More threads by no point

no point

Member
Is it panic attack if you know beforehand that you are going to have an attack? I have had these "attacks" since forever and most of the time, I can feel that I am going to have an attack. I fear the attacks so much. They start with hot flashes and blurry vision and then, I feel dizzy and become nauseated. They last for about 2 hrs. After the attacks, I'm fine except that I get really hungry and tired. I try avoiding the attacks by not getting out much and I don't go to places that might trigger an attack. This way I don't have panic attacks often but sometimes, I just can't avoid an attack. I went to a couple of doctors and they can't find anything physically wrong with me but I keep having them anyway. I just don't know what to do. I'd really appreciate your help. Thnx.
 
welcome to the forum, no point, i hope we can be of help to you here. i have the following thoughts on your question.

yes this sounds like panic attacks to me. the first time you have a panic attack you don't know what it is, so you don't necessarily need to know it's coming.

i'm wondering why they last 2 hours, that seems a bit long, i thought (but i could be wrong) that they typically last up to 10 minutes. although i must say i had one one time that seemed to last for a couple of hours, looking back i think it was because i kept getting triggered continually. it sounds like this may be what is happening to you.

back to knowing that it's coming, quite often the fear of going into a panic attack is what brings it on. the minute you notice the slightest thing that makes you think of panic attacks, it can start a negative cycle of thinking. the very fear that you may be having a panic attack makes you actually have it - if that makes sense.

i would recommend you consult a therapist as they can help you cope. there are techniques you can learn to get the attacks under control and eventually you won't have them at all anymore. you can get a referral from your doctor or you can ask around to see who is reliable.
 

ThatLady

Member
Hi, No Point. :)

These episodes sound pretty scary. I've got some questions, if you can answer:

You say the episodes are infrequent. How often would you say they happen?

Do the "attacks" always happen only when you're among other people, or have you had them come on while you were alone?

When you went to the doctors, can you tell me what specialty the doctors practiced and what tests they might have run?

Have you ever taken (or had someone take) your pulse during one of these episodes?

Have you ever actually lost consciousness when an "attack" occurred?

Heh. I said I had some questions, didn't I? :D
 

no point

Member
Thanks a lot for your replies.

Lady bug: I have a therapist already but I can't really talk to her about the attacks. She knows about the attacks but I don't really feel comfortable talking about them. Come to think of it, I don't really feel comfortable talking about most things with her.

Thatlady: Here are the answers to your questions.

Sometimes, I have attacks that are two weeks apart, sometimes a month apart. Like, I just had an attack today and the attack before that was a month ago. But the attack before that attack was two weeks before. They are infrequent probably because I also have depression and I don't like to get out much mostly because I don't want to be among other people and I don't want to have an attack.

Mostly the attacks happen when I am among others.

I had someone take my pulse during an episode and she said it was within a normal range.

I have never really lost consciousness although sometimes I thought I would because of the dizziness.

I don't really remember the specialty of the doctors I went to but I remember there were 5 or 6 docs. All they said was that it is "psychological".

Thanks again...
 

ThatLady

Member
Actually, no point, your "attacks" are more frequent than most people would want to have to deal with! I sure wouldn't want to feel like that as often as you do. :(

Have you ever had an electroencephalogram (EEG) that you remember? Also, how long has it been since you've seen a doctor concerning these symptoms?
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
Have you asked your doctors about migraine, facial migraine, or ocular migraine?
 

Retired

Member
No Point,

With Dr. Baxter's observation in mind, have a look at this Psychlinks posting which you might add to your information gathering to discuss with your doctor.

I don't really feel comfortable talking about most things with her

Your therapist should be your partner in therapy. What's causing the difficulty you have in communicating with her?
 

no point

Member
Thanks a lot for your answers. I never really have headaches but it could be a migrane without headaches. I thought they couldn't be panic attacks because they last too long (2 hours) and I never really have chest pains or trouble breathing during the attacks. I think I should go during an attack so they have a better sense of what's going on. I just hate that I don't know what it is and why it keeps happening.

Thatlady: I have never really had an EEG. The last time I went to the doctor was 10 years ago so I don't really remember what kinds of tests they did.

TSOW, I really like my therapist but I'm a very private person. That's why I'm having great difficulty opening up to her. In fact, it took a lot of courage for me to post on this forum.

You've all been really helpful. Thnx :)
 

ThatLady

Member
If it's been ten years since you've been evaluated by a doctor, it's high time you saw one again, no point. The symptoms you describe may well be psychological, but without an evaluation by a neurologist and an EEG, I really don't feel that all bases have been covered in your case.

Telling a therapist all about your most private thoughts and feelings is never easy, but we have to start somewhere. We have to let someone know the truth of what we're going through in order to get help. The therapist needs to be that someone. They need to be a partner in your journey to wellness. To do that well, the therapist must know what's going on in your life, in your mind, and with your feelings. It takes courage to talk about it, but it's a courage that's well worth finding.
 
Some of ther panic attacks ive had have made me dizzy but they were quite bad ones.

You know there can be lots of reasons for the symptoms u have including stuff like low blood sugar. I guess the same is true for panic attacks though, can be from alot of things either way see a doctor.
 

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