they are bad...
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113

With good or fair insight: The individual recognizes that obsessive-compulsive beliefs are definitely or probably not true or that they may or may not be true.

With poor insight: The individual thinks obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are probably true.

With absent insight/delusional beliefs: The individual is completely convinced that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are true.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113

Insight also pertains to how a person views OCD in their day-to-day life. Someone with OCD may recognize the irrationality of their obsessions and compulsions but fail to understand or acknowledge that OCD has affected their ability to function...

While there is some disagreement, poor or absent insight into OCD symptoms is thought to predict a worse response to psychological and medical treatments.

Poor or absent insight can make it harder for someone with OCD to feel motivated, do the hard work that therapy requires, or stick to taking medication (especially if there are unpleasant side effects).

People with poor insight may also be less likely to attend regular appointments or contact a healthcare provider at all...

Insight into OCD symptoms and the effect they have on functioning can also change after treatment with psychotherapy or medication. However, these changes usually occur slowly and can also fluctuate over time.
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113

I wish this was a rare phenomenon; however, over the years, I have met many people who felt that their OCD, depression, etc. was so different or so much more severe than anyone else, that they felt treatment was not going to work for them - spending time and energy trying to convince others around them (myself included) that their condition was unique beyond help…If they were to funnel that same time and energy into treatment itself, very often, success and progress can be the result.

Not only is someone who deems themselves terminally unique less likely to seek treatment or actively engage in it even if they are actually in treatment, but they are also less likely to seek the support of those around them (family, friends, etc.), including others with the same condition, because even people with the same diagnosis “are nothing like me”...

You are NOT so different that no one could possibly understand the pain and difficulties that you live with; you might have a relatively unique set of life circumstances, but your issues are more common than you could imagine.
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,988
Points
113

Untreated OCD is often regarded as one of the most vexing and frustrating of the major anxiety disorders because sufferers are consciously aware of their irrationality but powerless to push it away. Most OCD sufferers will hide their behaviors from others to avoid negative attention because they understand the abnormal nature of their compulsions. This, combined with the fact that the compulsions in some sufferers are entirely mental, has earned the disease the moniker "the secret illness."
 

Latest posts


Top Bottom