• Quote of the Day
    "The hardest battle you're ever going to fight is the battle to be just you."
    Leo F. Buscaglia, posted by Daniel

Daniel

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Pain is one of the most common symptoms that people with dementia experience. However, often it is poorly recognised and undertreated in dementia. The main reason for this is that, as dementia progresses, the person’s ability to communicate their needs becomes more difficult.
 

Daniel

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"At 93, so deep in dementia that she didn't remember any details of her life, my mother somehow still knew songs."

~ Floyd Skloot
 

Daniel

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"My husband is stricken with dementia, and it's a trick of his condition that events and people from his past are more real to him than what happened five minutes ago."

~ Laurie Graham
 

Daniel

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Speak slowly and in short sentences with only one idea per sentence. For example: “Hi Mary. I’m Jane, your friend.” or “What a beautiful day. The sunshine is nice, isn’t it?” or “Tell me about your daughter.”
 

Daniel

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It’s estimated that an early diagnosis of dementia could save $7.9 trillion in medical costs over multiple years and provide care tailored to the needs of the patient. This would include access to medical trials, medications to slow the disease progression, active management of comorbid conditions and the opportunity to engage in goal planning for the future. Why, then, do we not diagnose people early? We know that it is best to diagnose any disease at the beginning of symptoms, but for some reason, dementia carries a stigma that prevents most of us from asking and confirming the diagnosis.
 

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Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke — obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes — negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.
 

Daniel

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Alzheimer’s disease is not an inevitable result of aging. Those genetically predisposed can markedly delay it or show no evidence of it before they die by doing the things we know are healthful: exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, minimizing red meat in the diet, and doing things that are cognitively new and challenging to the brain, like learning a new language or a musical instrument.”`

~ Dr. Thomas T. Perls, a geriatrician at Boston University
 

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