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dor

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Aug 15, 2005
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I'm new to this forum and was impressed by all the information supplied by the administrator of this site. When registering I stated I was treated for depression for years and then diagnosed with bp. I must correct this. I have been in treatment with a psychiatrist for 10 years.

My psyche has not provided me with a diagnosis but has done well adjusting my medication and providing appropriate therapy to help control my fluctuating moods.

My doctor seems to avoid the issue of discussing diagnosis and it makes me wonder if she really knows my diagnosis.

Lactimal and resperdal have been prescribed with good results. I did some reseach and thought these meds were related for bp treatment.

Is diagnosis neccessay or even all that important for a patient to know??

I'm going to address this issue with her at my next follow up and let you know the outcome.
 

dor

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
23
Points
1
I'm new to this forum and was impressed by all the information supplied by the administrator of this site. When registering I stated I was treated for depression for years and then diagnosed with bp. I must correct this. I have been in treatment with a psychiatrist for 10 years.

My psyche has not provided me with a diagnosis but has done well adjusting my medication and providing appropriate therapy to help control my fluctuating moods.

My doctor seems to avoid the issue of discussing diagnosis and it makes me wonder if she really knows my diagnosis.

Lactimal and resperdal have been prescribed with good results. I did some reseach and thought these meds were related for bp treatment.

Is diagnosis neccessay or even all that important for a patient to know??

I'm going to address this issue with her at my next follow up and let you know the outcome.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,968
Points
113
There are a number of medications that were originally developed for one purpose and yet are commonly used to treat other conditions than the original. One example is SSRI antidepressants, which are now also used to treat anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, self-injury, and even attention deficit disorder. Another is clonazepam (and similar medications), originally developed to treat eplilepsy but now commonly used for treatment of anxiety and sleep disorders. The atypical antipsychotics have been found to be helpful in treating depression and anxiety disorders. Mood stabilizers such as lamictal (lamotrigine, which was also originally developed to treat something else, epilepsy if I'm not mistaken) may be used for recurrent depression or other mood disorders.

Thus, it may be true that the medications you are taking are most commonly used to treat bipolar disorder but the fact that you are prescribed those does not necessarily indicate in itself that that is the diagnosis you have been given. I think these days physicians will use what works, based on the symptoms you are exhibiting, without worrying too much about why the drug was originally marketed.

Could your diagnosis be bipolar disorder? Sure. You might want to ask your doctor about that, as you suggest. Is it necessary or even all that important for you to know the diagnosis? That's difficult to answer -- I think it's important for some of my clients and not important or possibly even detrimental for others.
 

David Baxter

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Messages
37,968
Points
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There are a number of medications that were originally developed for one purpose and yet are commonly used to treat other conditions than the original. One example is SSRI antidepressants, which are now also used to treat anxiety disorders, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, self-injury, and even attention deficit disorder. Another is clonazepam (and similar medications), originally developed to treat eplilepsy but now commonly used for treatment of anxiety and sleep disorders. The atypical antipsychotics have been found to be helpful in treating depression and anxiety disorders. Mood stabilizers such as lamictal (lamotrigine, which was also originally developed to treat something else, epilepsy if I'm not mistaken) may be used for recurrent depression or other mood disorders.

Thus, it may be true that the medications you are taking are most commonly used to treat bipolar disorder but the fact that you are prescribed those does not necessarily indicate in itself that that is the diagnosis you have been given. I think these days physicians will use what works, based on the symptoms you are exhibiting, without worrying too much about why the drug was originally marketed.

Could your diagnosis be bipolar disorder? Sure. You might want to ask your doctor about that, as you suggest. Is it necessary or even all that important for you to know the diagnosis? That's difficult to answer -- I think it's important for some of my clients and not important or possibly even detrimental for others.
 

dor

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
23
Points
1
I saw my psychiatrist today and we discussed my diagnosis. She stated that since I had previous history of depression, paranoid delusions and depression she felt I have a personality disorder.

Very general I might add. She also mentioned a schizo-affective personality and went into Axises. I'm not that familiar with all she mentioned and honestly I don't care as long as I am feeling well.

I wouldn't say I'm 100% but I have found out over the years I function very well with medication management.

I still find I worry more than I should. I recently (today as a matter of fact) secured a job I have been waiting for, for a long time. Wish me luck.
 

dor

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Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
23
Points
1
I saw my psychiatrist today and we discussed my diagnosis. She stated that since I had previous history of depression, paranoid delusions and depression she felt I have a personality disorder.

Very general I might add. She also mentioned a schizo-affective personality and went into Axises. I'm not that familiar with all she mentioned and honestly I don't care as long as I am feeling well.

I wouldn't say I'm 100% but I have found out over the years I function very well with medication management.

I still find I worry more than I should. I recently (today as a matter of fact) secured a job I have been waiting for, for a long time. Wish me luck.
 

David Baxter

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Probably schizoaffective disorder -- a mixture of mood disorder with some delusional thinking or possibly hallucinations.

Do you have a history of drug abuse?
 

David Baxter

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Probably schizoaffective disorder -- a mixture of mood disorder with some delusional thinking or possibly hallucinations.

Do you have a history of drug abuse?
 

ThatLady

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Good luck with the new job, hon. :eek:)

If you really want a name for your symptoms, you can ask your therapist. She/he may decide it would benefit you to know, or they may decide it won't. For me, it wouldn't matter. As long as my symptoms are controlled, and I'm feeling well and getting along in life without undue difficulties, you can call me Sam, or you can call me Fred. ;-)
 

ThatLady

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Good luck with the new job, hon. :eek:)

If you really want a name for your symptoms, you can ask your therapist. She/he may decide it would benefit you to know, or they may decide it won't. For me, it wouldn't matter. As long as my symptoms are controlled, and I'm feeling well and getting along in life without undue difficulties, you can call me Sam, or you can call me Fred. ;-)
 

dor

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Thanks for all your replies.

With regard to a history of drug abuse the answer is yes. I smoked pot for about thirty years!! I finally gave it up. I often wonder if the pot exaccerbated my condition. I never had a history of psyche disorders until about 10 years ago.

Does pot have long lasting affects?? I still experience some bouts of paranoia. Mostly thinking people are talking about me. Then when I speak to them or see them things seem fine.

I focus on thinking positive but there are times I become particularly depressed. I lost alot of friends over the past 2 years. I was needy and acting strangely and think I scared people away.

Sometimes it can get lonely. Thank goodness I have a wonderful family. A supportive husband and two wonderful children. But they all work long hours and have a busy life. I've been out of work a few months and cant wait to return.
 

dor

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
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Points
1
Thanks for all your replies.

With regard to a history of drug abuse the answer is yes. I smoked pot for about thirty years!! I finally gave it up. I often wonder if the pot exaccerbated my condition. I never had a history of psyche disorders until about 10 years ago.

Does pot have long lasting affects?? I still experience some bouts of paranoia. Mostly thinking people are talking about me. Then when I speak to them or see them things seem fine.

I focus on thinking positive but there are times I become particularly depressed. I lost alot of friends over the past 2 years. I was needy and acting strangely and think I scared people away.

Sometimes it can get lonely. Thank goodness I have a wonderful family. A supportive husband and two wonderful children. But they all work long hours and have a busy life. I've been out of work a few months and cant wait to return.
 

David Baxter

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Joined
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Messages
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Chronic pot use can certainly trigger paranoid thinking and anxiety issues, including panic attacks. And these adverse effects can continue for some time (up to a year) after discontinuing pot use, or is some cases the symptoms are not reversible without specific treatment.

How long ago did you quit?
 

David Baxter

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Chronic pot use can certainly trigger paranoid thinking and anxiety issues, including panic attacks. And these adverse effects can continue for some time (up to a year) after discontinuing pot use, or is some cases the symptoms are not reversible without specific treatment.

How long ago did you quit?
 

dor

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Aug 15, 2005
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I quit about six months ago. I found the more I somked the more paranoid I became. I don't think I will ever be the happy, carefree person I use to be. It's been too long and I know I will most likely remain in treatment the rest of my life.

I find keeping busy helps me. But I also find it difficult to relax.

I took the summer off after leaving my last job and spent most of my time redecorating my house. I painted 5 rooms!! When I finish projects I become bored and depressed.

Being alone can be difficult for me and I know it shouldn't be that way. I miss hanging out with friends. But everyone is so busy with their lives and I understand that.

Over the years I developed friendships with people who smoked pot and drank and they were not quality relationships and fizzled out in time. Relationships can be hard.

I have three girlfirends and a sister and our relationship is basically telephonic. We don't get together much, which bothers me. My sister has issues of depression too.
 

dor

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
23
Points
1
I quit about six months ago. I found the more I somked the more paranoid I became. I don't think I will ever be the happy, carefree person I use to be. It's been too long and I know I will most likely remain in treatment the rest of my life.

I find keeping busy helps me. But I also find it difficult to relax.

I took the summer off after leaving my last job and spent most of my time redecorating my house. I painted 5 rooms!! When I finish projects I become bored and depressed.

Being alone can be difficult for me and I know it shouldn't be that way. I miss hanging out with friends. But everyone is so busy with their lives and I understand that.

Over the years I developed friendships with people who smoked pot and drank and they were not quality relationships and fizzled out in time. Relationships can be hard.

I have three girlfirends and a sister and our relationship is basically telephonic. We don't get together much, which bothers me. My sister has issues of depression too.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
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Messages
37,968
Points
113
If it's only been six months, some of the symptoms may yet subside. For at least one of my clients, it took about a year.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
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Messages
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If it's only been six months, some of the symptoms may yet subside. For at least one of my clients, it took about a year.
 

dor

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Aug 15, 2005
Messages
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Points
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Thats good to hear. My symptoms of paranoia have subsided but return from time to time.

Thanks for the support.
 

dor

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
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Points
1
Thats good to hear. My symptoms of paranoia have subsided but return from time to time.

Thanks for the support.
 

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