• Quote of the Day
    "For most people, transformation is slow. It happens without you realizing it."
    Marsha Linehan, posted by Daniel

David Baxter

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Are you talking about repressed memories, 2scoops? or feelings/emotions you have that you find difficult to express to others?
 

2scoops

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The reason I ask is because I have read John E Sarno's books and he believes repressed emotions in the unconscious mind cuases physical symptoms. So I am having trouble dipping into what might be going on, meaning finding out the repressed emotions. He believes repressed anger is the biggest contributor. So, I am contemplating pyschotherapy, but would like to see if someone can help me out first.
 

Daniel

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With chronic back pain, for instance, the emotional aspect is usually just one part of the problem. Some people may need a personal trainer while others may need a therapist.

Of course, therapy can help one better cope with chronic pain regardless of the etiology.
 

2scoops

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I am using Sarno's research for back pain, nerve pain, and acid reflux. I know his methods work and I know he has 30 years to back that up, I don't doubt that one bit. Plus I've been down just about every known avenue that treats physical problems. I wanted some help, some ideas on how to find some of those repressed emotions. I am thinking of pyschotherapy, because that what Sarno advises. Just don't know any around here in Ohio.
 

Daniel

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There are therapists that specialize in chronic pain management. The most effective method is still CBT (cognitive-behavioral therapy).
 

2scoops

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I have a book called Three Minute Therapy. I cannot remember if that is CBT. Cannot remmeber the author right now either. I started reading it, and have not finished it yet.
 

Daniel

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Of course, doing self-help really doesn't compare to the effectiveness of seeing a therpist. Most therpists incorporate CBT.

This is just a guess, but one way to find a good therapist for this issue may be by contacting reputable pain management clinics:

One recently publicized approach, developed by Dr. John Sarno, a professor of clinical rehabilitation medicine at New York University School of Medicine and attending physician at the Howard A. Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, proposes a connection between back pain and repressed anger. According to Dr. Sarno, the anger causes the brain to reduce the blood supply to back tissues, resulting in pain. Treatment is based on education. Patients attend a series of sessions that focus on the anger hypothesis. Though the mechanisms by which anger may cause back pain are unknown and highly speculative, many people—including celebrities like radio personality Howard Stern and consumer reporter John Stossel—say they've been helped by Dr. Sarno's techniques.

"While such an approach may help, it's unlikely that any one psychological issue is relevant to all individuals with back pain or any other medical problem," Dr. Rabins says. Our recommendation: Look for a program offered by a multidisciplinary pain center or clinic that offers a variety of diagnostic and treatment services. Such facilities are sometimes accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (520-325-1044). While not required, accreditation offers some measure of assurance that the program is comprehensive.

http://www.hopkinsafter50.com/html/silos/backpain/boLIB_HA50_easing.php

I would think that most of the larger hospitals have a pain management center with therapists on staff.
 

Suzette

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As I see it one does not have a body, one IS a body (hope I translated that well from my own language).

Your body talks and I have great admiration for those people who dare to listen. For me that is the healthiest way and the most effective.
 

comfortzone

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Biofeedback is another alternative that might be used to manage pain.

I prefer to call feelings such as you described "unexpressed" feelings/emotions. E-motions are intended to "move through" the body and when let's say someone "stuffs" or "swallows" their emotions...I believe that these unexpressed feelings "remain" in the body. One of my clients is working through some of these issues and she has been able to work through some of her painful symptoms. However, I explain how she needs to follow through with her medical doctor regularly as well as to make all of her therapy appointments. To you use Suzette's phrase...my client is learning to listen to her body which is something she never learned in her past. She is finding out how it is to feel.
 

2scoops

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I agree with you comfortzone. I never expressed my feelings growing up. It's probably because my parents did not with their parents. I am currently reading The Journey by Brandon Hays, I started reading it and I love that book. She believes those repressed emotions can stay in the body and cause health problems. Actually, she healed a basketball size tumor in her body. She pretty much dropped traditional medicine, and did her own thing. I am at that point in my life. Doctors are almost like mechanics of the body. They cut, they prescribe, they treat symptoms. I want the cause. I also read Candance Pert's Molecules Of Emotions, she believes in the mindbody. Got some books by Norman Cousins, and look forward to reading Deepak Chopra. But I know we must be active in our healing. We are more than just a mind, we have a soul, and we have emotions. That's two aspects most traditional docotrs overlook.
 

Daniel

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Some of these mind-body authors (just some) may go too far, abandoming medicine a little too much rather than incorporating medicine and psychology in a multidisciplinary approach that may also include exercise, nutrition, etc.

Many therapists and psychiatrists, for example, may be guilty of a similar bias by not recommending exercise to their patients since exercise can help with depression, anxiety, etc.
 

David Baxter

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I would agree with you, Daniel. I think the best therapists tend to take a wholistic approach to psychotherapy -- medication, psychotherapy, lifestyle, medical/physical health, nutrition -- everything interacts in the end and each of these factors makes an important contribution both to illness and to health/recovery.
 

2scoops

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David Baxter said:
I would agree with you, Daniel. I think the best therapists tend to take a wholistic approach to psychotherapy -- medication, psychotherapy, lifestyle, medical/physical health, nutrition -- everything interacts in the end and each of these factors makes an important contribution both to illness and to health/recovery.

I agree with you, except I feel a strong caution needs to be used with medications. I think too many docotrs are too quick to prescribe medications. Rather than finding the true cause, imho. Plus these medications can have side effects, then before you know it, your on another med to treat a symptom from a med you are currently taking. I'm not saying the mindbody is all you look at, but evey doctor I have ever been to, has never even mentioned. Plus, I am a christian and my soul is something that I believe plays a part in my health. I know I need to start making changes, especially with my diet. But that what this is all about, a change for the better.
 

David Baxter

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I agree with you, except I feel a strong caution needs to be used with medications. I think too many doctors are too quick to prescribe medications. Rather than finding the true cause, imho.
The issue isn't usually with medications but with expecting medications to do everything... in many, perhaps most cases, medication is an important part of therapy.
 

comfortzone

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I agree with David. I know an excellent psychiatrist who does his best to keep the doses at a therapeutic level without over medicated. He was fabulous to work in conjunction with.
 

Daniel

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More on the mind/body link in back pain:

The pain is usually caused by many different factors working together at once, experts agree. Often, a physical factor, such as lifting or sitting for too long, combines with stress, and the result is a painful back. Where they don't agree, however, is about the degree to which psychological stress on its own can cause back pain.

"Stress can surface anywhere a person has a weak link, whether it be back pain, neck pain, headaches, or whatever," says Rick Delamarter, MD, medical director of the Spine Institute at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica and associate clinical professor of orthopaedic surgery at the University of California at Los Angeles. "If a person has a propensity for back or neck problems, stress can easily bring them to the surface or exacerbate them."

For severe stress, you may need professional guidance. Both pain management experts and mental health professionals, such as psychologists or psychiatrists, can help.

Regular exercise is very important for maintaining back health not only because it keeps your muscles strong and your back well supported, but also because it's a great stress buster.

Is Your Job a Pain in the Back? - WebMD
 

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