• Quote of the Day
    "Hope is the thing with feathers, That perches in the soul,
    And sings the tune without the words, And never stops at all."
    Emily Dickinson, posted by Daniel

Daniel

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"What is important is how you treat your mind. If you take everything it says seriously, give it too much respect, and put too much trust in your mind, that is a recipe for an anxiety disorder."

~ Michael Stein, PsyD
 

Daniel

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"Several studies show that increasing perceived control, even if imaginary, reduces activation of brain regions that respond to threat and decreases anxiety."

"Horror films essentially offer a socially-sanctioned outlet for you to express your anxiety."
 
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Daniel

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Trick your mind with your body. Your mind often gets cues from your body, and you can sometimes use this to your advantage if you're feeling overstimulated. See, if you're super overwhelmed, your body is in that fight-or-flight mode, ready to take on a challenge or get the hell out of there. Your muscles are tense; your vision is focused; your blood is pumping to the places that need it most. But if you actively make an effort to breathe calmly, to unclench your fists, to relax your shoulders, your mind might get a message that there's nothing to be afraid of. This doesn't always work, of course, but it's worth trying! You can also trick your mind into believing you're more relaxed and less alert simply by shifting your body in subtle ways. Stand with confidence, even if you don't feel it. Uncross your arms and leave them loose at your sides. If you're frequently jittery, try to stand still. If there are too many lights, close your eyes for a minute. Too many sounds? Step outside or cover your ears. These small physical things can actually help you feel a bit less overwhelmed.
 

Daniel

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While scientific research has yet to explore the Sunday scaries, an informal 2018 survey conducted by LinkedIn suggests this feeling is very common. Among the 1,017 adults surveyed, 80 percent said they experienced Sunday night anxiety.

Sure, this knowledge won’t fix the problem, but it might help to know that plenty of other people are feeling the same way you are as the weekend winds down...

Make Mondays a special occasion. Schedule things you look forward to, like a video call with distant friends, for Monday to take the edge off some of the dread.
 

Daniel

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Accept your anxiety.​


Maybe you have to work harder than other people to find a place of calm, but that’s okay. Sometimes letting go of the need to control outcomes leads to greater acceptance of your circumstances. Reflecting on what you’ve accomplished should bring on the realization that as uncomfortable as worries make you, your track record for eventually overcoming anxiety is probably close to 100 percent.
 

Daniel

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Psychotherapists using an existentialist approach believe that a patient can harness his anxiety and use it constructively. Instead of suppressing anxiety, patients are advised to use it as grounds for change. By embracing anxiety as inevitable, a person can use it to achieve his full potential in life.



Instead of regarding human experiences such as anxiety, alienation and depression as implying the presence of mental illness, existential psychotherapy sees these experiences as natural stages in a normal process of human development and maturation. In facilitating this process of development and maturation, existential psychotherapy involves a philosophical exploration of an individual's experiences stressing the individual's freedom and responsibility to facilitate a higher degree of meaning and well-being in their life.
 

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