• Quote of the Day
    "You are much deeper, much broader, much brighter than any idea you could have of yourself."
    Harry Palmer, posted by Daniel

lammers1980

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Hello all,

Just wanted to thank everyone for the help they've been these last few weeks. I'm feeling that I am on the road to wellsville so to speak, although the path is a little crooked.

I just wanted to share a new revelation I've had. I was reading the four step approach to treating OCD and there was a very interesting sentence in it. It said that the feedback loop that many OCDers get is related to the orbitofrontal cortex, located right above and behind the eyes. Strangely enough, when I get an obsession, I can actually feel a throbbing feeling right above my left eye. Could this be the work of said cortex? Not sure, but it sure is interesting. This may sound crazy, but depending on what I am thinking about and how I am feeling, I can actually sense within my own head what parts are working hardest. I believe this can actually be achieved through getting to know ones own mind.

What does this all mean? It means that I can now have a new tool in identifying obsessions, because the almost inevitably are accompanied with that tension above my left eye.

I am interested in finding out if anybody else is able to do this or am I delusional? :eek:
 

Daniel

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Strangely enough, when I get an obsession, I can actually feel a throbbing feeling right above my left eye. Could this be the work of said cortex?
No, not in the way you are talking about.
This may sound crazy, but depending on what I am thinking about and how I am feeling, I can actually sense within my own head what parts are working hardest. I believe this can actually be achieved through getting to know ones own mind.
You would need a PET scanner or some other brain imaging equipment.
It means that I can now have a new tool in identifying obsessions, because the almost inevitably are accompanied with that tension above my left eye.
Well, whatever works for you. This tension is due to cortical activity but in the sense that what one thinks may lead to physical (psychogenic) symptoms like tension.
 

lammers1980

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Well, here goes. Areas of the brain most active are using the most blood. Therefore it is not inconceivable to a highly focused person to physically sense those things. I am aware that they may be the result of muscle tension, yet different emotions quite clearly feel different inside one's head.

Regardless, I am not surprised that there are doubters. I would respectfully disagree.
 

Daniel

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Therefore it is not inconceivable to a highly focused person to physically sense those things.
Where are the nerves? The brain can't feel itself.

This may be helpful:
The patient is awake during the deep brain stimulation surgery to allow the surgical team to assess the patient’s brain functions. While the electrode is being advanced through the brain, the patient does not feel any pain because of the unique nature of the human brain and its inability to generate pain signals. When the surgeon makes the small opening in the skull a local anesthetic is administered. The anesthetic used is similar to those used during a dental procedure to numb an area of the mouth.

http://cms.clevelandclinic.org/neuroscience/body.cfm?id=141
 
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lammers1980

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Good point. However, it is not a feeling of pain, but more of a general sensation. For all I know it could be minor changes in volume resulting in subtle intracranial changes that are felt in ajacent areas of the skull as a result of changing blood flow. All I know is that there are consistent sensations in specific areas of my head associated with specific stimuli that are felt and are able to be recreated at different times.
 

Daniel

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I have found some numbers regarding the differential in blood volume in this article:
Elevated thalamic and prefrontal regional cerebral blood flow in obsessive–compulsive disorder: a SPECT study (abstract only)

The link below is to a table in the article that lists the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) numbers: . ROI/cerebellar rCBF ratios

From what I gather, rCBF is standardly measured in ml/min/100 g. So, based on my layman understanding of the table, the differences between normal and obsessive blood flow seem to be less than 0.1 ml / min / 100g for each area listed. I can't imagine how anyone could detect such a difference without a machine. However, I'm very glad you brought this subject up because the numbers are pretty interesting.
 
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lammers1980

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No problem. I know it sounds highly improbable, but I've read some really amazing stories of what people have been able to accomplish with the power of the mind and self-awareness. One of the best sources of such amazing stories seems to be Buddhist monks of various times. I've heard stories of monks elevating their body temperatures and surviving exposure to extremelycold temperatures in the Himalayas. There are other such stories of "mind over matter" that seem to defy all scientific knowledge. I've always been an extremely introspective person and have spent absurdly long periods of time figuring myself out. That is why I cannot discount the possibility of what I am experiencing, even if it defies all logic.
 

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