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David Baxter

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Implications of naturalistic use of pharmacotherapy in CBT treatment for panic disorder
by Joanna J. Archa, and Michelle G. Craskea
Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles

Abstract
This study examined naturalistic medication use and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment outcomes in 105 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder (PD), assessed by structured clinical interview. The association between pre- and post-treatment use of SSRIs, benzodiazepines (BZs), and any anti-anxiety or anti-depressant (A/D) medication were investigated for three indicators of treatment outcome (PD severity, presence of agoraphobia (AG), anxiety sensitivity) at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. Controlling for pre-treatment severity, pre-treatment SSRI use was associated with worse outcomes for AG (p=.04) and anxiety sensitivity (p=.047); post-treatment SSRI use was associated with delayed improvements in PD severity (p=.05). Pre-treatment use of A/D was associated with poorer PD severity outcomes (p=.04). Post-treatment use of A/D was associated with higher anxiety sensitivity scores across post-treatment and 6-month follow-up (p=.03). BZ use was not associated with significantly worse outcomes. However, there was a decrease in the number of patients using BZs from pre-treatment to post-treatment (p=.06) and follow-up (p=.006). In conclusion, controlling for pre-treatment severity, pre- and post-treatment use of SSRIs and A/D was associated with poorer outcomes, particularly for PD severity and anxiety sensitivity.

Behaviour Research and Therapy
Volume 45, Issue 7, July 2007, Pages 1435-1447
 

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