More threads by kelsischanging

Hi...for the past four years I have been getting my medications through my family doc...but recently I have not been responding well to my meds and my doctor and therapist wanted me to see a psychiatrist...I am going to one that my therapist highly recommened....here's the thing...I don't know what to expect...and to be honest...I'm kinda scared to go...that sounds dumb since I've been seeing a therapist for a while now....but I'm just scared....what kind of questions is he going to ask...what is it going to be like...ok....I'm just scared and I know that sounds dumb but thanks for you advice/suggestions....
Kelsey
 

ThatLady

Member
A psychiatrist is just another human being...a human being just like you, hon. He/she has attained expertise in a given field, but is still only human and not a "scary monster". Chances are pretty good, if he has some experience under his belt, that he has heard stories similar to yours plenty of times. He will not judge you, but is there to help you learn coping skills, and gain insight into the things that are bothering you. In other words, he works for you.

I think we all have a fear of the unknown, which includes starting something new. Yet, this particular endeavor could make all the difference for you. If you look at it that way, perhaps it will be a bit less intimidating. :)
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
If I have a client who is not responding to medication or psychotherapy as expected, I often refer to one of the psychiatrists in town for another opinion and most importantly for his expertise in medications and sleep issues. There are psychiatrists I would never refer to, of course. And if occasionally I hear negative reports from my clients about a psychiatrist in the area, I add him or her to my list of "do not call" practitioners.

If you trust your therapist and your therapist has faith in the psychiatrist s/he recommended, i think you can be assured you will be in good hands. I'd never knowingly send a client to someone who I thought would do any harm.
 

Eunoia

Member
Think of it this way, you wouldn't want your doctor or current therapist to handle your meds if they don't know what they're doing 100%, so if they're at a loss as to which meds and what dosages etc. to prescribe you, not only should they refer you to a psychiatrist but they're probably doing themselves and you a big favour by not "messing around" w/ your meds just b/c they can. What I'm trying to say is, that so many people just randomly get meds prescribed by their doctor and never end up in therapy in the 1st place, but doctors have a very limited amount of training about the mental health field in comparison to a psychologist or psychiatrist. The benefit of a psychiatrist is that s/he can offer you psychological & medical advice in terms of medication. Again, just as you had to find the right therapist, maybe finding the right psychiatrist will take some time, but if both your doctor and therapist recommend this person, I'd agree that it sounds like you're in good hands. It's always nerve-wrecking meeting a new person who will "examine" you in some way or another or have a "talk" w/ you but they're there to help... nothing else. If you give it your all they can do the same in return.
 
I do trust my therapist so I guess I should trust his suggestion for a psychiatrist...I'm just wondering is he basically just going to ask me a lot of questions....also, my therapist told me to be as honest as I can (which makes sense to me cause how can he give me the right meds)...unfortunately being honest is not one of my strong qualities and also I tend to shut down when people ask me questions about emotions and stuff like that... so i guess that's what i'm scared of that I won't be able to A)tell the truth and B)that I will shut down...if either or both of those things happen the whole session will be a total waste...also how long is this going to take like 20 minutes or something....thanks for your replies
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
If it's a copnsult only (one-time evaluation), anywhere from 15 minutes to 45-50 minutes is typical, depending on the nature of the problem presented to the psychiatrist.
 

Eunoia

Member
well for him to be able to make a proper assessment, I'd assume he's going to ask as many questions as will make it possible for him to do so. Keeping in mind the time limit David suggested, there's only so much someone can ask, especially if the agenda is to find out why the meds aren't working, which ones could etc. I'm assuming he will have some kind of "heads up" or background info from your psychologist and doctor in relation to this.... it makes sense to worry about this but try just to be as open and honest as you can, you can even go there and say that you're worried about this and then just see how things go... he has training in this so he should be able to get at what he wants to know or needs to know. It's one thing to have difficulties expressing your emotions, but if he were to ask how you're feeling and you'd say "happy" instead of "sad" then yes, there would be a problem (but he'd know this isn't true anyways), so as long as you can give the basics it sounds like it'll be fine... remember he can only work w/ the info he's been given so it does come down to how open, honest you choose to be.
 

Meg

Dr. Meg, Global Moderator, Practitioner
MVP
Hi Kelsey,

I was just wondering whether you could explain to the psychiatrist right at the start that you're worried about one or both of those things happening. If he's aware that those things could happen it might help, perhaps? Just a thought.

Good luck with it, I hope that he will be able to help you sort out your medication.

Meg
 
Today, I saw my psychiatrist for the first time and I was honest like everyone kept telling me to be..I was more honest than I think I have ever been w/ anyone and it back fired majorly...the psychiatrist said that he would not be my doctor unless I went to an inpatient drug/alcohol rehab clinic...I was like no way, but eventually I realized that I needed to get my life back on track and that I needed him to be my doctor so I was like what ever...anyway I left his office and he said that he would be in contact w/ me so I was like ok...I went to school b/c I didn't know what else to do...I knew I shouldn't go home and be alone and I am really close to the school nurse and my guidance couselor and they both know what is going on...I basically went straight to the nurse's office and cried for like an hour and a half...I was/am so upset b/c I know I don't belong inpatient...anyway...I went home then and a lady called from the program that I was referred to and we had a phone interview b/c the treatment center is pretty far away from my house...after that my psychiatrist called and said that I didn't meet the criteria for inpatient in that program b/c I am a cutter (thank God!!)...so now I have another appt w/ him and my mom on thursday to pick a day program for me which still messes everything up w/ high school and all...anyway...I learned a valuable lesson today...being honest sucks and leads to bad things
 

David Baxter PhD

Late Founder
I'm really sorry to hear that, kels. It makes me angry when I hear about that sort of insensitivity in therapists who should know better.

Try to keep an open mind, however. Maybe this psychiatrist isn't the person to help you, or maybe you've just gotten off on the wrong foot.
 

Eunoia

Member
honestly, I think some of these people don't know how to deal w/ these situations and so they try to go "by the book" to cover their bases or their backs so to say. even though it seems like it 'backfired' to be honest, in the end if you're not then how is anyone ever really going to be of any help, right? being honest is difficult b/c you're opening up about a part of yourself, putting your trust in someone who you don't know (so why would you even trust them, right?). but trust me, if you go to therapy or talk to even a friend or someone else and you're never honest or try to make things appear a lot better than they actually are, you're getting nowhere. even if you have a legitimate reason to have this fear (and I think most people do) it's exactly this that will prevent you from getting the support and help you actually want/need. I'm just trying to say, don't give up on 'being honest'. do think about who to be honest w/ but in this case it was expected that honesty wouldn't be betrayed or used against you.

ok, so I just read your other post about how the appt. went... I know that the fact that the treatment will put you back a bit in terms of school is worrysome to you but, hun, you're talking about a few weeks but those are nothing compared to your life. and being able to live your life being happy. it's not such a big price to pay for that after all then, 5, 10 years down the road. just try to keep things in perspective. at least there's choices, right?
 

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