• Quote of the Day
    "Hope is the thing with feathers, That perches in the soul,
    And sings the tune without the words, And never stops at all."
    Emily Dickinson, posted by Daniel

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,137
Points
113

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride.

Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring:
  1. Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels.

  2. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar.

  3. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine.

  4. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently.

  5. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner.

  6. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets.

  7. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike.

  8. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration.

  9. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar.

  10. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker.
Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respond.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,951
Points
113
Important information to know. I don't have diabetes but I do sometimes have issues with low blood sugar and some of those on the list I didn't know.

Thanks, Daniel.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,137
Points
113
I've just started testing my blood sugar at home since I have a touch of prediabetes (after gaining weight during the pandemic). So far, it was highest after eating take-out Chinese food. So I will be saving money by going back to my old Subway routine.

The home testing is very helpful because I no longer have to deal with competing theories. Like this morning, my blood sugar was even a little better/lower after eating eggs than it was fasting.
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
19,137
Points
113

Common in diabetes are such responses as denying the presence of the disease, self-soothing by eating when experiencing distress, and eating unhealthful foods in order to make urges to do so go away. Given the often asymptomatic nature of the disease and the fact that people often don’t feel different than before they were diagnosed, denial and attempts to eliminate diabetes-related thoughts and feelings are common.

The next level of analysis is also behavioral. When individuals with diabetes deny the presence of the disease or engage in unhealthy behaviors to regulate emotion or eliminate urges, successful management of blood sugar becomes very difficult. When avoidance occurs in response to private events, this may interfere with necessary self-management behaviors, such as adhering to a proper diet and exercise regimen, performing blood sugar tests, adhering to medication regimens, and doing self-checks for foot problems or signs of infection...

Diabetes is a difficult disease to manage well, so a consistent focus on values and related goals gives those with the disease a meaningful structure in which to experience the difficult private events associated with the disease.
 

Top Bottom