• Quote of the Day
    "The hardest battle you're ever going to fight is the battle to be just you."
    Leo F. Buscaglia, posted by Daniel

CeeBee2230

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Greetings,

I'm not sure that this is the right venue for my 26 year interest in the 'Cause of ADHD'. I am a retired Youth Counselor with experience working with 13-17 year old Boy's in a State Incarceration Facility. I believe that 25% of these Boy's would fit the DSM-V criteria for ADHD. I believe that 'Risky Behavior' may be the Common Denominator. Comments, Thoughts or Suggestions Appreciated.

CeeBee2230
 

David Baxter

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I worked years (decades) ago in correctional facilities as well and I would agree that the incidence of ADHD and other impulse control disorders is higher in that population than in the general population.

On the other hand, I saw a lot of offenders with addictions that began when they were misdiagnosed as children and medicated with stimulants to try to make them more compliant in the classroom or at home.

Somewhere around DSM IV (or possibly DSM III-R) the diagnostic criteria for ADHD was changed. Previously, one of the criteria for the diagnosis of ADHD was that "other causes for the impulsive behavior or distractibility be ruled out". Once this requirement was removed, the number of ADHD diagnoses in young people increased significantly and eventually some of those misdiagnoses found there way into rehab and correctional populations.

There are several conditions that can be related to distractibility and impulsivity, including head injuries and learning disabilities of various types, which were also over-represented in correctional populations.
 

Daniel

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Side notes:


 

CeeBee2230

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I worked years (decades) ago in correctional facilities as well and I would agree that the incidence of ADHD and other impulse control disorders is higher in that population than in the general population.

On the other hand, I saw a lot of offenders with addictions that began when they were misdiagnosed as children and medicated with stimulants to try to make them more compliant in the classroom or at home.

Somewhere around DSM IV (or possibly DSM III-R) the diagnostic criteria for ADHD was changed. Previously, one of the criteria for the diagnosis of ADHD was that "other causes for the impulsive behavior or distractibility be ruled out". Once this requirement was removed, the number of ADHD diagnoses in young people increased significantly and eventually some of those misdiagnoses found there way into rehab and correctional populations.

There are several conditions that can be related to distractibility and impulsivity, including head injuries and learning disabilities of various types, which were also over-represented in correctional populations.
Thanks for your comments David.

I believe that 'We Humans do and say things (Behave) because we receive some benefit from that behavior, either consciously or unconsciously'. So, what does a 13 year old Boy get out of pulling the 'Fire Alarm' at school? Any ideas?

CeeBee2230
 

David Baxter

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Hard to say as a general question.

Attention? A break from lessons/boredom?
 

CeeBee2230

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Taking risks can give them a little rush of that dopamine that they are missing.


Taking risks can give them a little rush of that dopamine that they are missing.
And I agree 100% Daniel.....Let's turn the clock back 119 years to March 6th, 1902 and the second Goulstonian Lecture by Dr. George F. Still at the Royal College of Physicians (London).
Dr. Still mentioned a young Boy in his Study of 20 Children
(15 Boys and 5 Girls). The Boy was from a prominent and wealthy Family and had a "generous allowance". The Boy would steal items from his classmates, and later that day, he would take those items to Town and give them to other Kids.
Dr. Still refers to this as very odd behavior that the Boy would steal items from others, but really did not want the items he had stolen. Dr. Still stated, "in this thieving, for instance, there is sometimes a handsome generosity".

We cant blame Dr. Still for missing the neurotransmitter thing
because little was known about neurotransmitters, emotions,
homeostasis and allostatic load back in 1902.

I've attached a study by Joseph M. Carver, Ph.D. about
Chemical Imbalance
 

CeeBee2230

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Hard to say as a general question.

Attention? A break from lessons/boredom?
t
Hard to say as a general question.

Attention? A break from lessons/boredom?
I ran across the attached Article: Why Do Stimulants Work for Treatment of ADHD? I agree with paragraphs 1 and 2, but my research leads me in a new direction after that. Please read both pages.
 

CeeBee2230

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You forgot to add the attachment.

Is this the article you meant?

Yes David....Click on the hyperlink: Why Do Stimulants Work for Treatment of ADHD? A Partial Paragraph will come up. Click on the box ......Read More. The first paragraph....Most Parents...and ending...about this paradox. The second paragraph ....Kids with ADHD....and ending....need to self stimulate. David, these 2 paragraphs are the basis for understanding 'The Cause of ADHD.
 

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