• Quote of the Day
    "In the end, only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you lived,
    and how gracefully you let go of things not meant for you."
    The Buddha, posted by David Baxter

Kuroshashu

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Hello all.
It occurred to me a few days ago to wonder how many lives I've taken. Let me explain. When I'm in the wrong mood, the tiniest thing can get me doing all sorts of nasty things. Now, I realise that is my problem, but the one who wronged me bears a little responsibility. A tiny amount, but an amount regardless. Now, when I think of the number of people who I wrong in the course of a day (significantly less now that I'm unemployed, but still), how many of those go on to do themselves a mischief? How much blame can be attributed to me? A little arseholery here and a little arseholery there... I can imagine it adding up. Admittedly this sounds a little wacky, but then, even if the sum-total is only 0.1 of a life, that's still a profound impact.
 

Daniel

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Now, I realise that is my problem, but the one who wronged me bears a little responsibility.

Well, there's the stoic point by Nietzsche that "that which doesn't kill me, makes me stronger." So Nietzsche would argue they may actually be doing you a favor. So, for example, if someone inconveniences me, that may be helping me in the long-term by increasing my frustration tolerance. A similar point that is less extreme:

...one can use injury for their own spiritual enlightenment.

Bob Thurman Podcast: Self and Selflessness Video #4
 
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Kuroshashu

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Good answer, but surely 0.1 of a suicide is more significant than, say, 0.2 of a stoic strengthening, as the suicide is permanent and usually has massive secondary effects, much more so than the strengthening.
 

Daniel

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Are you suggesting that people may be partially responsible for the suicides of others? I think that is very, very rare.
A possible exception involving bullying:

A real person, a real death: Suicide follows online hoax

(Also, wouldn't such a perspective based on blame and secondary factors (rather than personal responsibility and professional treatment) allow for people with depression to emotionally blackmail others? For example, a husband with a history of depression could emotionally blackmail his wife by saying: "If you file for divorce, I will kill myself.")
 
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Kuroshashu

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Do people not emotionally blackmail each-other with suicide? My father does it a fair bit and it is effective in that it achieves the desired result (not endorsing). Does this imply some truth to the idea?
 

Daniel

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Do people not emotionally blackmail each-other with suicide?

My guess is that most people who are suicidal do not engage in emotional blackmail, at least explicitly.

Does this imply some truth to the idea?

Not necessarily. My guess would be that those with a history of depression who engage in emotional blackmail are less likely to commit suicide than those with a history of depression who do not.
 

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