• Quote of the Day
    "It is only too easy to compel a sensitive human being to feel guilty about anything."
    Morton Irving Seiden, posted by Daniel

MHealthJo

MVP, Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
2,525
Points
36
It occurs to me too:

Say you WERE looking for 'THE' book, with THE magic answer, right? Let's say one or two major magic answers or big 'secrets' do exist, for a challenge you live with.

But let's assume THE magic answer is a thing that you need to DO. No results happen in life unless you DO something different, right?

So it follows that if you didn't DO and practise things you've come across, as you read them.....

You may have actually already found 'THE' magic answer, but you wouldn't know! Because it only starts to PERFORM its magic, with some committed doing! So a person could keep looking and looking, but it's already sitting on their bookshelf. :)

Haha, not to say I believe in 'magic answers' necessarily (although man, I do feel I've come across some things that have really been that way, for me and others I know). But its just a funny idea to think of. If magic DID exist.... and you found a book of spells...

But you just read it.... You didn't follow the magic formula, mix up the alchemy, and chant the magic words...

...then how would you realise that you've discovered true magic! And it works! And it's real!?? :)

We could use similar analogies like searching for the best recipe for a dish, but not knowing we've found it until we actually do the cooking. etc etc.... :)
 

GDPR

GDPR
Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
3,415
Points
0
I was not not suggested you are doing that, but I know that I was to a certain extent.

I know you weren't. I realized it on my own after alot of deep thinking. I kept asking myself why I keep repeating the same things over and over and never really get anywhere,especially when i have tried so hard to help myself(and have a zillion self-help books to prove it).

We could use similar analogies

....Like getting birth control pills,reading the pamphlet included with them but not taking the pills and wondering why you ended up pregnant...again?HaHa.
 

David Baxter

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
37,691
Points
113
Then there's the opposite: Men (*cough*), including me :redface:. buying anything, not reading the manual, and getting frustrated because it's "not working"...

I just bought a new plasma TV and spent a good few hours plugging in different connectors to different inputs and outputs and still failing to get it connected to my home theater system... I finally read the manual and learned I needed optical audio cables, which I didn't have. This evening, I purchased those and voila... worked first time. :panic:
 

MHealthJo

MVP, Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
2,525
Points
36
....Like getting birth control pills,reading the pamphlet included with them but not taking the pills and wondering why you ended up pregnant...again?HaHa.

Baha :D That reminds me of an old Yorkshire lady I saw on a comedy-documentary, talking about her experience as a young bride, extremely fuzzy on the 'details' of sex, conception, birth control. Wasnt explained well growing up, in her era and family!

She went to the doctor about being sick in the mornings, and after urine testing was informed she was 3 months pregnant.
'NOOH!' she exclaimed incredulously. 'I 'aven't been tryin'!' :D

--

In fairness to you LIT, you have mentioned yourself doing exercises and workbooks, writing, making different decisions etc - that's all DOING! - and plus if you hadn't 'DONE' things you'd be exactly where you were when you first opened your first book. You're not. :) It's of course harder to 'DO' certain things we read or get told, than other things; and that is normal. :)
 
Last edited:

making_art

Member
Joined
May 13, 2011
Messages
1,589
Points
36
Just finished The Sound of A Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey. A wonderful little book and true story about a women who becomes bed ridden after contracting a virus and inadvertently becomes attached to a wild snail. From my local library.
 

GDPR

GDPR
Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
3,415
Points
0
I have started reading Eckhart Tolle "The power of Now:A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment".

I don't remember when I bought it,it was sometime within the past few years,it was recommended by my therapist. I don't think I read it before though.If I did,I didn't absorb it at all.

I am ready to read it now though,over and over if I need to,so that I can truly absorb it. I also have "Practicing the Power of Now", which I plan on reading after I am finished with this one.

I know I really need to start focusing on the here and now,and I need help with it,so hopefully these 2 books will help.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

GDPR

GDPR
Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
3,415
Points
0
Last edited by a moderator:

GDPR

GDPR
Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
3,415
Points
0
I am learning SO much from this book.I highly recommend it for anyone that has experienced childhood trauma.
 

PrincessX

Account Closed
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
498
Points
0
Psychoneuroimmunology - reading it just out of interest. It is not an easy read, but very informative.

Psychoneuroimmunology: Methods and Protocols (Methods in Molecular Biology): 9781627030700: Medicine & Health Science Books @ Amazon.com

---------- Post Merged at 01:05 AM ---------- Previous Post was at 12:44 AM ----------

The Role of Psychoneuroimmunology in Personalized and Systems Medicine
By: Qing Yan
Abstract :
"Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) may provide the scientific basis for personalized and systems medicine. The exploration of the extensive interactions among psychological and behavioral factors, the nervous system, the immune system, and the endocrine system may help understand the mechanisms underlying health, wellness, and diseases. PNI theories based on systems biology methodologies may contribute to the identification of patient patterns for establishing psychological and physiological profiles for personalized medicine. A biopsychosocial model will help elucidate the systemic interrelationships between psychosocial and bio-physiological factors for the development of systems medicine. Many evidences have supported the close relationships between stress, depression, inflammation, and disorders including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, skin diseases, infectious diseases, and sleep disorders. As inflammation is a critical connection among different diseases, the elucidation of the associations may contribute to the findings of systemic therapeutic targets. With the understanding of the translational implications of PNI, integrative interventions in multiple dimensions can be applied to modulate stress responses and promote healthier behaviors. These interventions include combination drug therapies, diets, nutritional supplements, meditation, and other behavioral and mind-body strategies."
 

GDPR

GDPR
Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
3,415
Points
0
FYI...

There are many free kindle books every day on Amazon.I like to go to the site and search 'free kindle books self help' and I am always happy with what I find.

I narrow it down to exactly what I am looking for because there's way too many free ones to sort through.

I wasn't sure if people realize there's free books available...so now you know.
 

making_art

Member
Joined
May 13, 2011
Messages
1,589
Points
36
Thanks so much! I did not realize there were free books and was given a kindle as a gift....
 

heatherly

Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
243
Points
16
I am reading too many books, and that probably because none of them are so good that I can't put them down. 1. "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance:.: Sometimes his philosophy is great; sometimes I don't know what he is talking about. Other times I don't want to hear about motorcycle repair; 2. "Chicken Every Sunday" a book written about a family that runs a bread and breakfast, written in the 1940s; 3. "The Company of Wolves." This is a hard read because while I wanted to learn about wolves I didn't want to learn of mankind's cruelty/killing of them and how they do it. So when it bums me out I put it down again; 4. "Tao Te Ching: Annotated and Explained" I have tried other books on Taoism, even "The Tao of Pooh," but they all went over my head. This book by Derek Lin is easier and written beautifully; and 5. I am supposed to be reading "Roughing it" by Mark Twain, but I find it so boring. People don't understand this. I didn't even like Tom Sawyer, etc. but loved the movie. This is for our book group. I have two weeks to either finish it or give up. He is not funny. He is verbose in the worse way.

I swore in my old age that I would only read books that I loved because I am slowly losing vision, but here I am trudging through a few. I love true adventure and if anyone wants a list of good books I can go on and on, but of course we all don't like the same type of books.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom