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sunset

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Only a couple of people know I go, because its like if people hear that, they think you are crazy or something. I dont think I am crazy, but am afraid others will view me like that. I find myself saying, if asked, that I have an appt, and leave it at that. If they press or inquire further, I say just getting a checkup...
Do you hide the fact that you go and talk to a therapist? Is it normal to feel this way?

It's weird, because I want to appear normal to my therapist!!!! Let alone others..

Any thoughts?
 

Retired

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

Seeing a mental health therapist should be perceived in the same way as seeing one's Family Physician, Gynecologist or barber for that matter.? Even though there is greater awareness about the prevalence of psychological, emotional and psychiatric disorders in this twenty first century, there is still a stigma attached to mental disorders in some circles.

IMO whether one shares this information ought to be on a need to know basis.? There does not seem to be any benefit, in my view, to tell everyone you encounter;? however there may be some people on whom you would want to count on for support, with whom you would share your information.

I don't believe your response about "getting a check up" or a? "medical follow up" to be deceptive, but just revealing information on a need to know basis.

I would be interested in what others have to say as well.
 

sunset

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

I am afraid that a lot of people view therapy as something to be ashamed of. I certainly dont go around broadcasting it, just like I wouldnt for an OB/GYN, or family Dr. appt.

Roseanne Barr was on Larry King last night, and she has been in therapy for yrs and has been diagnosed with lots of mental problems, and is doing fine now. Maybe that is what triggered me to ask this question. She is on national TV saying all this and here I am worried about what my therapist thinks of me.

I am curious to what others have to say about this, including therapists as well as people who go to them.
 

sunset

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

Let me add one more thing... I have a lot of respect for this profession and the dedicated Dr's that are out there helping people. I am not ashamed of the profession, just in relation to how it is perceived if you go for help.
 

sunset

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

Let me add one more thing... I have a lot of respect for this profession and the dedicated Dr's that are out there helping people. I am not ashamed of the profession, just in relation to how it is perceived if you go for help.

sorry for the double post!! Not sure how that happened.
 

Halo

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

Sunset, I think that is a great question. ?I know for myself that most people do not know that I go to but I have told a select few. ?I have been told that they don't think that I am crazy but just that I am taking the necessary steps to take care of myself. ?I did have to tell my two immediate bosses because of time off of work during the day and such but they have been great and helpful when I need it. ?They also respect that this is a subject that I do not want the whole office to know and they have kept it to themselves. ?I really respect them for it. ?

Anyway, talk to you later.
N.
 

jwfoster32

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Re: Is any embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist?

Sunset...

I don't feel seeing a therapist as an embarassment at all!! In fact, I think it is a sign strength and introspective thought. By going to therapist, you are saying to yourself that there are problems outside your scope of being able to deal with. A secondary (unrelated) opinion is a great thing at times.

If those that you share the fact that you are seeing a therapist with choose to cast judgement, that is THEIR issue. You may also want to reevaluate your relationship with these people if that is in fact the case.

Jeff
 

Peanut

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Sunset, I can relate to how you feel, I used to feel that way when I was a bit younger. I don't feel that way anymore though. People generally become more understanding when they are older. But also, I find now, that I enjoy the people who are able to admit to having flaws and who are able to laugh at themselves and their flaws. The way I see it, everyone has lots of things go wrong, and nobody's perfect, so I admire when people are able to come to terms with the flaws and the problems that are inherently human, and I like it and are really drawn to people that are open about it. Also I find that secrets lose all the power they had over you when you let them out.

With that being said, I don't think that there is anything wrong with not telling people that you don't want to tell-if that's your preference. I think either way is perfectly acceptable.
 

tinkerbellnm

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No one should be embarrased to see a therapist of any kind. If anyone would have a problem with it, they obviously have a serious problema and need to see a therapist too. Seeing a therapist is a very good thing. One of my friend is an alcoholic and was embarrased to say that he was going to start going to AA meetings. I told him that at least you are sorting yourself out and not drinking. You need to stop being paranoid, you are not crazy for seeing someone just honest and very bright.Well done for you for sharing that with us. Means alot. :D
 

sunset

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Thank you all for your opinions on this topic. Very interesting....

It is nice to know that not everyone views this as "you are a mental case and ready for a straightjacket" kind of thing.? There was a time (2 yrs ago) when I hit rock bottom and ended up in the hospital psych ward. I was going through many traumas in the matter of a couple of months and I needed help. The big things being I just had a total hysterectomy ( I? have no kids, and it was rough for me to come to terms with). While I am home recuperating, I find out I am losing my job in 2 months after having? worked there for 18 yrs and the people were all like family to me. My favorite aunt died, my father, then another aunt, and an uncle.? I was dealing with many feelings of abandonment, and incredible loss. It got to the point that I was crying and crying and could not stop. They said I had a breakdown.
Well, I was only in the hospital for 1 day, and they realized I needed to talk to someone, but I certainly didnt need to be in a psych ward, so I was released, as I wanted to be right away.
I have heard whisperings to keep quiet about being in the hospital because people will label you as a mental case and are fragile and cant handle life, so tip toe around her. I guess this is where I felt I should be ashamed to need this kind of help.
Thank you for showing me another side to what others think. You have given me more to think about.
 

Peanut

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It is nice to know that not everyone views this as "you are a mental case and ready for a straightjacket" kind of thing

I think almost anyone could be ready for a straight jacket under the right circumstances :)
 

ThatLady

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I think this is something you can look at in more than one way. If you have an ugly wart high on your backside, and the doctor tells you the wart cannot be removed (an improbable situation, but humor me here ;) ), you're not likely to wear a bikini cut low enough to allow the wart to wave at all who come up behind you. You'll probably wear a one piece bathing suit and go on with your life. It's no big deal, really. It's just a wart, and you're just a human being.

Now, at one time in my life I spent a month in a psychiatric facility. Depression took me down far enough that I wasn't safe. It was shortly after my daughter attempted suicide and I found out she was bipolar. She was also in hospital at the time. I blamed myself. I should have seen it. I should have known. I should...I should...I should...the list was endless. I crashed and burned. Is this something I discuss with everyone I know? It isn't, and it wasn't at the time. It was part of my life, but it was a private part of my life. I'm not ashamed of it, but I do consider it private and not of concern to anyone other than those closest to me.

Today, I'm a productive, happy, functioning member of society. I have a good job and good friends. I have nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about, and that includes that hospitalization. That, and the therapy that followed (and some that preceded that incident) is what helped me to become who I am now. What's to be embarrassed about? I know a lot of people who could benefit from the good fortune I had by getting the help I needed, when I needed it, to get past that bump in the road. Some will be smart enough to get that help and some will not. Those who do will find the path through the darkness.

Try to think of yourself as someone who is utilizing all the available tools to do the best possible job of becoming the very best you you can be. That's a good thing, isn't it? :)
 

tinkerbellnm

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The only way a doc cannot remove a wart is if it is cancerous. Yours doesnt sound like it is. I would get a second opinion babes. As for mental cases, I think everyone has some sort of disability whether it is spelling, reading, cant throw. So no one can say anyone is more mental than anyone else. Just having a rough time is what it boils down to.
 

Heather

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Hi, I wanted to say that I used to be embarrassed as well, until I found out that my counsellor and a few of my lecturers at uni had also seen a counsellor, so now I don't mind telling people, although I have to admit that at work only one person knows!!!

So yeah it happens to a lot of us.

Heather...
 

foghlaim

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who exactly helps a counsellors and therapists when they need help?
hope i did that right
over here my understanding is that counsellors and therapists must attend a monthly supervision session. that is they must have their own therapist as a condition of practising.? making sure they do not get overwhelmed by topics their clients bring up.

as for embarrassed to admit to seeing a therapist.
i would have to say i am.? ?i have trouble myself with the fact that i am seeing one. and i also see it tho as my private life.

nsa
 

sunset

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My own Dr has told me he has been through therapy himself and wanted me to know that he understood and can relate to what I was saying to him, and feeling. I think he wanted me to know, so I wouldnt feel so alone and that many people do in fact, go to therapy!
 

David Baxter

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Many, perhaps most therapists have had the experience of "the other side of the couch". In certain types of therapy (especially psychoanalysis) it is a required part of training.
 

Lana

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I don't know if I'm embarassed to admit that I have had, and continue to, have therapy sessions. I think I'm more protective. It's my private little safe corner where I can completely open up (although at times, even in this safe corner, opening up is tricky) The self talk in my head is "If I tell someone they'll want to snoop around, ask questions, and *gasp!!* comment on validity or efficacy of it all" :eek:

I actually had an experience where I told someone I was seeing a psychiatrist and got the "You don't need that" back. My initial reaction was confusion/embarassment, then anger, and then realization that the fact that I even considered such comments valid were good reasons to seek therapy. I also learned that I don't have to broadcast my personal life to everyone. Incidentally, one of the things I learned through therapy is to be confident in my choices and decisions. I'm still work in progress. :D
 

Lost

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I've read all the posts, and find myself nodding my head in agreement with everyone...

it's those who have the strength to see therapists who are the ones who will find their way out of the darkness...
... nothing to be embarrassed about ...

Yet there are only 2 people in my life who know I go to a therapist (excluding the therapist! - basically my husband, the first therapist who couldn't see me who recommended this one.) and I will conjur up every excuse under the sun rather than just state the truth, "I've got to go to my therapist's appointment."
Just can't do it. Don't want people to know. People don't need to know.
 

just mary

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I feel the same way. I didn't tell anyone I was seeing a therapist, not even my husband. I would pay my therapist in cash so there would be no trace, I would ask for my receipt right away, so he wouldn't mail it to me. I felt stupid for going, like I was making a mountain out of a molehill. I think I just needed someone I could talk to, someone I could trust. I eventually told my husband and he was obviously upset, mainly hurt that I wouldn't talk to him. He thought I was foolish and that it was a waste of money, he told me that I should gvie my head a shake, he asked if my head was any smaller. :) I don't see a therapist anymore, I'm going to AA now which is most definitely NOT a substitute for therapy, it's a freakin religion but it's kind of nice to talk to people who have seriously screwed up but are willing to try and become better at living. It gives me hope, maybe I can change, maybe not.

But I really do wish we could be more open about seeing therapists and attending to our mental health.
 

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