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    "You are much deeper, much broader, much brighter than any idea you could have of yourself."
    Harry Palmer, posted by Daniel

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There was a double bonus in Central Florida today with a spectacular rainbow appearing at dusk. The rainbow appeared in the East as the sun reflected on the rising moon!

After seeing the shuttle launch this morning, this was indeed a bonus!
 

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HA

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Wow, Steve! What a great photo. Must have been something to witness in real time.
 

Halo

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Those are awesome photos Steve, thanks for sharing them :)
 

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HeartArt,

It was truly breathtaking! I am glad I had the opportunity to see it.
 

ladylore

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Cool photos! Its pictures like these that remind me why I love nature so much.
 

emery2027

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Great pics. I have a nice camera but pictures of the sky don't turn out that well for me, so I admire your skill!
 

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I admire your skill!

Thank you Emery, but credit has to be given to the programmers at Casio for providing software that can interpret the scene and adjust the exposure.

I just happened to be at the right place at the right time ;)

What kind of camera do you have?
 

sunset

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Just beautiful!! I took one in my backyard but with a darker sky. I wish I knew how to post on here. Maybe when I get home, I can play around with it and see if I can show it to you..
 

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It would be great to see your rainbow photo. You need to resize your picture if it's a jpg to a maximum of 620 X 280 pixels and a maximum size of 97.7 kb.

The operation differs from one picture editor to another, so if you cannot figure it out, let us know which photo editor you are using, and we'll try to help.
 

emery2027

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My camera is a Kodak, with 7.1 megapixels. At least that's what it says on the side. I'm camera-illiterate, so when someone asks me what kind of camera I have, I don't have any idea if that's the info they're looking for! :rolleyes: I really need to learn more so I can get the most out of it. Sky pictures and close-ups of tiny things like insects are difficult, but regular pics turn out crystal clear.
 

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Emery,

I believe most digital cameras today incorporate programs that preselect exposure criteria based on your choice of scene. Typical choices might be landscapes, portraits, backlit portraits, night scenes, fireworks.

They way these automated programs work is the manufacturer enters data from typical scenes of that genre so your picture is analyzed and the exposure criteria (shutter speed and aperture opening) are set to make the best picture.

Does your model provide you with a choice of picture genre?

Steve
 

emery2027

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Yes it has choices for picture genre. My son is the best one in the family at using the camera, and he tried taking a rainbow picture once. Several shots and it never really did turn out right. It was brilliant IRL but on film it was barely visible. Lightning turns out well if we're really careful (that's tricky anyway and requires lots of luck, too), but taking a picture of the moon is out of the question. All we get is a dark picture with a tiny yellow dot in the center. I know that photography of celestial bodies takes special equipment, but the moon was very large in the sky one night and we still couldn't get a good shot. Then a few nights ago the sky at sunset was the most brilliant I've ever seen it--it looked like it was on fire. We took about 8 shots of it and only 2 were any good, but even those weren't of the highest quality.

99% of the pictures we take with that camera turn out very well, but those speciality shots are tricky. I suspect that maybe it's because of a combination of factors--limits to our skill, limits to our camera, and lack of a tripod, which I'm told will clear up some of the issues.

My biggest beef is that I can't take pictures of insects. I would just love to do that!
 

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