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Napalm

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I have a few questions about the nature of practicing psychiatry, and also the training required to become one:

1. In actual practice, how much psychotherapy is involved in being a psychiatrist, compared to prescribing medications? Or do the two methods often go hand-in-hand?

2. Do you get paid during your period of residency as a psychiatrist?

3. Before applying to med school, is it preferable to major in psychology or biology? Or perhaps neuroscience, if the option is available? In other words, which major will better prepare me for studying psychiatry in med school? And I do know that medical schools often have specific course requirements for their programs before you qualify to be admitted to them, but I can use my electives for those, so I'm not too worried. (Note: I would prefer to not study that much biology, if possible, although I'm not opposed to it if I have to study it).

4. I'm pretty sure I already know the answer to this, but what relative percentage of the knowledge required to be a psychiatrist is memorization-oriented, as opposed to concept-oriented?

5. Any tips for getting an edge over my future competitors in applying to med school (other than a high GPA, of course :D) would be greatly appreciated, as well.
 

David Baxter

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I can't answer all of your questions, but I will address this one:

1. In actual practice, how much psychotherapy is involved in being a psychiatrist, compared to prescribing medications? Or do the two methods often go hand-in-hand?

That depends entirely on the psychiatrist. For some, psychotherapy is the primary focus and medication is secondary. For others, the practice is solely focused on medication issues.
 

Napalm

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That depends entirely on the psychiatrist. For some, psychotherapy is the primary focus and medication is secondary. For others, the practice is solely focused on medication issues.
Does this mean that, upon becoming a psychiatrist, one can simply choose which kind of treatment he/she wants to focus on? Or do you have to do specific training to become a psychotherapy-oriented psychiatrist, as opposed to a medication-oriented one?
 

Retired

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I dealt with psychiatrists during my working career in a service oriented capacity.

I noticed that psychiatrists with a particular treatment orientation tended to work together, so specific hospitals were known for style of treatment being offered by most of the staff.

This collegial association would then serve as a source of continuing medical education in that particular style of therapy.

Do you get paid during your period of residency as a psychiatrist

I would expect this varies depending on where one does their Residency.

In Canada, there are Provincial Associations that determine the remuneration received by Residents.

Where are you located, Napalm?
 

Daniel

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5. Any tips for getting an edge over my future competitors in applying to med school (other than a high GPA, of course ) would be greatly appreciated, as well.

At least for US medical schools, advance preparation for the MCAT would be helpful. For other factors that are important:

AAMC: Applying to Medical School

Amazon.com: Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR) 2008-2009: The Most Authoritative Guide to U.S. and Canadian Medical Schools (Medical School Admission Requirements, ... Requirements, United States and Canada): Books: Julie A., Ph.D. Chanatry

medical school - Google Book Search
 
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Napalm

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I'm in Ontario. The city I'm in is Ottawa, at the moment, although that might change soon... but I'll still be in Ontario, either way.
 

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If I were you, Napalm, I ride over to the Royal Ottawa Hospital and ask to speak to the Chief Resident. You may have to make an appointment, but if you explain that you are a prospective med student, you may have a good chance to see her/him.

You could also find out when Grand Rounds take place there, and sit in on them. Afterwards you could introduce yourself, explain your interests and ask your questions.

Do you know anyone in Psychiatry in Ottawa that you can talk to about your plans? If you do, that person would be a good contact to put you in touch with one of the current Psych Residents.

Keep us posted on how this research goes. There may be some other helpful suggestions from others on the Forum.
 

Napalm

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That's a good idea, TSOW. I'm going home for Thanksgiving this weekend, but once I get back I'll definitely try to do that. I could probably try to contact some officials from medical schools in Ontario and ask them some questions, too. I'll definitely keep you guys posted on my progress.
 

Napalm

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In the meantime, though, feel free to continue to offer your own answers and advice, eh? :)
 
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:lol: i would, but i have no knowledge on the subject. i look forward to what you find out though, let us know and it will keep the discussion going :)
 

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