• Quote of the Day
    "Your living is determined not so much by what life brings to you as by the attitude you bring to life;
    not so much by what happens to you as by the way your mind looks at what happens."
    Kahlil Gibran, posted by David Baxter

Daniel

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Dogs descended from wolves, and we all know wolves hunt for their food. It’s this predator and prey relationship that attracts dogs to squeak toys.

The squeak in the toy sounds like an animal that is injured or scared. This sound sparks your dog’s inner drive to attack. Once the toy stops squeaking (aka, your dog has broken the squeaker), it tells your dog that it has successfully “killed” its prey and it no longer needs to attack.
 

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Tool for making homemade pet food:


BILLIONS OF FREE & INSTANT CUSTOM RECIPES

We have invested over 40,000 programming hours to creating a free and dynamic tool that can formulate recipes in seconds that are appropriate for long-term feeding. Our software technology is unparalleled and provides a safe way to feed fresh food to pets
 

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Your panting pooch needs some relief from the summer heat and a wading pool is one of the best ways to keep your dog cool during the summer. He can splash in it, or treat it like the doggie equivalent of a Venti Caramel Frapp from Starbucks.
 

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Kale contains several potentially harmful natural compounds, including calcium oxalate and isothiocyanates.

Calcium oxalate, according to veterinarian Mara Ratnofsky, can cause health issues such as kidney and bladder stones. These issues usually resolve with veterinary treatment, but are a good argument against feeding kale ribs to dogs as a tasty treat. Dogs that are prone to kidney or bladder stones should avoid other foods with high calcium oxalate contents. These include spinach, beet greens, roots of beets, Swiss chard, collards, parsley, collards, leeks, quinoa, okra, and, of course, kale.

Isothiocyanates, which are also found in broccoli, pose another problem. Isothiocyanates have been associated with a lower risk for cancer in humans. In dogs, they can cause mild to potentially severe gastric irritation. Dr. Jerry Klein, chief veterinary officer for the AKC, states, “Broccoli is considered safe for dogs if the total amount ingested is less than 10 percent of their daily intake. Over 25 percent may be considered toxic.” Since broccoli and kale have similar levels of this compound and are from the same vegetable family, we can assume that while kale could be safe in small quantities, it should be avoided as a regular treat.
 

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Where is valley fever found?​

This soil-dwelling fungus has adapted to survive in desert climates and is prevalent in certain parts of Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, northwestern Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. It has been also reported in south-central Washington State. Infections rates vary greatly by county, and not all the factors that contribute to the rate of infection in an area have been determined. Valley fever tends to occur during certain seasons...

Dogs appear to be very susceptible to infections with valley fever, probably because they sniff the ground and dig in the dirt, potentially inhaling large numbers of spores at a time...

The disease is contracted by inhaling fungal spores. The disease cannot be directly transmitted from person to person, nor can it be transmitted from people to animals. In other words, an animal with valley fever is not contagious to other pets or your family members...

In dogs that have a weak immune system because of age or underlying illness, serious illness can develop, therefore, both very young puppies and senior dogs are more susceptible to illness from valley fever. In these patients, the spherules continue to grow and eventually burst, releasing more infectious organisms to spread throughout the lungs or to other organs in the body where the cycle repeats itself over and over.

Valley fever can take two main forms of disease in the dog, the primary disease and the disseminated disease.

The primary disease is limited to the lungs. Signs of primary valley fever include a harsh dry cough, a fever, a lack of appetite, and lethargy or depression. These signs usually occur about three weeks after infection although sometimes, the organism can lay dormant in the body for up to three years before signs occur.

In the disseminated disease the fungus has disseminated or spread to other parts of the body. The bones and joints are most commonly infected, and lameness is the most common sign. The joints may become swollen and painful. Other signs are non-specific and may include lack of appetite, lethargy, or depression, a persistent fever, and weight loss. Infection can occur in the eye causing inflammation and sometimes blindness. In rare cases, the fungus invades the brain, resulting in seizure activity.

At the present time, dogs that develop valley fever require lengthy treatment with antifungal medications. The duration of treatment will depend on the severity of infection. In many cases treatment will be required for 6-12 months. If the fungus has invaded the nervous system, the dog may require antifungal medication for life...
 

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Three Tips to Reduce Barking in Your Dog

Reinforce an Alternative Behavior

Imagine your dog sitting nicely on a mat while you open the door to let a guest in, receive a delivery, or just walk out the door to get the mail. Teaching your dog to “go” to a mat or stationing can help achieve this goal. Remote treat dispensers can easily help you reward your dog in place with a click of the remote.
 

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In general, all normal dogs...have a breathing rate between 15-30 breaths every minute when they are resting calmly or sleeping.

Lower rates are possible and are no cause for concern providing your pet is otherwise acting normally. It is considered normal for breathing rates to be much higher than this when dogs are hot, stressed, or active.

Resting/sleeping breathing rates that are consistently greater than 30 per minute are increased and considered abnormal. In some cases, even rates lower than 30 per minute may be considered increased and abnormal by your veterinarian. You should ask your veterinarian what rate is considered increased and abnormal for your dog.
 

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At 100 percent specificity, the test has been shown to detect 74 percent of lymphomas and 89 percent of hemangiosarcomas, which are two of the most common cancers in dogs, comprising approximately one-third of canine cancers, Texas A&M says.

“As with human cancers, early diagnosis is key, and this testing will not only save dogs’ lives, but will offer dogs a better quality of life through earlier treatment,” says John August, BVetMed, MS, MRCVS, DACVIM (SAIM), dean of CVMBS.
 
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Are beans good for dogs?​

Yes. Beans can be a part of a dog’s healthy diet. They are rich in fiber and have some protein, too. Dogs can have beans as a treat. That means they should never be more than 10 percent of your dog’s daily calorie intake. Since beans can be high in calories, you should not be feeding him many.

What types of beans can dogs have?​

Your dog can eat a variety of beans. Some he may enjoy are:

  • Black beans
  • Lima beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Pinto beans
  • Garbanzo beans
  • Navy beans
  • Edamame
  • Soybeans

How should beans for dogs be prepared?​

“Beans have to be prepared the way they would be for people,” explains Purina Senior Nutritionist Jan Dempsey. Beans already contain a lot of fiber, but uncooked they are almost indigestible. Dogs can have beans or legumes that have been soaked first and then cooked. This helps your dog digest them and may help reduce flatulence. (Beans may still give your dog some gas!)

Can dogs have beans instead of meat?​

No. Dogs can eat soybeans, but feeding just beans is bad for dogs if it’s replacing meat in their diet. Feeding dogs a diet rich in soybeans, like a human vegetarian diet, won’t give your dog the quality protein he needs. Even though dogs are omnivores, they need quality sources of protein and beans just don't have enough.

Can dogs eat green beans?​

Yes! Green beans are good for dogs. But the name is confusing. Green beans are a vegetable. They aren’t in the bean family like other legumes. But letting your dog have green beans is healthy, and dogs enjoy eating them, too.

Green beans for dogs are best served fresh or cooked. “Shy away from canned vegetables,” Dempsey advises. “They often have added sodium and potentially have preservatives. That is just adding excess salt and other things they don’t really need to their diet.” The ideal green beans for dogs are raw green beans in your store’s produce section.

Another option are green beans that are flash-frozen. “To prepare pre-cooked and frozen beans, steam them or microwave them to thaw until they are ready to serve,” Dempsey suggests.
 

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“One of the most common health problems for dogs is being overweight or obese and it is unfortunately common that when we do tests on the commercial meat-based diets, there are more calories.”

“We also know the health hazards associated with overconsumption of meat and dairy for people and it’s often the same ingredients.”

“Although we would not recommend it, it is theoretically possible to feed a dog a vegetarian diet, but owners would need to take expert veterinary advice to avoid dietary deficiencies and associated disease.”
 

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...Dr. Safdar Khan, senior director of toxicology research at the A.S.P.C.A. Animal Poison Control Center, which runs a 24-hour hot line for pet owners (1-888-426-4435; fees apply), urged pet owners, "You must, must check with your vet" before giving pets human medicines. Imodium, for example, can mask underlying causes of diarrhea, like parasites. And drugs like Pepto Bismol contain aspirin, he said, which can irritate a dog's digestive tract and cause severe damage to cats.

But ibuprofen "is a double whammy," said Dr. Amy Attas, my vet and founder of City Pets, a veterinary house call service. It can cause ulcers and bleeding in the intestinal tract and damage the kidneys. High doses can cause fatal renal failure.

There are many other canine poisons in the medicine cabinet as well. Acetaminophen, the key ingredient in Tylenol, is toxic to dogs and cats because the liver enzyme responsible for its breakdown works differently in cats and dogs than it does in people. One dose can kill a cat.

And as for chocolate, a few chocolate bits or a chocolate chip cookie is not going to kill your dog, Dr. Attas said. But lots of dark chocolate, the kind often used in baking, can be deadly. It has a caffeine-like ingredient that damages the canine central nervous system.

Other foods to avoid: grapes and raisins can lead to kidney failure. A lot of onions "say, if a dog gets into the garbage and eats the onion-covered chicken" can prompt anemia, which can be fatal. And macadamia nuts can cause muscle tremors, weakness, vomiting and dangerously high body temperatures.

The worst, Dr. Attas said, are artificial sweeteners. Xylitol, the ingredient in most sugar-free gums, causes sugar levels to plummet in dogs, and may damage their livers too. In a paper in the Journal of the Veterinary Medical Association, researchers reported the deaths of four of eight dogs that had eaten xylitol-laden desserts...
 

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As with humans, exercise can be a great stress reducer. Physical activities like walking or playing fetch help both you and your dog release tension. It is also good to provide your dog with a safe place in the home where he can escape anxious situations. Everybody enjoys a calm place to retreat.
 

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Dry dog foods have potentially a grain mite that cross reacts with house dust mites, which a lot of dogs are allergic to. So switching a dog’s diet can actually reduce their exposure to some allergens and things.

Bathing out allergic animals frequently can help to reduce the pollens and things that they’re allergic to and from their coat that they’re either being exposed to in their skin or breathing in when they’re grooming and licking themselves.

Cool water for bathing provides a little bit of more anti-itch properties than warm water. It’s hard to do in the winter, but it does help to decrease the itch by doing cool water. And then there’s a lot of dogs that lick their feet from their allergies a lot and they’ll get yeast infections in their feet.

And then that gets itchy. So for some of those dogs, I’ll do things like little vinegar soaks for their feet, because it doesn’t matter if they lick it off. And vinegar is a very good anti yeast type of agent. So. There are a lot of things you can do that take a lot of work, but that you can do to try to decrease the exposure to pollens in general, or oak trees or whatever it is they’re allergic to.

And a good clean diet, I think does help reduce that.
 

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Search "fear free" providers:


"Fear Free Certified Professionals not only look out for your pets’ physical health but also their emotional wellbeing. Whether you are looking for a veterinary or pet professional who knows how to handle a fearful, anxious, or stressed-out pet, or you simply want the best care possible for your four-legged friend, a Fear Free Certified Professional is here to help."
 
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Dogs cool down a lot differently than we do, and shaving really has no big impact on cooling them down. Dogs rely on panting to control most of their temperature regulation. They also rely on vasodilation (blood vessel expansion) to help them cool off, especially on their ears and face.
 

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