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    Marsha Linehan, posted by Daniel

no_name

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I am contemplating this idea at the present moment. Can a person, using the correct treatment options (talk therapy + determination + diet + relaxation) be cured of anxiety disorders?

Or is it really something chronic and must be treated with medications (SSRI, etc.)?
 

no_name

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I am contemplating this idea at the present moment. Can a person, using the correct treatment options (talk therapy + determination + diet + relaxation) be cured of anxiety disorders?

Or is it really something chronic and must be treated with medications (SSRI, etc.)?
 

David Baxter

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It depends on the individual and the disorder.

Some can be cured completely -- others can be managed so that they no longer interefere significantly with day to day living and the enjoyment of life.

Some may require long-term or even life-long use of medication, although not necessarily at full dose -- but most will respond to relatively short-term medication (i.e., weeks to 1-3 years).
 

David Baxter

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It depends on the individual and the disorder.

Some can be cured completely -- others can be managed so that they no longer interefere significantly with day to day living and the enjoyment of life.

Some may require long-term or even life-long use of medication, although not necessarily at full dose -- but most will respond to relatively short-term medication (i.e., weeks to 1-3 years).
 

no_name

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Is medication really required in treating anxiety disorders? Or are they used now to make the treatment process easier and shorter?
 

no_name

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Is medication really required in treating anxiety disorders? Or are they used now to make the treatment process easier and shorter?
 

David Baxter

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Again, it depends on the specific anxiety disorder -- I think they are very beneficial in treating most anxiety disorders and perhaps essential for some disorders or individuals, recognizing that like most disorders anxiety disorders vary greatly in severity and in symptoms from one individual to the next.
 

David Baxter

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Again, it depends on the specific anxiety disorder -- I think they are very beneficial in treating most anxiety disorders and perhaps essential for some disorders or individuals, recognizing that like most disorders anxiety disorders vary greatly in severity and in symptoms from one individual to the next.
 

Retired

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Whatever mode of therapy that succeeds for a given individual, my impression is the ultimate goal in treating depression or anxiety disorders is to have more good days than bad days,

Initially there are more bad days that good days, then with the proper support and therapy, the number of good days increase.

Even when there are more good days than bad days, one might experience a relapse, but just knowing the good days will return makes riding out the down time easier.

Perhaps the use of medications like minor tranquilizers (benzodiazepines) during the initial phase of treating anxiety disorders can take the edge off. allowing other forms of supportive therapy to take effect. Then, if deemed appropriate, the meds might be tapered or withdrawn.

Is my concept consistent with current practice?
 

Retired

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Whatever mode of therapy that succeeds for a given individual, my impression is the ultimate goal in treating depression or anxiety disorders is to have more good days than bad days,

Initially there are more bad days that good days, then with the proper support and therapy, the number of good days increase.

Even when there are more good days than bad days, one might experience a relapse, but just knowing the good days will return makes riding out the down time easier.

Perhaps the use of medications like minor tranquilizers (benzodiazepines) during the initial phase of treating anxiety disorders can take the edge off. allowing other forms of supportive therapy to take effect. Then, if deemed appropriate, the meds might be tapered or withdrawn.

Is my concept consistent with current practice?
 

David Baxter

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Yes, or at least my current practice. The goal is (1) to have the client on the minimum amount of medication to bring down the anxiety to a manageable level so that we can then (2) institute strategies for other coping strategies and finally (3) reduce the medication or discontinue it once the new coping strategies are in place and working.
 

David Baxter

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Yes, or at least my current practice. The goal is (1) to have the client on the minimum amount of medication to bring down the anxiety to a manageable level so that we can then (2) institute strategies for other coping strategies and finally (3) reduce the medication or discontinue it once the new coping strategies are in place and working.
 

zero seven

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I have anxiety and my doctor gave me a perscription I started last Sunday. She also said we should schedule appointments with a Psych, but we haven't found one available yet.

She said to start the meds at a slow rate(5mg for 5 days, twice a day), then up it 5mg for another 5 days, then finally take 15mg indefinately.

I haven't done too well with it so far... anger like I haven't felt before, pain til I passed out and then threw up, and everything hurts most of the time. Except for the few days I was angry, I'm still scared and nervous about a lot of things.

Anxiety isn't the source of my problems... but my family doctor said she didn't want to be the primary care giver for my situation, and we haven't found an available psych yet.

I'm kind of discouraged, so far the medicine has been almost worse than the problem, but I have to deal with both now.
 

zero seven

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I have anxiety and my doctor gave me a perscription I started last Sunday. She also said we should schedule appointments with a Psych, but we haven't found one available yet.

She said to start the meds at a slow rate(5mg for 5 days, twice a day), then up it 5mg for another 5 days, then finally take 15mg indefinately.

I haven't done too well with it so far... anger like I haven't felt before, pain til I passed out and then threw up, and everything hurts most of the time. Except for the few days I was angry, I'm still scared and nervous about a lot of things.

Anxiety isn't the source of my problems... but my family doctor said she didn't want to be the primary care giver for my situation, and we haven't found an available psych yet.

I'm kind of discouraged, so far the medicine has been almost worse than the problem, but I have to deal with both now.
 

zero seven

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David Baxter said:
What is the medication, zero? Some of these take a while to adapt to...

Buspirone is the name. It says substituted for Buspar.

Ah that night I wrote that was the worst I've had yet... worst headache I think I've ever had. The bottle says not to take non-perscription stuff along with it so I didn't.

Anyway since that night I haven't had as much trouble with this med, but figure it will be much the same when it comes time to up to the full 15mg.

The real problem though... I don't "feel" any better. But this won't be like having a cold where a little meds will fix me up, huh?
 

zero seven

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David Baxter said:
What is the medication, zero? Some of these take a while to adapt to...

Buspirone is the name. It says substituted for Buspar.

Ah that night I wrote that was the worst I've had yet... worst headache I think I've ever had. The bottle says not to take non-perscription stuff along with it so I didn't.

Anyway since that night I haven't had as much trouble with this med, but figure it will be much the same when it comes time to up to the full 15mg.

The real problem though... I don't "feel" any better. But this won't be like having a cold where a little meds will fix me up, huh?
 

David Baxter

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The meds alone probably can't do everything. They also often do take time to work. I've only had one client that I can recall on Buspar so I'm not as familiar with that one as I am with most.
 

David Baxter

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The meds alone probably can't do everything. They also often do take time to work. I've only had one client that I can recall on Buspar so I'm not as familiar with that one as I am with most.
 

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