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Daniel

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Yunnan Bai Yao can be used safely in dogs to prevent and control bleeding cancers in dogs.

More recent evidence shows that Yunnan Bai Yao can kill dog haemangiosarcoma cell lines in-vitro. Therefore, it may provide clinical benefit in dogs with haemangiosarcoma. Yunnan Bai Yao by itself is not known to be superior to standard of care therapy (i.e. surgery followed by chemotherapy), but certainly can be used safely in combination with anti-cancer therapy.

Currently, veterinary studies are being performed in the USA by Veterinary Oncologists to define safety further and determine the clinical benefits of this herb for dogs with haemangiosarcoma (with and without chemotherapy). So far, the results show that it is safe, but we are yet to know whether it can improve survival times in dogs with haemangiosarcoma.

We need better therapy for dogs with haemangiosarcoma, so I hope that future studies will be able to show that dogs with haemangiosarcoma can clinically benefit from this herb...

Each packet is usually accompanied by a small red pill. It is a higher concentration of Yunnan Bai Yao and is intended for treating significant bleeding. I usually advise owners to save this pill and to administer one red pill when a massive bleed is suspected...

Unfortunately, there is a lot of testimonials and word of mouth recommendations regarding the use of TCM [Traditional Chinese medicine], that gives owners false hope. It is crucial to base the use of TCM on scientific evidence and research.
 
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In my practice, 100% of dogs with cancer have low vitamin D3, again showing how important testing is and how essential it is to normalize D3 levels. Animals and people with normal vitamin D3 levels are less likely to have cancer. Vitamin D supplementation is needed for those with low blood levels of vitamin D, and supplementation is used based on the animal’s weight and health condition as well as the vitamin’s blood level.
 

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Hemangiosarcoma is Blood or Skin Cancer in Dogs and Cats

[An internal] bleeding episode will manifest as weakness, chill and pale gums. A snug bandage wrap around the belly may stop the bleeding in the home setting. Obviously, this kind of first aid approach is not a replacement for emergency medical treatment but if you are doing home hospice care, it may be appropriate.
 

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...Integrative veterinary medicine operates in this interesting and challenging space between established proven knowledge and data that is incompletely evaluated. If a treatment makes sense, and has a low chance of harm, then it has value and may be used when present knowledge is inadequate. If there is scientific research supporting the theory or idea then that is even better. As experience builds some things are found to be unworkable while others are found to be useful and become part of "conventional" veterinary medicine...

As data works its way through that path we need people who care and who are brave enough to try something new (which is often something old), and we need people that are skeptics and refuse to accept anything without strong scientific facts. Through that interplay we see veterinary medicine grow and improve as we keep those things that work and abandon or replace things that fail to make the mark.

Science is a funny word. It literally means "knowing." Some feel that individuals are incapable of knowing and only through rigorous scientific investigation can anything be proven and accepted. Others have disdain for the subject entirely, feeling it takes too long for any real knowledge to be found and proven. Personally I like science. To me it is simply one more tool to seek truth and hopefully find healing. The larger field of science is incredibly useful in finding, cataloguing, and investigating facts and their interrelationships.

For years, holistic and now integrative veterinarians have used the herb Astragalus to help ill patients. If you search Pubmed for Astragalus you will find over 5,000 studies on this herb. It's known to be safe and studies have shown that it is capable of improving kidney function in rats and dogs. We also find it helps delay senility in rats and supports heart function while reducing blood pressure. Studies also show the herb to be antiviral and anti-inflammatory, while improving immunity in mice with tumors. As with many herbs, there may be reactions with certain drugs so its use should be shared with a veterinarian knowledgeable about herbs and drugs.

And while all these studies are done but lost in the eternal depths of scientific libraries that few clinical veterinarians frequented, finally two interested and dedicated integrative veterinarians named Susan Wynn and Barbara Fougere took a couple years of their lives to write an evidence based book on Veterinary Herbal Medicine. Because of their work, interested, ethical and competent veterinarians can find this data more simply. And as veterinarians begin to learn more about herbs they become much more interested in their use. Many will join professional groups so they can associate with other veterinarians who are experienced in the use of herbs.

Now anyone can learn this stuff. Well anyone who will take the time to study and read with the intention of helping their patients live better, longer lives.

Goldy is feeling better now. She has a fatal disease, but her energy and activity have returned to normal and if we stop the Astragalus she gets tired again. Since Astragalus has no known harmful effects, does not interfere with any of her other medications, and since we are confident in our herbal source for its purity and safety her mom is happy to keep her on the herb.

I'm just happy she feels better.
 
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Daniel

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Exercise, massage, or dog chews/toys may be more effective, but if you have money to burn:



The above supplement may be helpful as an "upper" though would not be as effective as a cheap prescription corticosteroid like prednisone.
 
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My favorite supplement for any pet for any reason is not a pill but mostly water: Purina Pro Hydra Care. It is a great way to prevent dehydration. It smells just like KFC gravy but is low calorie (mostly water with a little whey protein isolate and liver flavor and some thickener). It is intended for cats, but I give it to some of my senior dogs as well.

You can also make your own version by making broths/soups of liver/organ meat, chicken, turkey, fish, etc., buying no-salt-added broths at the grocery store, or using broth powder sold for pets.

With pet cancer, steroids like prednisone can also help promote hydration and also help prevent hypercalcemia. In humans, hypercalcemia is the most common potentially-deadly complication of cancer, affecting up to 30 percent of cancer patients.
 
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John Grote, DVM:

My concern is recommending tramadol for pain mitigation in the dog. Recent studies have indicated it has no effect on pain alleviation. I do in-home euthanasias as well as hospice and palliative care. I have had numerous cases that were put on tramadol and the owners called me for euthanasia due to the effects of this horrible drug. Once we get the dog off the tramadol, they get back to normal function and many of those dogs that would’ve been euthanized because of a drug live quite normal lives for a period of time. I’m happy to discuss this at any time as I feel strongly that this drug should not be used in the dog at all.
 

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The two primary-care vets I have talked to now about Palladia (an anti-cancer kinase inhibitor) do not think it is worth the side effects for palliative, metastatic cancer care (such as to prevent additional tumor growth). But there are clinical trials now for dogs combining Palladia with common drugs like antihypertensives to see if there is a synergistic anti-cancer effect. In human research at least, metformin is also being studied to add to cancer medication.


"The role and benefit of chemotherapy/antineoplastic agents versus conventional palliative drugs in this setting remains unclear."
 
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Common drugs used would be metacam, previcox or deramaxx. These are all anti-inflammatory drugs than control moderate pain and inflammation.

Usually these are combined with narcotic-type drugs like Tramadol, codeine or long-acting morphine.

Other choices used in combination with these drugs are gabapentin, amitriptyline, or amantadine. These drugs are newer neurotransmitter modifiers.

A patch containing the narcotic Fentanyl can be applied every couple of days to the skin. It is delivered to the blood through the skin (transdermally).

If your vet is not talking to you about options like these, please be bold and start asking about them. Be your dog’s primary health advocate!
 
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Over the past decade treating pain in pets has gained more recognition in veterinary practice, but far too often I see pets at the end of their lives in horrible pain – and they have been that way for months or years. Most of these pets have been seen by a veterinarian but the pain is simply not being treated or treated effectively.

Our animal patients deserve better – especially our seniors. I’ve written this article specifically because I think you should know how pain is treated by veterinarians who are taking the time and making the effort to learn this ever-changing part of medicine.
 
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Daniel

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Yunnan Bai Yao can be used safely in dogs to prevent and control bleeding cancers in dogs.

More recent evidence shows that Yunnan Bai Yao can kill dog haemangiosarcoma cell lines in-vitro. Therefore, it may provide clinical benefit in dogs with haemangiosarcoma. Yunnan Bai Yao by itself is not known to be superior to standard of care therapy (i.e. surgery followed by chemotherapy), but certainly can be used safely in combination with anti-cancer therapy.

Currently, veterinary studies are being performed in the USA by Veterinary Oncologists to define safety further and determine the clinical benefits of this herb for dogs with haemangiosarcoma (with and without chemotherapy). So far, the results show that it is safe, but we are yet to know whether it can improve survival times in dogs with haemangiosarcoma.

We need better therapy for dogs with haemangiosarcoma, so I hope that future studies will be able to show that dogs with haemangiosarcoma can clinically benefit from this herb...

Each packet is usually accompanied by a small red pill. It is a higher concentration of Yunnan Bai Yao and is intended for treating significant bleeding. I usually advise owners to save this pill and to administer one red pill when a massive bleed is suspected...

Unfortunately, there is a lot of testimonials and word of mouth recommendations regarding the use of TCM [Traditional Chinese medicine], that gives owners false hope. It is crucial to base the use of TCM on scientific evidence and research.

I bought five packs of Yunnan Bai Yao from the manufacturer, which shipped it quickly and had the lowest price. There is no solid proof that it works. But vet oncologists have anecdotical evidence it can stop/prevent cancer-related bleeding (and related anemia). It has a good/great safety profile in numerous studies. And it is used in other emergencies involving bleeding (both human and animal).

Cherry-picked case studies in dogs: Yunnan Baiyao - Miracle Herb for Your Clinic
 
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Daniel

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The package insert says Yunnan Baiyao can be used for bullet wounds "no matter how severe," which is shocking or funny to read but was one reason it was originally distributed.

A few small/recent studies:







And:

Recent researches showed that tumor metastasis is correlated with platelet aggregation and blood hyperviscosity manner. Therefore, the early application of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and biological therapies, in combination with Chinese medicine therapy for activating blood circulation and removing stasis (ABCRS) may be, after all, an effective approach.
 
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There seems to be two schools of thought in the vet oncology world when it comes to dog cancer. On the one hand, dogs tolerate chemo better than humans and the cost for some oral drugs like Palladia is relatively cheap except for frequent bloodwork. On the other hand, the treatments are not as effective/targeted/researched as in humans, and dogs can't communicate unseen side effects. There is also the fact that dogs are living in the moment.

So most older dogs with metastatic cancer will be "spared" from chemo and will be given corticosteroids or NSAIDs (never both, though they can be switched after a washout period), as these have some anti-tumor or at least anti-inflammatory effects in dogs and can help with quality of life. Corticosteroids can also help with preventing weight loss.

Similarly:


"The prognosis for animals suffering from malignant neoplasia (that may be amenable to chemotherapy) generally remains poor and the place of oncology in veterinary medicine can be questioned."
 
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The typical private-practice veterinarian is well qualified to monitor the medical treatment of a cat diagnosed with terminal cancer. “But if you would feel more comfortable with a second opinion,” she suggests, “you can always ask your local veterinarian to refer you to a veterinary oncologist who focuses on cancer and pain management.”

An owner should also be instructed on how to recognize breathing abnormalities and other signs that a cat may be in distress. Also, the owner should learn which pain medications—whether administered orally, by injection, or by means of a patch—can be administered at home and which must be administered only by a veterinarian.
 
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Whether online or in the local pet store, there are a bewildering variety of pet healthcare products and services to choose from. Diets and supplements, ancient herbs and folk remedies, and even high-tech treatments like hyperbaric oxygen tanks and laser therapy. Everything promises to give your pet better health and a longer life, and isn’t that what every pet owner wants?

But how do you know if all of these products do what they claim? Are they safe? If they really are miraculous cures, why are so many offered only on the Internet or by a few veterinarians specializing in “alternative medicine?”

Brennen McKenzie, a vet with twenty years of experience and the former president of the Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association, helps pet owners and veterinary professionals understand the claims and the evidence, allowing them to make better choices for their companions and patients.
 

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Similar book regarding human medicine:



Cancer victims are bombarded with misleading information about alternative medicine. Many such treatments try to sell false hope at inflated prices, and many promise a cure without side-effects. This book explains why alternative cancer cures are a fallacious concept. However, it also outlines the important role of alternative medicine in supporting cancer patients and improving their quality of life.
 

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What are the most common types of cancers in dogs? How many dogs typically get cancer?​

Answer: One in four dogs will be diagnosed with cancer, and its the leading cause of death in pets who are beyond middle age. The most common types of cancers that veterinarians see are lymphoma (up to 24% of all new canine cancers are lymphoma); osteosarcoma (most common primary bone tumor which accounts for 85% of all skeletal tumors and are quite aggressive); mast cell tumors (most common skin tumors in dogs); oral melanomas in dogs (most commonly occur on the skin, in the mouth and on the toenails); hemangiosarcoma (malignant tumors derived from the cells lining blood); and transitional cell carcinoma in dogs (most common tumor type of the urinary system in dogs).

 
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