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Arnie

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
Messages
12
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1
What kind of care is given to a person prescribed an anti-depressant such as Zoloft? What does it take to get a prescription, "I'm sad, may I have a pill please?"

What about the "talking cure"? The pill doesn't listen or offer advise.

So to summarize my question-

Should Zoloft (as an example) be prescribed as the result of a person's complaint or under the guidance and care of a clinical psycologist type

Just wondering-

Arnie
 

Arnie

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
Messages
12
Points
1
What kind of care is given to a person prescribed an anti-depressant such as Zoloft? What does it take to get a prescription, "I'm sad, may I have a pill please?"

What about the "talking cure"? The pill doesn't listen or offer advise.

So to summarize my question-

Should Zoloft (as an example) be prescribed as the result of a person's complaint or under the guidance and care of a clinical psycologist type

Just wondering-

Arnie
 

Retired

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
8,966
Points
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Arnie,

Not sure what you mean by your question about what kind of care is given to a person prescribed an anti depressant. Would you elaborate what you mean?

In the meantime, I'd like to offer the following for your consideration.

Being depressed is more than just occasionally feeling blue. Depression is an illness which can be diagnosed by a qualified mental health professional using very specific criteria.

If you feel your mood is affecting your life, your relationships and your quality of life, then speak to your family doctor.

Your conversation could go something like: " Doc, I've been feeling very bad lately..or the last six months (whichever applies). My mood just isn't the way it was and I feel I need help."

Your doctor will probably ask you some specific questions and or will refer you to a specialist.

Depression is a treatable illness. You have the courage to come here to find out more, and your nest step should be to consult a qualified mental health specialist.

Don't be swayed by thinking "what others may think" because nearly one out of three people are afflicted by this illness. Those who do not seek help live painful lives..those who seek help usually improve.

The goal of therapy is to have more good days than bad days, and the course of improvement will follow that path.

Your doctor has a wide variety of effective medications in his/her armamentarium to help you, if it is decided to use meds.

Your doctor will advise you on your best courses of therapy.

You've made the important first step by asking for information, now your next step should be to call your doctor for an appointment.

Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.
 

Retired

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
8,966
Points
36
Arnie,

Not sure what you mean by your question about what kind of care is given to a person prescribed an anti depressant. Would you elaborate what you mean?

In the meantime, I'd like to offer the following for your consideration.

Being depressed is more than just occasionally feeling blue. Depression is an illness which can be diagnosed by a qualified mental health professional using very specific criteria.

If you feel your mood is affecting your life, your relationships and your quality of life, then speak to your family doctor.

Your conversation could go something like: " Doc, I've been feeling very bad lately..or the last six months (whichever applies). My mood just isn't the way it was and I feel I need help."

Your doctor will probably ask you some specific questions and or will refer you to a specialist.

Depression is a treatable illness. You have the courage to come here to find out more, and your nest step should be to consult a qualified mental health specialist.

Don't be swayed by thinking "what others may think" because nearly one out of three people are afflicted by this illness. Those who do not seek help live painful lives..those who seek help usually improve.

The goal of therapy is to have more good days than bad days, and the course of improvement will follow that path.

Your doctor has a wide variety of effective medications in his/her armamentarium to help you, if it is decided to use meds.

Your doctor will advise you on your best courses of therapy.

You've made the important first step by asking for information, now your next step should be to call your doctor for an appointment.

Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,370
Points
63
If you are essentially asking, "Which is better? Psychotherapy or medication?", I think the research on that issue is very clear: The combination of psychotherapy and medication is better than either alone... better in the sense of faster relief from the immediate symptoms, fuller recovery, and greater resistance to later relapse or recurrence of depression.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,370
Points
63
If you are essentially asking, "Which is better? Psychotherapy or medication?", I think the research on that issue is very clear: The combination of psychotherapy and medication is better than either alone... better in the sense of faster relief from the immediate symptoms, fuller recovery, and greater resistance to later relapse or recurrence of depression.
 

Arnie

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
Messages
12
Points
1
David/TSOW-
What I'm asking is once depression is suspected/diagnosed, and an RX written, is there normally follow on care to see if the meds are working, and to help the person deal with and possibly overcome the depression.

Thanks all-

Arnie
 

Arnie

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
Messages
12
Points
1
David/TSOW-
What I'm asking is once depression is suspected/diagnosed, and an RX written, is there normally follow on care to see if the meds are working, and to help the person deal with and possibly overcome the depression.

Thanks all-

Arnie
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,370
Points
63
What I'm asking is once depression is suspected/diagnosed, and an RX written, is there normally follow on care to see if the meds are working, and to help the person deal with and possibly overcome the depression.
There definitely SHOULD be a followup within two weeks for an initial prescription and thereafter regularly at least until the dose is titrated to an effective one. I believe that most physicians will do this as a matter of common practice but I have seen a case or two where this didn't happen.

As for help beyond medication, again that depends on the physician. Some will recommend a psychologist or other psychotherapost. Some will do brief counseling themselves (here in Canada, many family physicians these days receive training in brief crisis counseling or psychotherapy). Of course, there are some patients who will consent to taking medication and for various reasons aren't comfortable with the idea of "talk therapy" -- that is the choice of the patient ultimately, just as it is when the patient is seeng a therapist and doesn't wish to consider taking medication.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,370
Points
63
What I'm asking is once depression is suspected/diagnosed, and an RX written, is there normally follow on care to see if the meds are working, and to help the person deal with and possibly overcome the depression.
There definitely SHOULD be a followup within two weeks for an initial prescription and thereafter regularly at least until the dose is titrated to an effective one. I believe that most physicians will do this as a matter of common practice but I have seen a case or two where this didn't happen.

As for help beyond medication, again that depends on the physician. Some will recommend a psychologist or other psychotherapost. Some will do brief counseling themselves (here in Canada, many family physicians these days receive training in brief crisis counseling or psychotherapy). Of course, there are some patients who will consent to taking medication and for various reasons aren't comfortable with the idea of "talk therapy" -- that is the choice of the patient ultimately, just as it is when the patient is seeng a therapist and doesn't wish to consider taking medication.
 

Retired

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Messages
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Arnie,

If depression is diagnosed and if the choice is to treat with medication, there should be constant and frequent follow up with the treating physician.

Not all anti depressants are effective for everyone and some people tolerate some meds better than others.

There should be a communication with your physician to monitor the effectiveness and your ability to tolerate the meds prescribed.

It's not unusual to have to alter dosages or change prescriptions several times before the optimal dose is found that works for you.

You need to be a partner in your health care with your physician, so it would be worthwhile having a conversation with your doctor on the issue of communication and follow up and what you can expect in the the ability to reach the doctor when necessary.
 

Retired

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
8,966
Points
36
Arnie,

If depression is diagnosed and if the choice is to treat with medication, there should be constant and frequent follow up with the treating physician.

Not all anti depressants are effective for everyone and some people tolerate some meds better than others.

There should be a communication with your physician to monitor the effectiveness and your ability to tolerate the meds prescribed.

It's not unusual to have to alter dosages or change prescriptions several times before the optimal dose is found that works for you.

You need to be a partner in your health care with your physician, so it would be worthwhile having a conversation with your doctor on the issue of communication and follow up and what you can expect in the the ability to reach the doctor when necessary.
 
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