More threads by Murphy

Murphy

Member
When I was prescribed Dexedrine for adult ADD, I was told that it would not be addictive. It worked for a while until I became tolerant, but continued to take it. I wanted to try Concerta, doctor said no. When my life finally got so out of control, I demanded some kind of help. She talked with a resource, took me off Dexedrine cold turkey for 4 days (of misery) and put me on Concerta. That was over a month ago. I was on 20mg of Dexedrine spansules for 4 years.

Several days ago, I visited her again with a list of new symptoms. I felt like I was dying. She now says that I'm in withdrawal from Dexedrine. As I gaped in relief, no questions came to mind, but I don't think she could give me any clear answers anyway. The symptoms continue.

I want to know: how long is this going to last? Is there any detoxification process that I can do? Is my brain permanently on zombie mode? Help.

I thank God that my family is understanding.
 

Murphy

Member
When I was prescribed Dexedrine for adult ADD, I was told that it would not be addictive. It worked for a while until I became tolerant, but continued to take it. I wanted to try Concerta, doctor said no. When my life finally got so out of control, I demanded some kind of help. She talked with a resource, took me off Dexedrine cold turkey for 4 days (of misery) and put me on Concerta. That was over a month ago. I was on 20mg of Dexedrine spansules for 4 years.

Several days ago, I visited her again with a list of new symptoms. I felt like I was dying. She now says that I'm in withdrawal from Dexedrine. As I gaped in relief, no questions came to mind, but I don't think she could give me any clear answers anyway. The symptoms continue.

I want to know: how long is this going to last? Is there any detoxification process that I can do? Is my brain permanently on zombie mode? Help.

I thank God that my family is understanding.
 
Hi Murphy,

I am sorry you are experiences these symptoms. The answer to your question is vague as this is what I was able to find..."The length of time this takes depends on the amount of medicine you were using and how long you used it. During this period of time check with your doctor if you notice any of the following side effects:

Mental depression; nausea or vomiting; stomach cramps or pain; trembling; unusual tiredness or weakness."

http://www.healthtouch.com/bin/Econ...itle=Dexedrine+,+Dextroamphetamine&cid=HTDRUG

Please know I am not a medical doctor but this information can be found at the above link. Hope your symptoms subside.
 
Hi Murphy,

I am sorry you are experiences these symptoms. The answer to your question is vague as this is what I was able to find..."The length of time this takes depends on the amount of medicine you were using and how long you used it. During this period of time check with your doctor if you notice any of the following side effects:

Mental depression; nausea or vomiting; stomach cramps or pain; trembling; unusual tiredness or weakness."

http://www.healthtouch.com/bin/Econ...itle=Dexedrine+,+Dextroamphetamine&cid=HTDRUG

Please know I am not a medical doctor but this information can be found at the above link. Hope your symptoms subside.
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

As Dr. Dobson alluded to, information about the duration of withdrawl from Dexedrine (Dextroamphetamine) is unclear.

Dextroamphetamine is habit forming. You can become physically and psychologically dependent on this medication, and withdrawal effects may occur if you stop taking it suddenly after several weeks of continuous use.

The manufacturer Glaxo Smith Kline in the U.S. provides this information:

Abrupt cessation following prolonged high dosage results in extreme fatigue and mental depression; changes have also been noted on the sleep EEG. Manifestations of chronic intoxication with amphetamines include severe dermatoses, marked insomnia, irritability, hyperactivity, and personality changes. The most severe manifestation of chronic intoxication is psychosis, often clinically indistinguishable from schizophrenia

This would suggest the medication requires tapering, that is the dosage is gradually reduced over a period of time depending on the particular drug characteristics. (pharmacology)

The website of Glaxo Smith Kline Canada does not contain the product monograph and prescribing information for Brand name: Dexedrine.

Consider calling your pharmacist and explain you are experiencing withdrawl symptoms and would like more information about what to expect.

I notice you are located in Ottawa, so your other option is to go to Emergency at the Royal Ottawa Hospital where the specialists there would have experience in dealing with amphetamine withdrawl.

Keep us posted on your progress.
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

As Dr. Dobson alluded to, information about the duration of withdrawl from Dexedrine (Dextroamphetamine) is unclear.

Dextroamphetamine is habit forming. You can become physically and psychologically dependent on this medication, and withdrawal effects may occur if you stop taking it suddenly after several weeks of continuous use.

The manufacturer Glaxo Smith Kline in the U.S. provides this information:

Abrupt cessation following prolonged high dosage results in extreme fatigue and mental depression; changes have also been noted on the sleep EEG. Manifestations of chronic intoxication with amphetamines include severe dermatoses, marked insomnia, irritability, hyperactivity, and personality changes. The most severe manifestation of chronic intoxication is psychosis, often clinically indistinguishable from schizophrenia

This would suggest the medication requires tapering, that is the dosage is gradually reduced over a period of time depending on the particular drug characteristics. (pharmacology)

The website of Glaxo Smith Kline Canada does not contain the product monograph and prescribing information for Brand name: Dexedrine.

Consider calling your pharmacist and explain you are experiencing withdrawl symptoms and would like more information about what to expect.

I notice you are located in Ottawa, so your other option is to go to Emergency at the Royal Ottawa Hospital where the specialists there would have experience in dealing with amphetamine withdrawl.

Keep us posted on your progress.
 

Murphy

Member
Thanks so much, Dr. Dobson and Steve for the information. I hadn't thought of asking the pharmacist, but I'm sure that will help. Knowing that I can go to the RO gives me some of peace of mind just in case. I do experience all the symptoms mentioned in Dr. Dobson's reply, except vomiting--I don't eat much!

I welcome any more replies, personal or posted, as to advice, experience, or warnings.

Thanks.
 

Murphy

Member
Thanks so much, Dr. Dobson and Steve for the information. I hadn't thought of asking the pharmacist, but I'm sure that will help. Knowing that I can go to the RO gives me some of peace of mind just in case. I do experience all the symptoms mentioned in Dr. Dobson's reply, except vomiting--I don't eat much!

I welcome any more replies, personal or posted, as to advice, experience, or warnings.

Thanks.
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

I need to revise some info I previously posted about emergency services at Royal Ottawa Hospital.

It was brought to my attention emergency services are no longer available there, but Psych Emerg is now at the Civic Hospital down the street.

Rgards,
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

I need to revise some info I previously posted about emergency services at Royal Ottawa Hospital.

It was brought to my attention emergency services are no longer available there, but Psych Emerg is now at the Civic Hospital down the street.

Rgards,
 

Murphy

Member
UPDATE: since info on withdrawal is hard to find.

It's been 8 weeks now since I went off dexedrine without tapering. (bad idea) This week I am beginning to see the light of day. I washed dishes yesterday--woohoo! And did some laundry! I do not trust myself to drive yet. I may have overdone it, and today I feel extra exhausted and shaky. I will lie down when I finish this.

Keep in mind, I am 52 and have CFS/FMS. The withdrawal symptoms were double or triple all that plus a few more thrown in for good measure.

Yes, my house is a mess.

My pharmacist searched her manuals and was surprised to find nothing that would help me.

Murphy
 

Murphy

Member
UPDATE: since info on withdrawal is hard to find.

It's been 8 weeks now since I went off dexedrine without tapering. (bad idea) This week I am beginning to see the light of day. I washed dishes yesterday--woohoo! And did some laundry! I do not trust myself to drive yet. I may have overdone it, and today I feel extra exhausted and shaky. I will lie down when I finish this.

Keep in mind, I am 52 and have CFS/FMS. The withdrawal symptoms were double or triple all that plus a few more thrown in for good measure.

Yes, my house is a mess.

My pharmacist searched her manuals and was surprised to find nothing that would help me.

Murphy
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

It's not surprising your pharmacist would not have easy access to information on withdrawl. You really need to consult a psychiatrist or psychopharmacologist who have expertise on the subject.

Calling the Ottawa Hospital or better still visiting the emergency department might get you the info you need, if you feel your body has not cleared yet.
 

Retired

Member
Murphy,

It's not surprising your pharmacist would not have easy access to information on withdrawl. You really need to consult a psychiatrist or psychopharmacologist who have expertise on the subject.

Calling the Ottawa Hospital or better still visiting the emergency department might get you the info you need, if you feel your body has not cleared yet.
 

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