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lallieth

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While the medication takes away the anxiety symptoms,I have to vent and say that the side effects suck!

I know from experience they won't last and what to expect,but it doesn't make it any easier when you are dizzy or fatigued or nauseated..

The worst one for me this time around is the appetite..I get hungry but have to gag food down..I know that soon this will pass,and my appetite will return full force,but right now I am limited to the things I can eat



I have to keep telling myself...a couple more weeks and this too shall pass..:mad:
 

Retired

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Consider this analogy:

You are in a rush to get home from work, driving your car along a busy expressway when suddenly the traffic grounds to a halt!

After five minutes, you begin feeling the frustration, because you know there's a warm meal waiting at home and there's an evening engagement later. If things don't get moving...you'll be late.

Ten minutes later, there's no sign of movement, exhaust fumes are giving you a headache and traffic is not moving.

A bit later it begins to move and as you approach the cause of the congestion, you see a car has burned and the occupants are seriously injured and are being transferred to an ambulance.

Understanding the cause of the problem often lessens the anxiety produced by the problem.

Perhaps you don't feel as angry and frustrated over the delay because you now know the cause of the problem.

It may help to understand the mechanism of action of the medication you are taking in order to deal with the adverse effects you may be experiencing.

I'm not sure what medication you are taking, but let's assume it's one of the newer specific neurotransmitter modifiers that treat anxiety and/or depression.

Although the newer medications have been designed to target specific neurotransmitters (usually Serotonin and or Norepinephrine) they are pretty good at doing that, but because of the nature of neurochemistry, other neurotransmitter systems are collaterally affected, usually to a lesser extent.

These other neurotransmitter systems are responsible for some of the adverse effects you might be experiencing, but as you correctly state, once your brain chemistry acclimates itself to the new neurochemical levels, many if not most of these side effects diminish.

Based on the literature this time frame can be from two to six weeks.

However if the adverse effects are unbearable, they should be reported to your prescribing physician, because often there are adjunctive medications that can be added to mediate some of the side effects.

Or the physician may choose to modify the dose or even switch to another compound if you are unable to tolerate the one causing the difficulty.

Communication with the prescribing doctor is important because there are often strategies to lessen the adverse effects.

Do you have a communication arrangement with your doctor where you can call to report any problems you may be having?
 

lallieth

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Consider this analogy:

You are in a rush to get home from work, driving your car along a busy expressway when suddenly the traffic grounds to a halt!

After five minutes, you begin feeling the frustration, because you know there's a warm meal waiting at home and there's an evening engagement later. If things don't get moving...you'll be late.

Ten minutes later, there's no sign of movement, exhaust fumes are giving you a headache and traffic is not moving.

A bit later it begins to move and as you approach the cause of the congestion, you see a car has burned and the occupants are seriously injured and are being transferred to an ambulance.

Understanding the cause of the problem often lessens the anxiety produced by the problem.

Perhaps you don't feel as angry and frustrated over the delay because you now know the cause of the problem.

It may help to understand the mechanism of action of the medication you are taking in order to deal with the adverse effects you may be experiencing.

I'm not sure what medication you are taking, but let's assume it's one of the newer specific neurotransmitter modifiers that treat anxiety and/or depression.

Although the newer medications have been designed to target specific neurotransmitters (usually Serotonin and or Norepinephrine) they are pretty good at doing that, but because of the nature of neurochemistry, other neurotransmitter systems are collaterally affected, usually to a lesser extent.

These other neurotransmitter systems are responsible for some of the adverse effects you might be experiencing, but as you correctly state, once your brain chemistry acclimates itself to the new neurochemical levels, many if not most of these side effects diminish.

Based on the literature this time frame can be from two to six weeks.

However if the adverse effects are unbearable, they should be reported to your prescribing physician, because often there are adjunctive medications that can be added to mediate some of the side effects.

Or the physician may choose to modify the dose or even switch to another compound if you are unable to tolerate the one causing the difficulty.

Communication with the prescribing doctor is important because there are often strategies to lessen the adverse effects.

Do you have a communication arrangement with your doctor where you can call to report any problems you may be having?

Reading this made sense to me in what's going on inside when I take the meds,thanks for that

I have great communication with my dr and will let him know next week how it's coming along.I generally am the one to choose which medications I want to take after doing research and I know what side effects the celexa causes.
I was planning to switch meds next week anyway :)
 

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I generally am the one to choose which medications I want to take after doing research

Prescribing medicaton therapy is a complex skill based largely on a physician's clinical experience, and the expertise in the specialty in which s/he practices. Prescribing is a combination of science and art.

Although I have a fair understanding of medication issues, I rely on my own physician's expertise and clinical experience in guiding medication therapy for me.

That does not mean I will not discuss my options using my learned knowledge, but I cannot say the onus of the prescribing choice has ever been left to me with any of the phsysicans I have consulted over the years.

While I strongly support the concept of being a partner with one's physician in one's health care, I wonder about the the phsysican whose prescribing choice is based on the patient's recommendation.
 

lallieth

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I have been seein my GP for 30 years now,and we have a good patient/dr relationship,based on honesty and open communication.He knows that when it comes to any medication,I do extensive homework,as I want to know exactly what I am putting into my body

If I bring up a particular medication,we will discuss the pro's and con's,side effects etc and we make the decision together whether or not that med is right for me.He always asks to see me within the next couple of weeks to make sure the meds aren't causing any serious problems.

I am on celexa now and want to switch to Lexapro because taking a lower dose of the Lexapro (with the same benefits) makes sense to me rather than having to always up the dosage of the Celexa

When I see my dr next week,we will talk about my desire to switch and decide what is best for me.
 

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I am on celexa now and want to switch to Lexapro because taking a lower dose of the Lexapro (with the same benefits) makes sense to me rather than having to always up the dosage of the Celexa

Would you elaborate on the rationale for this change in medications?
 

lallieth

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Would you elaborate on the rationale for this change in medications?
From the research I have done Lexapro/cipralex, is even more selective than Celexa,having much fewer side effects and getting the same benefits as Celexa at a much lower dosage

As well as Lexapro has shown significant positive results in helping those with anxiety disorders,particularly GAD/panic & anticipatory anxiety,all of which I have,as compared to other SSRI's

Most importantly,the Celexa has stopped working as well as it did when I first started to take it 8 years ago and the dr and I discussed my options of increasing the dosage of Celexa or switching to another SSRI.

I decided to make the switch :)
 

Peanut

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The psychiatrist I just saw told me Celexa and Lexapro have the same active ingrediant. I personally had a bad reaction to Lexapro so she did not reccommend Celexa b/c of their relationship. I don't know if this means anything to you but I thought you might be interested. Good luck if you try it.

I also understand the whole doctor sort of letting you choose the medication. I kept choosing incorrectly though for years and I just gave up and now when they hint at me picking a medication (somewhat arbitrarily) I will not have any part of it!

Anyway, good luck and I agree that side effects suck, at least yours go away!
 

David Baxter

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The psychiatrist I just saw told me Celexa and Lexapro have the same active ingrediant. I personally had a bad reaction to Lexapro so she did not reccommend Celexa b/c of their relationship. I don't know if this means anything to you but I thought you might be interested. Good luck if you try it.

That's true, sort of. Lexapro (also known as Cipralex) is a derivative of Celexa and the modifications in Lexapro do seem to have fewer adverse side effects (or are less likely to produce side-effects) than Celexa. If you care currently taking Celexa and are experiencing side-effects or reduced benefits, Lexapro could be a good choice. On the other hand, your psychiatrist is correct, Peanut - if you're not tolerating Lexapro, it wouldn't make sense to switch to Celexa.
 

lallieth

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Thanks Peanut and Dr Baxter-It's worth a shot at least...I will let you know how it goes..trust me :)
 

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In order to understand the similarities and differences between these two medications, the official product monographs should be consulted:

Lexapro Product Monograph

Celexa Product Monograph

It is not uncommon for pharmacuutical manufacturers to modify the chemical structure of an existing compound and re-release the second compound as a new improved version.

The differences need to be proven through clinical trials which are then submitted to the respective regulatory agencies which then approve the new compound based on the strength of the clinical trials.

The benefit of using one over the other would be determined by published post release reports combined with the clinical experience of the prescibing physician.

The promotional literature of the manufacturer should not be used as the sole criterion for switching.

Celexa has stopped working as well as it did when I first started to take it 8 years ago

Developing a tolerance to a specific compound might well be a valid reason for trying a differnt compound. The physician should be asked if the similarity in structure of Celexa and Lexapro might continue the tolerance.

much fewer side effects and getting the same benefits as Celexa at a much lower dosage

A much lower dosage is not a phrmacological advantage or disadvantage. Dosage has to do with potency and the therapeutic dosage of a given compound is determined by the minimum amount required to achieve a desired effect.

Some compounds require a higher dosage, simply because of the pharmacological properties of that compound. One cannot compare the dosage amount from one compound to another, in order to draw any conclusion about about the number.

To make an analogy, a recipe may need a tablespoon of sugar, while another recipe needs a teaspoon of salt. One cannot draw any conclusion about benefits of salt or sugar because one situation needs a tablespoon of sugar and the other needs a teaspoon of salt.

Sometimes the analogy of a glass of beer vs a jigger of whiskey is also used to illustrate potency.

A similar situation occured several years ago when Serax (oxazepam) was modified in structure to produce Ativan (lorazepam). The therapeutic dose of Serax was 15 mg. while the similar therapeutic dose for Ativan was 1 mg.

There was some clinical differences between the two medications, but the therapeutic effect was determined by the potency of lorazepam which necessitated determining the dose level at 1 mg.

A cynical observer might speculate that pharmaceutical manufacturers develop "the son of the successful medication" as a means to save their market share from erosion as the original becomes eligible for generic copies to be produced, but I am sure this is not the case...;)
 

Peanut

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Holy cow! There is a lot of information here!! Good luck mysts, here is your rx for lexapro: :rx: ;)
 

lallieth

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Holy cow! There is a lot of information here!! Good luck mysts, here is your rx for lexapro: :rx: ;)
Thanks Peanut! My dr and I decided not to change my meds,the celexa is working for now,but should there come a time when it's not effective,we will consider a med change or dosage increase.:)
 

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we will consider a med change or dosage increase

I don't know about these particular medications, but it is worth knowing that not all SSRI's have a linear therapeutic response.

That means that the therapeutic effect of some SSRI's does not increase after a given maximum dose, and that increasing the dose simply increases adverse effects.

This is something your physician should know about, or be able to find out from one of his/her specialist consultants.

I don't know if how this effect may apply to the meds in question, so this info is for your ongoing research. If you should learn anything in this regard about these compounds, please let us know.
 

lallieth

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Hi Steve

We talked about that too,that some medications are not always more effective after a dose increase and that it is possible to max out the dosage of certain SSRI"s without added benefit.

I was assured that we would not try and max out the dosage of Celexa in favor of trying a new medication.I always see him two months after the initial prescription and/or refill and we take it from there

It's early days yet and I have to give Celexa it's full run before I make any more judgements
 

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We talked about that too

It sounds like you have a very well informed physician with whom you have a good relationship. A valuable asset in today's medical care!
 

lallieth

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It sounds like you have a very well informed physician with whom you have a good relationship. A valuable asset in today's medical care!
He is a fantastic doctor..That's why I have stuck with him,even though I live 30 mins from him,he's well worth the trip
 

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