• Quote of the Day
    "There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered."
    Nelson Mandela, posted by Daniel

David Baxter

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Sorry. That was the latest major Google update that seems to have royally messed up their search results.

As an example, try typing "site:forum.psychlinks.ca" (without the quote marks) into a Google search. There should be thousands of pages listed. Instead, there are two. Webmasters all over the world are currently tearing out their hair :hair: and leaping tall buildings in a single bound :panic: about this sort of thing at the moment, while Google tries to reassure us that it's all been fixed. :rant:

And now i really should go and ban myself for taking this thread :eek:fftopic:
 

stargazer

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I believe it was I who originally took the thread off-topic, but in my humble opinion, tangents are what life's all about. Tangents are invariably more interesting than former subjects from which they spring. And, on that same note, great men and women throughout history have accomplished their finest work during bouts of procrastination. And if one doesn't grasp the logical connection between tangenting and procrastination, one simply doesn't qualify to participate in discussions such like these. :blank:
 

ThatLady

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Having perfected both the art of procrastination and the art of tangenting, I feel really qualified! I'm so pleased with myself! :D
 

stargazer

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Kudos. There ought to be support groups where all that happens is that everyone sits around and procrastinates together for an hour, with no requirement for membership other than the willingness to go off on tangents.
 

ThatLady

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stargazer said:
Kudos. There ought to be support groups where all that happens is that everyone sits around and procrastinates together for an hour, with no requirement for membership other than the willingness to go off on tangents.

I thought that's what this forum was! Sheesh! Have I missed something? :D
 

stargazer

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I apologize. It was only my delusion of grandeur that credited myself with being the one who initiated the departure from the topic.
 

David Baxter

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There ought to be support groups where all that happens is that everyone sits around and procrastinates together for an hour, with no requirement for membership other than the willingness to go off on tangents.

Of course, the first order of business would be who gets to procrastinate first. Given the nature of the participants, that one could go on for weeks. :eek:
 

stargazer

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Understood. It takes me quite a while sometimes (however paradoxically) to make the decision to procrastinate.
 

ThatLady

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Having, as I said, perfected the art of procrastination, I will naturally beat you all to the punch and be the first to procrastinate. In fact, I'm procrastinating as we speak! :eek:
 

stargazer

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Well, the only reason I'm replying at all is because I'm procrastinating acting on my recent decision to stop procrastinating.
 

stargazer

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On a new and serious note, I did *not* get the six-week summer job for which I applied, but I *did* get a 2-week job with the same company, an actuallly better job, though only for 2 weeks. They also asked me to apply for a year-round position working with the same people as the 2-week job. It's really really good pay, even for only 2 weeks, so of course I accepted it.

Interestingly, all my upcoming appointments (MediCal on 6/15, PsychEval on 6/16) take place right before the job starts on 6/19. So it turns out I *can* easily both follow through with the disability/SSI stuff, and also go off and work. What I'm wondering is if working for 2 weeks (in which I'll make something like $1500) is going to be a blot on the SSI process, showing them that I actually *can* work. I'm just in the dark.

A friend of mine had her teaching credential and had taught for a number of years before something happened and now she has been on SSI for several years. She doesn't strike me as being unable to work, but what she said is that they don't go by inability to work, they go by how long has it been since you worked. So, if for whatever reasons someone is out of work, or has worked only minimally recently, is that what qualifies them for disability?

Maybe Toeless's Mom knows these answers. It's the weekend right now, and I don't feel like I can call anyone. And on that note, I've called Mental Health three times in the past week to see if they're ever going to get me a therapist, and they have not returned my calls. Ironically, this only increases my anger issues and frustration with the system, giving me all the more reason to need therapy.

Three years ago I'd have just made a phone call, and two or three days later been sitting in a cushy therapist's office. I did that a few times, even when I had Kaiser. I just went outside of Kaiser because I thought I needed more help. I even went to a psychiatrist outside of Kaiser to get a 2nd opinion. So I guess part of my frustration is that I was used to that convenience, and now I'm totally poor just like most of the rest of us, and I can't quite accept it.

But looking back, I was pretty spoiled back then. In some greater picture, poverty is probably teaching me a lesson...but ah, I digress.
 

David Baxter

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First, congratulations on the job offers and possibilities, stargazer.

Second, I totally sympathize with your confusion and frustration with the mental health system, insurance carriers, and disability offices. It is a nightmare.

What I would suggest, though, is that if you have an opportunity to work and are able to work, go for it. You'll gain much more in self-esteem and satisfaction and it pays a whole lot better than disability.
 

stargazer

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What you just said rings true for me. A lot of this is that I'm a person who is used to working, and to the feeling of gaining self-esteem through work. And I'm not a person who's used to the system--if anyone is. It really does seem, though, that my three friends on SSI are reasonably content with life. But I'm not sure if I would be.
 

David Baxter

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There may well be times in your life when you need it and there is nothing at all wrong with being on disability when you do need it. But I think most of those who need to be on disability will tell you they'd rather not need to be on it.

From what I know about you, I think you need to feel that you are able to be both creative and contributing - when you are able to feel that, you are at your most content and your most fulfilled.
 

stargazer

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David Baxter said:
From what I know about you, I think you need to feel that you are able to be both creative and contributing - when you are able to feel that, you are at your most content and your most fulfilled.

What you know about me is accurate. And I guess I would have to say that none of the people I know who are on SSI are really as fulfilled as they could conceivably be. I've been impressed, however, with their stability. But I do agree with your assessment of me and my situation.
 

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