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Anna

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Joined
Jul 25, 2005
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I am a bit wary of the fact that I am using my real name in this forum but it's too late now. I guess it's OK because I don't have anything to hide. It is interesting to note the reaction of the three people I have told my diagnosis to: my mum, my brother Nick and my friend Lauren. All three were rather dismissive and none of them asked what my symptoms are. My friend Lauren just said 'I don't reckon you've got it ('it' being schizophrneia) without explaining why she thought that or what she thought schizophrennia meant. I'm not blaming her, just observing. My mum said she knows about schizphrenia because her aunty margaret has it. But i would say if you have come into contact with just one person with schizophrenia that donesn't make you an expert on the topic, because any two people with it can have very different symptoms and still be classified under the same heading. Aunty margarets symptoms are different to mine. She had very florid hallucinations and would talk to herself and to certain beings which were obviously the poroduct of her hallucinations. So i think nmmum was thinking i don't have it becuase i don't have the same symptoms as Aunty Margaret. Thirdly, my brother nick told his psychiatrist of my diagnosis and she said it was extremely unlikeley that i have schizophrenia. She made no query as to what my sumptoms are. But said there was no prodrmal stage, no family history, and my age of onset is too late. I disagree with all three points. The familty history being aunty margaret and possibly my grandfather, the prodromal stage being the post natal deptreeeion i had, and the age of onset 27, not being unusual. The reactions i have had so far want to make me try and hide it but i don't think that's a good idea either. I have four brothers and two sisters and two parents. so most of my family don't know of my diagnosis but i don't think there's anything gained from telling them . saldly for me though, they are unable to help if they don't know what's wrong.
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
I am a bit wary of the fact that I am using my real name in this forum but it's too late now. I guess it's OK because I don't have anything to hide. It is interesting to note the reaction of the three people I have told my diagnosis to: my mum, my brother Nick and my friend Lauren. All three were rather dismissive and none of them asked what my symptoms are. My friend Lauren just said 'I don't reckon you've got it ('it' being schizophrneia) without explaining why she thought that or what she thought schizophrennia meant. I'm not blaming her, just observing. My mum said she knows about schizphrenia because her aunty margaret has it. But i would say if you have come into contact with just one person with schizophrenia that donesn't make you an expert on the topic, because any two people with it can have very different symptoms and still be classified under the same heading. Aunty margarets symptoms are different to mine. She had very florid hallucinations and would talk to herself and to certain beings which were obviously the poroduct of her hallucinations. So i think nmmum was thinking i don't have it becuase i don't have the same symptoms as Aunty Margaret. Thirdly, my brother nick told his psychiatrist of my diagnosis and she said it was extremely unlikeley that i have schizophrenia. She made no query as to what my sumptoms are. But said there was no prodrmal stage, no family history, and my age of onset is too late. I disagree with all three points. The familty history being aunty margaret and possibly my grandfather, the prodromal stage being the post natal deptreeeion i had, and the age of onset 27, not being unusual. The reactions i have had so far want to make me try and hide it but i don't think that's a good idea either. I have four brothers and two sisters and two parents. so most of my family don't know of my diagnosis but i don't think there's anything gained from telling them . saldly for me though, they are unable to help if they don't know what's wrong.
 

David Baxter

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Messages
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Your member name can be changed if you wish -- send me a private message or email to request this.

I'm a bit confused about your post, though. Who made the diagnosis of schizophrenia?
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
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Messages
37,968
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Your member name can be changed if you wish -- send me a private message or email to request this.

I'm a bit confused about your post, though. Who made the diagnosis of schizophrenia?
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
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Points
1
OK. I am thinking about changing my member name, am not sure what to yet, will let you know soon.

The Dr who made my diagnosis is a psychiatrist in Sydney I have been seeing for approximately two years. Her didn't actually say 'You have schizophrenia' but when i asked him 'Do you think the symptoms I have been experiencing over the last year or so fall under the heading of schizophrenia?' and he replied in the affirmative.

Please let me know if there's anything else you're confued about and i will do my best to clarify.
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
OK. I am thinking about changing my member name, am not sure what to yet, will let you know soon.

The Dr who made my diagnosis is a psychiatrist in Sydney I have been seeing for approximately two years. Her didn't actually say 'You have schizophrenia' but when i asked him 'Do you think the symptoms I have been experiencing over the last year or so fall under the heading of schizophrenia?' and he replied in the affirmative.

Please let me know if there's anything else you're confued about and i will do my best to clarify.
 

David Baxter

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Messages
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Sorry. I read this before your introduction thread, which made it a bit more clear.

While there may be more than one diagnosis that could fit the symptoms you describe, I'm not sure it matters all that much at this point in terms of how your treatment will proceed. Your psychiatrist is certainly in a better position to know than the family members.

On the other hand, maybe your best bet is to let them believe whatever they wish to believe as long as they aren't attempting to interfere in your treatment. To use other words, if it please them to think they are right and you kow they are wrong, do you really care what they believe?

My youngest son can be like that -- even when we all know he's wrong, he insists on being "right". My strategy is just to let him have the last word, if it's that important to him.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
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Messages
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Sorry. I read this before your introduction thread, which made it a bit more clear.

While there may be more than one diagnosis that could fit the symptoms you describe, I'm not sure it matters all that much at this point in terms of how your treatment will proceed. Your psychiatrist is certainly in a better position to know than the family members.

On the other hand, maybe your best bet is to let them believe whatever they wish to believe as long as they aren't attempting to interfere in your treatment. To use other words, if it please them to think they are right and you kow they are wrong, do you really care what they believe?

My youngest son can be like that -- even when we all know he's wrong, he insists on being "right". My strategy is just to let him have the last word, if it's that important to him.
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
Thanks for your reply. No, I guess it doesn't really matter what my family and friends think. It's pretty silly going through life constantly worrying about what others think of you. Maybe it is best to just let them be. When my brother was diagnosed with anorexia the hospital gave my parents a big fat wad of reading material in a folder, on how to be supportive etc. but I'm pretty sure they didn't read it. Why am I telling you this? I don't know. I think I'm trying to make the point that my family in general (excluding my brother Nick) copes by sweeping mental illnesss under the carpet and pretending everything's normal. I guess the hard thing for me is when friends / aquaintances ask 'how have you been? How's life?' etc, i don't know how much to explain. On the one hand I could say 'I'm fine thanks', which is not really honest or I could say 'not very well' and tell them my diagnosis. To answer my own query, i guess it depends on how close you are to someone. i.e aqauinances don't need to know of my illness, but close friends and family deserve more honsety and a fuller explanation. Does this mean I should tell the rest of my family of my diagnosis? To be frank, I couln't be bothered because I know I won't get an encouraging or supportive answer. It's hard going solo. Hope this makes sense and is not too waffly. One more brief point: If my son develops a mental or physical illness i would want to find out as much about it as possible because the more knowledge i have the more supportive I can be, and I would be hurt if he tried to hide his illness from me.

[/quote]
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
Thanks for your reply. No, I guess it doesn't really matter what my family and friends think. It's pretty silly going through life constantly worrying about what others think of you. Maybe it is best to just let them be. When my brother was diagnosed with anorexia the hospital gave my parents a big fat wad of reading material in a folder, on how to be supportive etc. but I'm pretty sure they didn't read it. Why am I telling you this? I don't know. I think I'm trying to make the point that my family in general (excluding my brother Nick) copes by sweeping mental illnesss under the carpet and pretending everything's normal. I guess the hard thing for me is when friends / aquaintances ask 'how have you been? How's life?' etc, i don't know how much to explain. On the one hand I could say 'I'm fine thanks', which is not really honest or I could say 'not very well' and tell them my diagnosis. To answer my own query, i guess it depends on how close you are to someone. i.e aqauinances don't need to know of my illness, but close friends and family deserve more honsety and a fuller explanation. Does this mean I should tell the rest of my family of my diagnosis? To be frank, I couln't be bothered because I know I won't get an encouraging or supportive answer. It's hard going solo. Hope this makes sense and is not too waffly. One more brief point: If my son develops a mental or physical illness i would want to find out as much about it as possible because the more knowledge i have the more supportive I can be, and I would be hurt if he tried to hide his illness from me.

[/quote]
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,968
Points
113
I generally advise people to answer the question "How are you?" with something generic like "Not too bad"...

It is entirely up to you who you choose to share information like this with -- you cerainly do not need to share anything with anyone, unless you wish to and feel safe doing so.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,968
Points
113
I generally advise people to answer the question "How are you?" with something generic like "Not too bad"...

It is entirely up to you who you choose to share information like this with -- you cerainly do not need to share anything with anyone, unless you wish to and feel safe doing so.
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
Thanks for your thoughts, David. 'Not too bad', is a handy answer to have up one's sleeve.
 

Anna

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
24
Points
1
Thanks for your thoughts, David. 'Not too bad', is a handy answer to have up one's sleeve.
 

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