• Quote of the Day
    "Too bad the only people who know how to run the country are busy driving cabs and cutting hair."
    George Burns, posted by David Baxter

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113

It can help to be mindful of whether you’re attending or overattending to the present moment; if you’re over attending, to “acknowledge that your mind has taken the act of meditation and shifted it to a performance review.”
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
"It would be frightening to think that in all the Cosmos, which is so harmonious, so complete and equal to itself, that only human life is happening randomly, that only one's destiny lacks meaning."

~ Mircea Eliade


"If you think it's you against the Universe, who do you think is going to win?"

~ Robert Thurman
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
“We all have two lives. The second one begins when we realize we only have one.”

– Rabbi Shlomo Seidenfeld
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
7477389bdeab41d25e814b0961d38629-1-jpg.11297
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
The writers who have most to give us often do most violence to our prejudices, particularly if they are our own contemporaries."

- Virginia Woolf
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
Almost all non-literate mythology has a trickster-hero of some kind. … And there’s a very special property in the trickster: he always breaks in, just as the unconscious does, to trip up the rational situation. He’s both a fool and someone who’s beyond the system. And the trickster represents all those possibilities of life that your mind hasn’t decided it wants to deal with. The mind structures a lifestyle, and the fool or trickster represents another whole range of possibilities. He doesn’t respect the values that you’ve set up for yourself, and smashes them.

-- Joseph Campbell
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
"What does matter is that we're a part. Like a thread in a cloth or a grass-blade in a field. It is and we are. What we do is like wind blowing on the grass.”

“Great self-destruction follows upon unfounded fear.”

“Your problem at present is this: you’re afraid to dream, and yet you need to dream.”

― Ursula K. Le Guin, The Lathe of Heaven
 
Last edited:

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
"No single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born."

~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery

 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113

Our thoughts are our best friend and our worst enemy. They come and go from our mind and even though they are impermanent, it often feels like they have taken up residency in our mind like squatters refusing to leave. No matter how hard you try to remove negative thoughts, they keep showing up. What if it isn’t necessary to drive them away, but see them as the sum of the thinking process?

What I mean is, negative thoughts is a label we assign to disempowering thoughts we don’t like. I would argue that they can be useful and our task is to integrate them into the wholeness of our being instead of trying to banish them. Thoughts are addictive when we cannot be alone in silence for more than five minutes. This is the feedback I’ve receive over many years from clients who are stressed. When I invite them to find five minutes a day to meditate, they’d rather have a surgical procedure performed than be alone with their thoughts.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113
“Tragedy occurs whenever awareness exceeds power; and particularly where awareness of a major need exceeds the power to satisfy it.”

“Even truth can be deceptive, whatever its appearance.”

― Karl Jaspers, Tragedy Is Not Enough
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113

Our modern conception of resiliency as “fighting” or being “tougher” is misguided. Learning happens when we are able to trust and feel safe; fear and shame are barriers, not facilitators, for authentic growth, acceptance, and change.
 

Daniel

Forum Supporter
MVP
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
18,679
Points
113

Some researchers argue that error-related negativity or error-related positivity is in fact, reward-related positivity...How we conceptualize neural responses to gains/losses allows us to further understand the underlying neural processes.
 

Top Bottom