More threads by jo will

jo will

Member
Whenever I talk about a piece of my trauma, it doesn't matter who it is, I end up with nightmares that night. The nightmares may not necessarily relive the actual events, but they are along the same scenario. The emotions are very intense. The next morning I wake up feeling exhausted, emotionally drained, and physically hurt in parts of my body. The emotions from the nightmare stay with me all the next day or so. The next day I am in a mental fague. When will this end? Will it ever go away? I force myself to live through the day by carrying out my normal routine. But it is very tough. Does anyone experience this as well? Do they have any coping methods for this?
 

braveheart

Member
Yes. Me too. Peridically. Have done in the past week.

It seems to me its all part of the working through.

Doing a relaxing and self-nurturing nightime routine [breathing focus, affirmations, reassuring self talk/internal dialogue, and fantasy-visualisation of my 'safe place] help some. Mostly its about surfing the waves.... as it were.. it seems. Writing down and drawing my dreams and nightmares also helps some. It gets them a bit out of my head, and then I can take the pictures to therapy and work with them there.

But... I'm pretty much there too, so will be reading replies with interest.
 

ThatLady

Member
Are you receiving therapy at this time, jo will, or have you received therapy in the past? Also, are you on any medications at this time?

This information will better enable us to answer your questions. :)
 

jo will

Member
I am receiving therapy and have been taking an antidepressant in the morning and trazadone at night. My therapy is not on a regular basis. It is whenever I need it. I have spent 32 weeks of the past two years in a health care centre for the trauma and depression treatment programs. I have finally been able to get a handle on this and go back to work. However, it bites me whenever I talk. I have only realized in the last few months that these symptoms are from talking. So, I am still trying to find a coping strategy.
 

ThatLady

Member
I imagine that, by talking about the trauma and suffering you have undergone, old memories are brought back into the light of day. These are usually memories you've supressed, to some extent - probably, because you really didn't want to have to deal with them. Who would? They're painful! :hug:

Perhaps, since you've found out what's bringing on the nightmares, emotional upheaval, and general aches and pains, you might benefit from increasing the frequency of your therapy sessions for awhile. This will allow you to get these old memories out in the open and deal with them with your therapist on a regular, scheduled basis.

Another thing you might try is to write these feelings, memories, and troublesome thoughts down on paper, or on the computer where you can print them out, and take them along to your therapy appointment so your therapist can read them. That, at least, will save you the initial explaining period and cut down on some of the talking. Then, perhaps your therapist can help you work out a way to deal with these traumatic events in some way that will minimize the need to verbalize the difficult details. This might be through role-playing, or any number of other methods that your therapist might have up his/her sleeve.

The thing is, in order to get past these troubling events and their effect on you, they're going to have to be dealt with somehow.

Please keep us informed, and feel free to "talk" about things here - at least, those you feel you CAN talk about. Many seem to find it much easier to write things out than to actually sit face to face with another human being and verbalize them.
 

jo will

Member
Thank you very much for the advice. Your advice confirmed what my gut instincts were telling me. I am at a point where I have finally taken back control of my life since the PTSD took over three years ago. So now I am reluctant to talk even to my psychologist because, I am reeling for the next couple of days. I do not want to continue living like this. I want to be able to go on with my life, without the "smack inthe face" whenever I talk or I am faced with a trigger. I will continue to persevere and keep working on it.
Thank you very much.
 

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