More threads by Pilonea

Pilonea

Member
How much difference a year can make,
If only a few moments of callow indiscretion I could take,
Away from a passel of newly forged mistakes;

From the cobwebs of my mind I rake,
The passing and whispering comments that resonate,
My past and that of my longed for mate's,
Whom without a care or folly forged my fate,
With but a pernicious word of hate,
Forever sealed my understanding of love to a blackened crate;

So the ruminations of my mind do grate
On the rocky concept of harmony it can't situate
For the derision of love it shall forever state
Beneath the weight,
Of the anvil of contempt it shall continue to partake.



A sonnet of doggerel is often an apposite and succinct method of conveying hard to describe emotions. Please excuse my contrived ten minutes of poetic apotheosis, but sometimes it is tempting and I just cannot refuse.

It is I, Pilonea, here to grace the presence of this excellently conceived and rather handy board, for those of no other avenues of expression. For my first post to this board dealing with my life that I made one year ago, click this URL: http://www.psychlinks.ca/phpbb/viewtopic.php?t=1492

Yeah, I have graduated from being twenty-six years of age to the ripe old age of twenty-seven. Not much has changed, only the names of those with whom I work, converse and of my ISP.

I have went from being unemployed last year at this time, to having moved to another state, been evicted from my household before I could begin a rather high paying sales job (I was selected amongst hundreds of candidates), and then returning to the laps of poverty where I currently reside -- again unemployed. Yes, I have been employed since I returned from the other state, but only in a minimum wage environment of capitalistic inebriation; you know, where the little guy gets squashed under the heel of the big capitalist in a three-piece tuxedo.

I have no relationship with the female species, at least not currently, nor in the past year. My moods fluctuate to a rather depressed state (though usually mixed with irritation, garrulousness, and some energy -- shrinks call it a "mixed state"), and I get little done in a lot of time.

My sleep patterns are all over the place, ranging from the 2nd shift one week to graveyard the next, then back to the dreaded 1st shift.

I am on 20 mg of Prozac per day, when I can remember to take it, and have not seen my Doc in months (I missed my last appointment). I feel as though I have outgrown psychiatry and the rudimentary bits of psychotherapy I have experienced. It is time to turn the wheels onto new avenues of knowledge and healing; psychology cannot heal what it cannot understand nor diagnose. Individuals are so wide-ranging in environmental backgrounds, neurotransmitter synaptic functioning and a whole host of other areas I am not able to fully understand, that any one diagnosis pulled from the shiny wrappings of the DSM manual seem quaint and hardly worthy of further consideration.

Ahh, I suppose I shall continue on my path of capricious work patterns, minimum wage jobs and loneliness. I don't remember signing my John Hancock to this script when I was moved from the maternity ward after birth.
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
I feel as though I have outgrown psychiatry and the rudimentary bits of psychotherapy I have experienced. It is time to turn the wheels onto new avenues of knowledge and healing; psychology cannot heal what it cannot understand nor diagnose. Individuals are so wide-ranging in environmental backgrounds, neurotransmitter synaptic functioning and a whole host of other areas I am not able to fully understand, that any one diagnosis pulled from the shiny wrappings of the DSM manual seem quaint and hardly worthy of further consideration.
What is it about you that you feel psychology cannot understand?
 

Pilonea

Member
What is it about you that you feel psychology cannot understand?

Oh my disdain for human interaction beyond the most necessary and beyond my closest friends, which number about three. I do not rank even my own family very highly on my "to do list" this Holliday season. Furthermore, if my diagnosis of Bipolar disorder is correct, I find my "type" or "Axis" as you folk call it to be a rather odd one not easily researchable in the online data. (What exactly does "Axis" mean in psychspeak anyway?)

I can often fluctuate from euphoria to a feeling of depression within a matter of hours, and often minutes. I often feel both at once. I also feel as if I may have some minor symptoms of paranoid personality disorder since I often obsess over events in my past which were embarrassing and feel as if people still discuss these issues privately and are wanting to humiliate me once again. I am also paranoid in other more regular situations. My heart often races and I am typically a very anxious person. I also feel as if I may suffer from OCD because of certain "quirks" that I cannot control. Then in more normal frames of mind, which have been rare as of late, I scoff at my paranoia and realize everything might be OK. More later..
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
Other than when required, I don't usually bother with a formal DSM diagnosis - in therapy, I prefer to focus on problems, issues, and symptoms. I think you'll find that most psychologists work this way.

As for online information about bipolar disorder, in fact there is a great deal available: see Bipolar Disorder resources.
 

Similar threads

https://www.facs.org/for-medical-professionals/news-publications/news-and-articles/acs-brief/reviews/colonoscopy-vs-fit-fecal-dna/ For patients who do not have insurance and have no prospects of obtaining it, the cost of FIT-DNA testing is $500–$600 versus $2,750 for colonoscopy (national average), and $24 for FIT alone. Clearly, in this instance, FIT alone is most cost effective, with an additional acceptable cost of FIT-DNA with a higher sensitivity and a slightly better polyp detection...
Replies
1
Views
484
Mysterious note reunites April Wine frontman with stolen guitar 46 years later by Jon Tattrie, CBC News Jan 02, 2019 Myles Goodwyn played Gibson Melody Maker on hits like Bad Side of the Moon, You Could Have Been a Lady Myles Goodwyn has had a hard time taking his hands off the guitar since being reunited. (Robert Short/CBC) Fifty years ago, Myles Goodwyn was a broke musician with big dreams when he saw a Gibson Melody Maker gleaming in Inverness, N.S. He went inside and traded his...
Replies
0
Views
4K
Anaphylactic reaction in kids could recur hours later, study finds By Helen Branswell, CBC News June 21, 2015 A new study by Ontario researchers suggests about 15 per cent of children who have a severe allergic reaction that involves anaphylaxis can actually have a second reaction hours after the first. It warns that doctors and parents should be on the lookout for this type of two-stage or biphasic anaphylactic reaction. Some predictors of who might develop biphasic anaphylaxis...
Replies
0
Views
3K
Midlife Migraine Linked to Later Parkinson's Medscape Medical News September 17, 2014 Patients with midlife migraine, particularly migraine with aura, are more likely than those without headache to report parkinsonian symptoms and to be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) later in life, a new study suggests. Further, women with migraine were more likely to have a parent or sibling with PD, and headache was also associated with restless legs syndrome, another movement disorder. "Our...
Replies
0
Views
4K
Why Do Anxiety and High Blood Pressure Go Hand-In-Hand? -- Psychology Today Non-drug treatments for high blood pressure tend to be the same treatments that lower anxiety. The following list of treatments may both lower blood pressure and reduce anxiety: Yoga: There is now a significant amount of research on yoga as a possible treatment for anxiety. Research also indicates that yoga may help treat hypertension if it incorporates three particular elements: poses, meditation, and breath...
Replies
1
Views
4K
Top