More threads by dave83

dave83

Member
Does anyone on this forum have psychosis or know anyone with psychosis? Does anyone know any way to help to get rid of it without the use of drugs?
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
Yes, there are several members here who are well acquainted with a psychotic illness either personally, or professionally, or through someone close to them.

John Nash (A Beautiful Mind) notwithstanding, no you cannot get rid of psychosis without the use of medication. Mr. Nash was and is a unique individual with an extraordinary mind, and even he did not "get rid of" his psychotic symptoms - he merely learned to challenge them and/or push them away, and most people would be incapable of doing that.
 

ThatLady

Member
I know of no case of psychosis, dave, that can be "gotten rid of" without professional counselling and the right medications taken as directed. There isn't any magic wand, and there isn't any easy way, darn it! I wish there were! :hug:
 

ThatLady

Member
Shock therapy isn't a first line treatment, dave. It's more a treatment of last resort, when other treatments don't work, or when the patient cannot tolerate other treatment regimens. It's not a cure-all, believe me. Much better to find a good therapist and a medication, or combination of medications that works well and doesn't result in intractable side-effects. :)
 
I have had psychotic illness for several years and could not possibly manage without both medicine and therapy. Even with both, it's a struggle, but with the right medicine I am able to work, albeit with certain limitations. I think part of the key is learning (and the therapist helps me with this) what my symptoms are and limitations so that I can better care for myself.
 

Miette

Member
I have been through two episodes, one that resolved without drugs, and one that was treated, just recently. I will always treat it from now on because the drugs worked so quickly and effectively, my thoughts basically are: why torture yourself if you don't need to?
 

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